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John Jackson McSwain papers, 1910-1941 and undated 8.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 6600 Items

Lawyer, Army officer, and U.S. Representative from Greenville, South Carolina. Collection largely consists of letters from McSwain's constituents (1921-1936). Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); Prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain. Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes many speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring.

Collection largely consists of letters from John Jackson McSwain's constituents, dating from 1921 to 1936. Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain.

The correspondence starts with a few letters from 1910, when McSwain began to take tentative steps towards politics. There are letters relating to Dr. James Woodrow, Sept.2, 1910; and to Woodrow Wilson's campaigns for Governor of New Jersey in 1910 and for the presidency in 1912. There are patronage letters in 1912 and 1913, and a cloth portrait of Woodrow Wilson woven at Clemson College, South Carolina, in 1915.

Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring. The latest dates refer to condolences sent following McSwain's death of a heart attack in 1936, and his secretary Dixon Davis's political maneuverings with Joseph Raleigh Bryson following this event.

The digitized cardfiles provide a very detailed discussion of the collection's contents and topics. For access, please consult with a reference archivist.

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Robert H. Woody papers, 1927-1985. 6 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a professor of history at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscripts, short writings, vitae, certificates, diplomas, committee reports, printed material, photographs, 8 mm films, and VHS tapes. Major subjects include Robert H. Woody, the Civil War, the South, South Carolina, North Carolina, reconstruction, republicans, southern newspapers, biographies, mountain culture, folklore, history instruction, Duke University, the Duke University history department, and the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana. Major correspondents appearing in the collection include: William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, William T. Laprade, Francis Warrenton Dawson, Stanly Godbold, Jr., Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, Stanley Godbold, the Southern Historical Association, and the Historical Society of North Carolina. Some materials are restricted. Materials range in date from 1927 to 1985. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a teacher and historian at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Materials include correspondence with individuals and professional organizations, films, clippings, and writings (including original Civil War correspondence) pertaining to Woody's research, and manuscript materials for biographies of Civil War statesmen and Duke University President William Preston Few. Major correspondents include colleagues at Duke University: Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, and William T. Laprade. Correspondence is ordered alphabetically. Films are 8mm format. Some materials are restricted

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William Sims papers, 1770-1860 3.6 Linear Feet — 385 Items

Correspondence, financial papers, and legal documents, concerning William Sims' extensive plantation holdings in South Carolina. Includes two account books. Correspondence is primarily related to business matters, including cotton trade and prices; the price and availability of slaves; and the beginnings of a textile industry on the plantation. Local and state politicians in South Carolina are often mentioned, as is the general economic plight of the Southern planter in the period (ca. 1819-1830), and currency problems in the state (ca. 1826-1830). One personal letter effusively describes newly settled land in Mississippi and the quality of the cotton grown there.

Detailed financial papers form the bulk of the collection, and concern the cotton trade (including weights, bale numbers, shipping, prices, and sales), and household and plantation expenses. Legal papers are confined to deeds, documents of land litigation, military commissions, and documents relating to slaves, such as indentures and lists of slaves on the plantation. Also includes genealogical information on the Sims family.