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Anne Firor Scott papers, 1939-2009 19 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The collection contains writings of Anne Firor Scott and materials relating to her academic work in Southern and women's history. The materials primarily refer to her scholarly activities, and include her dissertation, occasional papers, articles, speeches and lectures, book reviews, contracts, conference proceedings and schedules, course materials, newspaper clippings, and other activities related to academia. There is also a file of correspondence written by Anna Lord Strauss (then president of the League of Women Voters) in 1949 and mailed to all members the league. Notes by Scott in this file explain her connection to Strauss, and the circumstances of the correspondence. In addition, there are newspaper articles related to the first and second editions of Scott's book, The Southern Lady. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Preliminary container lists exist for only parts of the collection.

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Charles S. Sydnor papers, 1729-1978 and undated 14.8 Linear Feet — circa 11,159 items

The Charles S. Sydnor Papers roughly span the period 1729-1978, the bulk dated 1923 to 1954. They include correspondence, research notes, writings, printed materials, and clippings, chiefly relating to Sydnor's teaching career at Duke University, as well as at Harvard and Queen's College, Oxford. The collection also includes information about his involvement with various historical associations and committees, including the American Historical Association, Southern Historical Association, North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, and the Advisory Committee of the Office of the Chief of Military History for the United States Army. There is background information pertaining to his various writings, including The Development of Southern Sectionalism (Volume V of the work A History of the South) (Baton Rouge, La., 1948), Gentleman Freeholders: Political Practices in Washington's Virginia (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1952), A Gentleman of the Old Natchez Region: Benjamin L. C. Wailes (Durham, N.C., 1938), Mississippi History (New York, N.Y., 1930), and Slavery in Mississippi (New York, N.Y., 1933). The papers contain notes and examinations for various history courses taught by Sydnor, student roll books, grade books, and papers. Additionally, there are a few notebooks and papers of Sydnor's while he was a student.

Materials relating to Sydnor's teaching career and participation in historical associations are found primarily in the Alphabetical Files Series and the Teaching Files Series. The information about Queen's College, University of Oxford, is located in the Alphabetical Files Series under Oxford. Information pertaining to his writings are found in the Writings and Speeches Series. Sydnor's own student notebooks and papers are found in the Miscellaneous Series. Topics highlighted include the Duke University Department of History during the late 1930s through the early 1950s, (Alphabetical Files Series); the writing and teaching of Southern history, particularly Mississippi history, (Writings and Speeches Series and Teaching Files Series); and the naturalist and planter, Benjamin L. C. Wailes (Writings and Speeches Series). A related collection in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library is the Benjamin L. C. Wailes Papers.

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The Confederate States of America (CSA) was formed in 1861 by eleven states in the southern United States that declared secession from the U.S. The CSA collapsed in 1865 after its defeat in the American Civil War by Union forces. Collection was assembled from various sources and includes a variety of materials originating from administrative bodies within the Confederate States of America, including the Army, Executive Department, Congress, state governments and agencies, and the Navy. In addition to official records, the collection also includes some personal correspondence and miscellany.

The Confederate States of America Collection was assembled from various sources and includes a variety of materials originating from administrative bodies within the Confederate States of America, including the Army, Executive Department, Congress, state governments and agencies, and the Navy. In addition to official records, the collection also includes some personal correspondence and miscellany.

The CSA Congress division contains miscellaneous papers as well as original and typed copies of acts and statutes of the CSA Congress.

The Executive Department papers contain records of various offices of the Cabinet with the respective bureaus under each office, including the Justice Department, Navy Department, Post Office Department, State Department, Treasury Department, and War Department.

Also included are records of various Army units including: Army of Mississippi, Army of Tennessee, Army of Northern Virginia, Department of South Carolina and Georgia, Wheeler's Calvary, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Another group of Army related records is organized by record type and includes hospital records, military telegrams, and Quartermaster records, among others.

State government records exist for Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, and state agency records exist for North Carolina and Georgia and are divided into two groups: the Court Records for the Pamlico District of North Carolina, and the poor relief and claims papers of North Carolina and Georgia.

Miscellany includes soldiers' letters, prison papers, oaths of allegiance, sketch maps, and autographs, as well as a small number of volumes and ledgers.

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Henry Nathaniel Oakes papers, 1904-1974 9.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 5000 Items

Henry Nathaniel Oakes was a minister from North Carolina; he received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1974. Collection consists of research material for and drafts of Oakes's Ph.D. dissertation, which focuses on the career of Robert Elijah Jones (1872—1960), the first African American elected to the episcopacy in the former Methodist Episcopal Church (1920). Oakes's materials document the relationship between Jones and his close friend Booker T. Washington, Jones's accomodationist approach to racial integration, as well as the black struggle for equality in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal Church in the first half of the twentieth century. Among Oakes's research papers are many folders of typed notes excerpting and commenting on Jones's statements made from 1905 to 1920 on abolition, African American business, mob violence and lynching, education, and politics. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Henry Nathaniel Oakes chiefly consist of research material for and drafts of Oakes's 1973 Ph.D. dissertation, which focuses on the career of Robert Elijah Jones (1872—1960), the first African American Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, elected in 1920. Jones was born in Greensboro, North Carolina. Oakes's materials document the relationship between Jones and his close friend Booker T. Washington, Jones's accomodationist approach to racial integration, as well as the black struggle for equality in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal Church in the first half of the twentieth century.

The earliest dates (1904-1940s) derive from photocopied research materials pertaining to the period during which Robert Jones was active, chiefly from Methodist publications, including reports, newsclippings, articles, and correspondence. These materials contain exceprts and notes on comments Jones made from 1905 to 1920 on abolition, African American business, mob violence and lynching, education, and politics. Also among the research papers are typed notes Henry Oakes took on an unidentified work by Robert E. Jones. Typewritten notes are typically annotated with many hand-written comments and underlined passages. Handwritten notes are often found on the backs of re-used elementary school worksheets.

Additional materials in the collection include University of Iowa forms and policies; correspondence between Oakes and members of the Jones family and Univ. of Iowa faculty; a set of typed transcripts of six or seven interviews conducted by Oakes with Jones family members, ministers, and other individuals; a set of black-and-white photographs of Jones, his immediate family, and Church officials; and five microfilm reels.

Mold remediation has been carried out by Conservation staff on selected portions of the collection. To facilitate access to severely damaged items, photocopies are available for use and are housed alongside the originals.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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John Hope Franklin was a celebrated and pioneering historian specializing in Southern and African American history. The papers document his entire career as well as his personal life and political interests: his prolific writings on African American and Southern history; his role as a mentor and colleague; his role in associations such as Phi Beta Kappa, the American Historical Association, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and others; his participation in the civil rights movement, including his work with the NAACP Legal and Educational Defense Fund, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and Justice Thurgood Marshall; and his engagement with numerous civic, community, and educational organizations such as the Board of Foreign Scholarships and Fisk University's Board of Trustees. There is also a significant amount of material from Franklin's work on President Clinton's Advisory Board for the President's Initiative on Race in 1997 and 1998. Items in the collection include files of correspondence in original order; research sources and notes; writings by and about Franklin; materials relating to family history; papers and diaries of other family members, including his father, and wife, Aurelia; printed material; event folders; many informal and publicity photographs; video and sound recordings; and awards and other memorabilia. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The John Hope Franklin papers document the whole of Franklin's professional career as a historian, as well as his personal life, early student years, and political interests. Collection materials include correspondence, research materials assembled by Franklin, writings by and about Franklin, drafts of writings, materials relating to family history, printed material, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, clippings, photographs, video and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts. The collection was acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Academics series chronicles Franklin's career as a professor of history. It includes materials documenting his role as a mentor and advisor to numerous undergraduate and graduate students, his lecture notes and other classroom materials, and his administrative and committee work at various institutions, including Brooklyn College, University of Chicago, and Duke University. Portions of this series are restricted.

The series on the Advisory Board for the President's Initiative on Race contains items Franklin gathered during his work on President Clinton's race initiative, "One America in the 21st Century." The bulk of the series dates from the year-long work of the Advisory Board, from 1997 to 1998, and primarily comprises items sent to the Board for consideration in its work, meeting materials, publicity, and scholarly materials.

The videos and sound recordings in the Audiovisual series were created or assembled by John Hope Franklin. The series has been arranged into three subseries: ABPIR Materials, Recordings of Franklin, and Recordings of Others. Originals in the Audiovisual Materials Series are closed to use. Use copies are available for some items. Please contact Research Services staff in advance before coming to use this series.

The Correspondence series is one of the largest series in the collection, and comprises personal and professional correspondence received and sent by Franklin throughout his adult life.

The Engagements series includes invitations, correspondence, programs, and itineraries related to Franklin's participation in scholarly, civic, and social events. These materials have been arranged chronologically.

Franklin's Honors and Awards series includes certificates and diplomas, as well as logistical and administrative documentation for many of the awards ceremonies. The series is divided into Honorary Degrees and General Awards, both sorted in chronological order.

The Personal and Family Materials series contains the earliest items in the collection, with materials from Franklin's parents and grandparents. It includes files documenting Franklin's life and interests outside of his scholarship and public service. Materials are arranged by family member, with Franklin's wife, Aurelia, and his father, Buck Colbert Franklin, heavily represented. Also contains papers related to Theodore Currier, Franklin's mentor; John Hope eventually served as an executor of his estate.

The Research, Biographical, and Subject Files series contains newspaper clippings, subject files, travel guides, and photocopies of Franklin's FBI file. Also contains publicity and newspaper coverage of Franklin's many interviews and public appearances throughout the twentieth century.

The large Service series includes files acquired through Franklin's government, professional, and community service with various organizations and projects. Materials range from the early 1950s through the 2000s and are arranged alphabetically by organization or project name.

Franklin's prolific writing career is documented in the Writings series, which includes materials on his many books, articles, speeches, book reviews, essays, interviews, and other works, many unpublished. A portion of this series is restricted; please contact the Rubenstein Library for more information.

The Writings by Others series documents the ongoing relationship Franklin had with other authors and historians. It includes correspondence, drafts, and printed materials. Files are arranged alphabetically by author.

Finally, the Courtland Cox papers is a series of manuscripts belonging to Cox, a civil rights activist, collected by Franklin as supporting materials for a research project. The Rubenstein Library also holds a separate collection of Cox papers chiefly relating to his work with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

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Mattie Underwood Russell (1915-1988) was Curator of the Duke University Manuscripts Department from 1952 to 1985. During these years, Russell became a nationally-recognized archivist, and increased the number of collections, implemented a cataloging system, and encouraged researchers to use the materials in the Manuscripts Department. The Mattie Underwood Russell Papers include correspondence, reports, writings, subject files, memoranda, and other materials related to Russell's career at Duke University. Major subjects include archival administration, archival education, American history, southern history, the Duke University administration, and the Nixon presidential library controversy at Duke University. English.

The Mattie Underwood Russell Papers include correspondence, reports, writings, subject files, memoranda, and other materials related to Russell's career at Duke University. The collection is divided into five series. The first series, Correspondence, includes both personal and professional materials. In arranging the correspondence, Russell included genealogy, printed material, and other material she felt were pertinent to the correspondence. The series is arranged chronologically. The second series, Subjects, is arranged alphabetically, and includes information about Russell's professional interests as well as biographical and other personal information. Course Materials, the next series, includes information collected during Russell's teaching career in the School of Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The materials are arranged alphabetically by subject. The fourth series, Writings, includes addresses, articles, and other pieces written by Russell. The series is divided into "Addresses and Lectures" and "Writings," and materials are arranged alphabetically into these categories. The last series is the Nixon Presidential Library series, which includes a proposal, correspondence, reports, and committee materials.

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Career military officer, noted for his service in the horse artillery in the Union Army cavalry during the Civil War. Collection comprises Tidball's manuscript (5 pgs.) on poor whites in the South. He divided his study regionally, discussing working class whites on the Georgia coast versus those in the southern Alleghenies. He outlined the impact of slavery, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction period on this class of people. Includes a one-page transcription.

Collection comprises Tidball's manuscript (5 pgs.) on poor whites in the South. He divided his study regionally, discussing working class whites on the Georgia coast versus those in the southern Alleghenies. He outlined the impact of slavery, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction period on this class of people. Includes a one-page transcription.

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Southern Lesbian-Feminist Activist Herstory Project, 2011-2015 10 Gigabytes — MP3, WAV, WMA, PDF, and DOC files. — 0.3 Linear Feet — 1 box

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Forty-four digital audio oral history interviews documenting lesbian feminist activism in the South focused on the period 1968-1994.

Forty-four digital audio oral history interviews created by Charlene Ball, Kate Ellison, Barbara Esrig, Barbara Ester, Merril Mushroom, and Rose Norman, documenting lesbian feminist activism in the South focused on the period 1968-1994. The interviews were created in 2011-2015, and are accompanied by digital notes and/or transcripts, which often contain photographs.

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Wendell Holmes Stephenson papers, 1820-1968 34.6 Linear Feet — circa 25,950

The papers of Wendell Holmes Stephenson span the years 1820-1968, but the bulk of the materials date from 1922 to 1968. They consist of correspondence, writings and speeches, research and teaching material, and subject files. The collection primarily concerns Stephenson's career as a university professor, historian and author, and editor of historical journals. His field was Southern history but included American history, and his interests spanned the colonial period to the 20th century.

The beginnings of Stephenson's career are documented in a limited number of letters, writings, and notes dating from his undergraduate studies at Indiana University and his graduate work at the University of Michigan in the 1920s. These materials are scattered principally in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Teaching Materials series.

The materials about his career as teacher, editor, and historical writer from the 1920s to the 1960s are not neatly segregated into particular series. The Journal of Southern History Series does record the bulk of his work with that publication, but information about particular persons, topics, and institutions is often available in more than one series, sometimes in all of them.

The Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Teaching Material, and Research and Bibliographical Notes series span Stephenson's career from the 1920s to the 1960s. The Correspondence Series is considerably more extensive than the other series. Information about individuals, schools, associations, and publishers is principally filed in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Teaching Material series. The Research and Bibliographical Notes series contains Stephenson's research notes about persons, places, and topics in Southern and American history, but additional notes and information about them may also appear in other series.

Stephenson was the first editor of the Journal of Southern History that began publication in 1935. Correspondence files are extensive, and some subject files are also available. The papers document the operations of the Journal during Stephenson's editorship, 1935-1941, but also to a limited extent as late as 1944 and in the years prior to the inception of publication. The activity recorded ranges from routine business to dealings with the principal scholars in the field. What Southern history was during this period and who was doing research and writing is amply documented.

Stephenson was later the editor of another important journal, the Mississippi Valley Historical Review, during 1946-1953. Files under its name are in the Correspondence and Subject Files series. However, there are many more files in the Correspondence Series because he integrated his editorial files into his other correspondence. Material about the Review is not confined to the years of Stephenson's editorship.

Manuscripts of the articles and books of various historians are sometimes included in their files in the Journal of Southern History, Subject Files, and Correspondence series. In most cases the presence of these writings is related to Stephenson's editorial work, but some were filed because he was interested in the work of earlier historians.