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Adeline Burr Davis Green papers, 1796-1956 5 Linear Feet — 1551 Items

Married first to David Davis, lawyer, Supreme Court Justice, and U.S. Senator from Illinois, and then to Wharton Jackson Green, agriculturist and U.S. Representative from North Carolina; resident of Fayetteville, N.C. Personal and family correspondence. Includes journal of and letters, 1851-1853, from brother James M. Burr to his wife describing his life in California during the Gold Rush; Civil War letters to Adeline from her cousin (and later second husband), Wharton Jackson Green, while a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters, 1882-1885, from first husband David Davis describing daily proceedings in the Senate, social functions in Washington, D.C., and notable persons; letters from friends of Davis concerning personal and political matters; letters, 1906-1928, from Jessica Randolph Smith and others pertaining to the United Daughters of the Confederacy; and letters, 1911-1931, from cousin James Henry Rice, Jr., ornithologist, naturalist, editor, and literary figure, discussing politics, conservation, South Carolina culture, world affairs, especially relative to Germany and Russia, his rice plantations, and the League of Nations.

Papers of Adeline E. (Burr) Davis Green (1843-1931) include letters, 1851-1853, from James M. Burr, brother of Adeline (Burr) Davis Green, to his wife describing his life in California searching for gold; James Burr's journal entitled "Journal of a Cruise to California and the Diggins" ; Civil War letters from her second husband and cousin, Wharton Jackson Green (1831-1910), later agriculturist and U.S. congressman, while a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters, 1882-1885, from her first husband, David Davis (1815-1886), jurist and U. S. senator, describing daily proceedings in the senate, social functions in Washington, D.C., and notable persons; letters from friends of Davis concerning personal and political matters; letters, 1906-1928, from Jessica Randolph Smith and others pertaining to the Daughters of the Confederacy; and letters, 1911-1931, from James Henry Rice, Jr. (1868-1935), ornithologist, naturalist, editor, and literary figure, discussing politics, conservation, South Carolina culture, world affairs, especially relative to Germany and Russia, his rice plantations, and the League of Nations.

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Armistead Burt papers, 1759-1933 3.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 5,675 items

Armistead Burt (1802-1883) was a planter, lawyer, and U.S. Representative from Abbeville, S.C. Collection contains political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress. The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Collection includes the political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress.

The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

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Lawyer and U.S. District Judge, of Spartanburg, S.C. Personal, political, and professional letters and papers relating to Wyche's personal life, his early legal practice, social life and customs in South Carolina, local politics in South Carolina, his term in Congress (1913-1914), his service in World War I, the political career of Cole L. Blease, Wyche's interest in reform, and the 1924 senatorial election in South Carolina.

Papers of Charles Cecil Wyche, lawyer and United States district judge for the western district of South Carolina, contain correspondence and papers concerning business and legal affairs, politics, and family matters. Specific topics include Wyche's support of John Gary Evans in his campaign to be United States senator from South Carolina, 1908; descriptions of Paris, Brussels, and Berlin in letters of Isoline Wyche, 1909-1910; an attempt to prevent the granting of a pardon by Governor Cole L. Blease of South Carolina, 1911; Wyche's term in the state legislature, 1913; Wyche's legal business, particularly relating to the collection of debts and suits for damages in cases of industrial and automobile accidents; the campaign of Cole L. Blease for the governorship of South Carolina, 1916; attempts by Wyche to form a regiment of volunteers for service in Mexico or Europe; the influenza epidemic of 1920; and the national and state election of 1924, especially Wyche's support for James F. Byrnes in his race for the United States Senate against Nathaniel Barksdale Dial.

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Iveson L. Brookes papers, 1817-1888 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 720 items (inc. 11 volumes)

Collection includes correspondence of a Baptist preacher and landholder in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the management of cotton plantations, tariff and the nullification controversy, missionary work among slaves, student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of antebellum politics. Also discussed are diseases, health, and remedies, Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems along with Brookes' family genealogy and his sermon notes.

Collection contains correspondence of Iveson L. Brookes, a Baptist preacher and landholder in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the management of cotton plantations; tariff and the nullification controversy; transportation conditions; banking; missionary work among slaves; student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of ante-bellum politics; diseases, health, and remedies.

His later correspondence also discusses Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, religious revivals, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, the destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems. Correspondence by descendants includes mining near Potosi, Missouri, race relations in marriage and religion, politics in South Carolina in 1877, Columban College in Washington, D.C.; Brookes' family genealogy, and his sermon notes.

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Naturalist, conservationist, and local historian, of Wiggins (Colleton County), S.C. Chiefly personal correspondence (1910-1935) relating to the preservation of fauna in South Carolina and the Southeast, and to U.S. and South Carolina politics and history, family and business affairs, literature, and journalists. Includes a few clippings, photographs, and documents concerning Rice's life. Correspondents include William Watts Ball, Bernard Baruch, Coleman L. Blease, James F. Byrnes, Basil L. Gildersleeve, Ambrose E. Gonzales, William E. Gonzales, Dubose Heyward, Duncan C. Heyward, Thomas G. McLeod, Hugh McRae, Marie Conway Oemler, Gifford Pinchot, F. W. Ruckstull, Harry A. Slattery, and Benjamin R. Tillman.

The papers of James Henry Rice, Jr., naturalist, conservationist, and local historian, contain mainly correspondence reflecting his interest in natural history and the protection of wildlife; the history and contemporary politics of South Carolina; and family, business, artistic, and journalistic matters.

Material pertaining to Rice's activities as a naturalist and conservationist include letters, 1910-1913, to Rice from the Carolina Audubon Society and the National Association of Audubon Societies; correspondence, 1913-1917, with Robert Ridgway, E. H. Forbush, William Brewster, and officials of the National Museum in Washington, D.C., relating to Rice's work as inspector for the United States Biological Survey, concerning ornithology, particularly the breeding grounds, habitats, and migratory patterns of various Southeastern birds; long-term correspondence with Arthur Trezevant Wayne, author of Birds of South Carolina (Charleston: 1910); correspondence, 1927-1935, with William Chambers Coker, primarily concerning the identification of certain botanical specimens; correspondence concerning the Conservation Society of South Carolina; letters of naturalist Frank M. Chapman and explorer Carl E. Akely; correspondence with R. W. Shufeldt on natural history; letters concerning Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall and the Teapot Dome Scandal, 1921-1922; correspondence concerning forest lands in South Carolina with Courtlandt Braun, W. R. Mattoon of the United States Forest Service, and South Carolina state foresters, Lewis E. Staley, 1928-1931, and W. A. Smith, 1932; correspondence with W. T. Hornaday on conservation measures in the United States Congress, especially the Norbeck bill, 1929, which sought to impose hunting limits on ducks; correspondence, 1930, concerning the relationship of the National Association of Audubon Societies to the manufacturers of guns and ammunition; and letters relating to the meeting of the American Ornithologists Union in Charleston, South Carolina, 1928.

Correspondence on South Carolina politics and the state's history includes letters giving the views of various candidates for state and national office and commenting on elections and other political events; letters, 1905-1918, from United States Senator Benjamin R. Tillman; correspondence with Coleman L. Blease, governor of South Carolina, on the appointment of state game wardens, 1911-1913; correspondence relating to several articles written by Rice on local history and notable South Carolinians, especially "The Paladins of South Carolina," a series appearing in the State (Columbia, South Carolina) in 1922-1923, containing material on Martin W. Gary and Reconstruction in South Carolina, and Francis Wilkinson Pickens Butler's letters about Matthew Calbraith Butler; correspondence concerning the histories of the Rice, Elliott, Stuart, Clarkson, and Smith families, letters, 1929, discussing the life and career of J. Marion Sims; and correspondence, ca. 1926, with Dudley Jones on the history of the Presbyterian Church in South Carolina.

Items pertaining to business, literature, journalism and Rice's family include letters from George F. Mitchell on the development of coastal South Carolina; correspondence regarding a stock law for South Carolina, 1920-1921; correspondence with writers and academics including Marie Conway Oemler, Archibald Rutledge, Harriette Kershaw Leiding, William Peterfield Trent, Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, and Ambrose E. Gonzales; correspondence with Dubose Heyward and John Bennett concerning the Poetry Society of South Carolina; letters from Francis Butler Simkins, Jr., 1922-1923, responding to Rice's criticism of his work; correspondence relating to Rice's work as agent for the Chee-Ha Combahee Company promoting the development of coastal lands, 1921-1922; letters concerning the development of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina,1925; a long personal correspondence with the sculptor Frederick Wellington Ruckstull containing news of Rice's family and exchanges of opinion on politics, art, and history; letters from many of Rice's friends in the 1930s showing the effects of the Depression; and letters discussing Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal.

Printed matter and miscellaneous items in the collection include eulogies of Rice, several articles reflecting his interest in history and nature; report of the game warden of South Carolina, 1912; minutes of the 1932 meeting of the alumni association of the University of South Carolina; poems by Rice; and pamphlets and articles on natural history.

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John Jackson McSwain papers, 1910-1941 and undated 8.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 6600 Items

Lawyer, Army officer, and U.S. Representative from Greenville, South Carolina. Collection largely consists of letters from McSwain's constituents (1921-1936). Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); Prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain. Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes many speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring.

Collection largely consists of letters from John Jackson McSwain's constituents, dating from 1921 to 1936. Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain.

The correspondence starts with a few letters from 1910, when McSwain began to take tentative steps towards politics. There are letters relating to Dr. James Woodrow, Sept.2, 1910; and to Woodrow Wilson's campaigns for Governor of New Jersey in 1910 and for the presidency in 1912. There are patronage letters in 1912 and 1913, and a cloth portrait of Woodrow Wilson woven at Clemson College, South Carolina, in 1915.

Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring. The latest dates refer to condolences sent following McSwain's death of a heart attack in 1936, and his secretary Dixon Davis's political maneuverings with Joseph Raleigh Bryson following this event.

The digitized cardfiles provide a very detailed discussion of the collection's contents and topics. For access, please consult with a reference archivist.

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John Patrick Grace papers, 1902-1940 26 Linear Feet — 12,082 Items

Politician and journalist, of Charleston, S.C. Personal and legal papers. Includes material on Charleston and South Carolina politics; the Charleston American, a newspaper founded by Grace; anti-English feeling at the time of World War I; American sympathy for Irish nationalism; enforcement of the Espionage Act against Grace for his wartime editorials; land speculation in Florida during the 1920s; Grace's speaking engagements on behalf of Alfred E. Smith (1928); his opposition to Roosevelt's nomination in 1932; and his attitude toward world events in the 1930s.

The Grace papers are divided into several series: Correspondence, Miscellany, Legal and Financial Papers, Clippings and Printed Material, and Volumes.

The bulk of the collection lies in the Correspondence series, dating 1908-1940, with topics ranging from Grace's personal news, business adventures, and his political career. The early letters, pre-1920, are largely concerned with Charleston politics. Correspondence from the mayoralty election of 1915, the election of the U.S. representative from South Carolina in 1916, and the mayoralty election of 1919 all reveal the corruption and violence that regularly accompanied Charleston elections in the early twentieth century. Grace was a candidate for mayor in 1911, 1915, and 1919. He appears to have been considered an upstart in Charleston politics; at least he claimed to be opposed to the rule of the reactionary aristocrats who, he thought, had controlled Charleston. Since Grace was Roman Catholic, religious prejudice was often injected into the elections campaigns in which he was active, particularly for the election of 1919.

The corruption of Charleston elections was also demonstrated by several governors when they called out the militia to keep the peace in Charleston during elections (for example, 1919), by the murder of a Grace man in 1915, and Grace's charge that Francis Marion Whaley bought his seat in the House of Representatives in the election of 1916. This accusation led to a hearing in the House of Representatives, which decided against an investigation, claiming a lack of evidence to support the charge of corruption.

Another large amount of correspondence stems from Grace's publishing of the Charleston American, a daily morning paper begun in 1916. From the many letters concerning the founding and progress of the paper, the problems and great expense connected with the publication of a daily paper become apparent. Also, there are comparisons of the progress of the Charleston American with the established News and Courier.

In his Charleston American editorials, Grace regularly criticized the ongoing war in Europe. His pro-Irish opinions were accompanied by accusations that England had begun the war in order to preserve its naval and commercial superiority. He wrote that the United States had been flooded by British propaganda, and considered British naval policy to be a more flagrant violation of neutrality than German submarine attacks.

Grace wanted the United States to observe strict neutrality, as Wilson had proposed. When the United States entered the war, Grace was extremely angry, calling it "Wilson's War." His editorials were so critical of Wilson and so pro-German that Grace, on the basis of the Espionage Act, was cited to appear for a hearing, and the Charleston American temporarily lost its third class mailing privilege.

Although Grace did not hold office after 1923, he was active in politics until his death. Correspondents included Governors Thomas Gordon McLeod (1923-1927), John Gardiner Richards (1927-1931), Ihra C. Blackwood (1931-1935), and Olin D. Johnston (1925-1939). Grace appeared closest to Richards, asking and receiving many favors. Grace despised Blackwood, however, and denounced him publicly for removing Grace from the state's highway commission.

Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, Grace also corresponded with a number of national politicians. In 1922, he received a letter from his friend and Representative from South Carolina, W. Turner Logan, who spoke of joining the "Bolsheviks, Borah, LaFollette and Frasier," and explained that this alignment was not a third party movement but "simply progressive." Grace also exchanged letters with Millard E. Tydings, James F. Byrnes, Hamilton Fish, Jr., James A. Reed, Pat McCarran, George W. Norris, James E. Murray, Eugene Talmadge, Ellison D. Smith, and William W. Ball.

Grace was active in the presidential election of 1928, and was invited by Tydings to make a series of addresses in behalf of Alfred E. Smith, the Democratic candidate. In the course of this election, some of Grace's letters reveal his political philosophy, and this was elaborated in his letters during the 1930s. In connection with the presidential election of 1932, Grace was sorely disappointed when Franklin D. Roosevelt won the Democratic nomination over Al Smith. Grace accused Roosevelt of being an ingrate and an opportunist, and remained a severe critic of Roosevelt, especially concerning Roosevelt's treatment of the Supreme Court.

Also of interest in correspondence from the 1920s are Grace's speculation in Florida real estate, his losses growing out of the depression, and his opinion (from 1934) as to the causes of the depression.

During the 1930s, Grace wrote at length on world politics. The letters are particularly good for discerning his political philosophy, his reasoning with respect to the entrance of the United States into World War I, and his opinion as to the developments in Europe that led to World War II. While he disapproved of some of Hitler's tactics, Grace wrote in 1938 that Hitler was one of the greatest men of the day. Important also is the long letter from George Norris explaining why he had voted against the entrance of the United States into World War I.

The Legal and Financial Papers series, dated 1885-1939, includes documents connected with the business of the Charleston American, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Co., the Cooper River Bridge Co., the Whaley hearing, and the O.B. Limehouse Case, among others. Cases are arranged alphabetically; the remainder of the series is sorted chronologically. The financial papers also contain many bills and receipts.

The remaining papers are sorted into Miscellany, Clippings, and Printed Material. The Volumes series includes three scrapbooks of newspaper clippings.

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Robert H. Woody papers, 1927-1985. 6 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a professor of history at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscripts, short writings, vitae, certificates, diplomas, committee reports, printed material, photographs, 8 mm films, and VHS tapes. Major subjects include Robert H. Woody, the Civil War, the South, South Carolina, North Carolina, reconstruction, republicans, southern newspapers, biographies, mountain culture, folklore, history instruction, Duke University, the Duke University history department, and the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana. Major correspondents appearing in the collection include: William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, William T. Laprade, Francis Warrenton Dawson, Stanly Godbold, Jr., Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, Stanley Godbold, the Southern Historical Association, and the Historical Society of North Carolina. Some materials are restricted. Materials range in date from 1927 to 1985. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a teacher and historian at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Materials include correspondence with individuals and professional organizations, films, clippings, and writings (including original Civil War correspondence) pertaining to Woody's research, and manuscript materials for biographies of Civil War statesmen and Duke University President William Preston Few. Major correspondents include colleagues at Duke University: Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, and William T. Laprade. Correspondence is ordered alphabetically. Films are 8mm format. Some materials are restricted

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Samuel Dibble papers, 1779-1910 and undated bulk 1855-1900 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,600 Items

Lawyer, politician, and U.S. Representative from Orangeburg, S.C. Correspondence, business and legal papers, and printed matter, mostly dating from 1855-1900, centered on South Carolina history. All pre-1850 papers are legal documents concerned with land surveys and transfers. A few letters written while Dibble was a Confederate soldier relate to the home front; postwar correspondence deals with such matters as phosphate mining, education, professional activities, African Americans in post-Reconstruction politics, and Dibble's opposition to Governor Tillman. Later papers display his expanding activities in banking and railroads. After 1900 the papers concern brother A. C. Dibble, and sons L. V., an insurance agent, and Samuel Jr., a surveyor and civil engineer.

Correspondence, business and legal papers, and printed matter, mostly dating from 1855-1900, centered on South Carolina history. All pre-1850 papers are legal documents concerned with land surveys and transfers. From 1869-1872 there are a number of documents relating to the state's pooicy of buying large estates for resale in small sections; included are descriptions of estates, prices, and approval by state cabinet members. Further light is thrown on this policy by the records of an investigating committee, 1877.

A few letters written while Dibble was a Confederate soldier relate entirely to the home front in S.C. rather than to his service; letters refer to assessments and requisitions. Postwar correspondence deals with such matters as phosphate mining, education, and professional activities. Later papers display Dibble's expanding activities in banking and railroads.

Dibble was state chairman in 1892 of the "Conservative Democracy of S.C." and was leading the opposition to hte renomination of Gov. Tillman. There are a number of undated voter censuses of both black and white voters in various precincts in the Orangeburg County area. In several letters from the 1880s there are comments about the role of African Americans in post-Reconstruction voting and politics.

Dibble was a lawyer for a phosphate mining company, thus there is abundant information on legal cases such as territoriality claims, but also on equipment used, amount mined, and methods of mining. Dibble was often called to legal cases concerning estates, therefore the collection houses the wills of William R. Treadwell (1863), George H. Pooser (1866), David W. Snell (1879), and Chrisian A. Gates. There is also information about the family of Langdon Cheves in letters of Nov. 18, 1879, and March 22, 1879. After 1900 the papers concern brother A. C. Dibble, and sons L. V., an insurance agent, and Samuel Jr., a surveyor and civil engineer.

The miscellaneous papers include surveyors' notebooks, printed legal cases in which Dibble was involved (particularly in the Supreme Court), speeches by members of Congress, Dibble's business notebooks, railroad timetables, and other print material.

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William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated 31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items

Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.