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Farm Security Administration photographs, 1939-1942, 1939-1942 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 11 photographic prints

Collection of eleven color photographs taken from 1939 to 1942 by Farm Security Administration photographers Jack Delano (7 prints), Russell Lee (3 prints) and Marion Post Wolcott (1 print). The prints are sized 11 x 14 inches, and were created in the 1980s by photograph collector and gallery owner Tennyson Schad, using the dye transfer process. Subjects are diverse and include industrial settings such as a Pennsylvania steel mill and a sawmill in Maine; rural settings such as a wheat field in Washington State and tobacco cultivation in Puerto Rico; and scenes with people, including a group of African Americans fishing near a cotton plantation in Mississippi. Together, the images reveal the subject and stylistic choices made by these notable photographers commissioned for the FSA project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of eleven color photographs taken from 1939 to 1942 by Farm Security Administration photographers Jack Delano (7 prints), Russell Lee (3 prints) and Marion Post Wolcott (1 print). The color prints are sized 11 x 14 inches, with image sizes ranging from 6 1/2 x 9 3/4 to 10 x 13 inches. They were created by photograph collector and gallery owner Tennyson Schad in the 1980s, using the dye transfer process.

Subjects include industrial settings such as a Pennsylvania steel mill and a sawmill in Maine; rural settings such as a wheat field in Washington State; and photographs of people, including a group of African Americans fishing near a cotton plantation in Mississippi. There are several photographs of tobacco cultivation and communities in Puerto Rico, where photographer Jack Delano settled short after this project. Together, the images reveal the diverse subject and stylistic choices made by these notable photographers commissioned for the FSA project.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

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Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives as well as supporting papers and recordings, chiefly dating from the mid-1960s through 2000. The materials relate to Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora series includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration drives and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as discriminatory housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. The professional papers provide supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher, and include files related to research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document Espada's Puerto Rican diaspora around the world; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Espada was not only an observant photographer, but was also deeply involved in all of his projects as an activist, social worker, and humanitarian.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which also contains research files on documentary and research topics; preparation for his many photography projects and related exhibits; a few videocassettes; teaching syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews, derives from Espada's work with Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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International collection of picture postcards (6500 items, ca. 1900-1982), almost all of which date from 1920 or earlier. Arranged by country and filed in 28 albums. Almost all European countries are represented, and there are many rare postcards from Russia. (96-0135) (7 lf)

The addition to this collection (18000 items, from ca. 1900-1950) also is international in scope, but focuses on the United States. The collection comprises fifty, three-ring binders that hold picture postcards in pocketed mylar sleeves. About two-thirds of the cards show scenes in the United States, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; state capitols; worlds fairs; and other tourist destinations. Thirteen of the fifty binders document Atlantic City, N.J., and are subdivided by the images shown, including boardwalks, beaches, and hotels. The rest of the collection comprises postcards from other countries, including Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America are also represented. A small group of postcards depicts costumes from around the world. (00-422) (12 lf)

Formerly cataloged as the International Postcard Collection.