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Betsy Gamble Hansen was an author and Duke University alumna. In 2000, she founded the Oglethorpe University Women's Network, and she belonged to Duke University's Council on Women's Studies for three years. The Betsy Gamble Hansen Papers include drafts of and papers related to Gamble's writings, especially related to her book, Portals, Menzies family correspondence, clippings, and other papers. Materials range in date from 1902 to 2003, with the bulk being from 1902-1960 and 1996-2003.

The Betsy Gamble Hansen papers are organized into two series. The Writings series includes drafts of Hansen's 2003 novel Portals, iterations of which existed under the titles A Communion of Saints, A Gathering of Saints and Sinners, The Hawk and the Myna Bird, and Tapestry Tales. Also included in this series are papers related to the publication of the book, including publishing contracts, typeface samples, prospectuses, copyright forms, and estimates. The Menzies Family correspondence and other papers series contains letters received by Hansen's grandmother, E.B. Menzies, of Hickory, North Carolina, and her immediate family, clippings, and other papers. The bulk of the correspondence in this series was written by Menzies's sons, Bruce, George, and Tom Menzies, and her daughters Mary Stuart Menzies Tarrant and Jane Menzies Gamble (Betsy Gamble Hansen's mother). Other frequent correspondents include Tom's wife, Frances Menzies, and George's wife, Betty Menzies. Also included are birthday cards, Christmas cards, and letters for E.B. Menzies from friends. Two folders labeled "Family Correspondence" consist of correspondence between E.B. Menzies's children and their spouses. Peppered throughout these folders are letters from E.B. Menzie's grandchildren, including Betsy Gamble Hansen.

Mrs. E. B. Menzies was born Reesie Tipton Warren in 1880 in Emory, Virignia and died in 1961. She lived most of her life in Hickory, NC. She married Edward Bruce Menzies in 1902, and they remained together until Edward died in 1924. Most of the pre-1930 correspondence in the collection consists of letters from E.B. Menzies's extended family and a few letters from her children while away at camp. The children wrote infrequently in the 1930s. During this time Tom, George, and Bruce traveled across the country from their hometown of Hickory, North Carolina, in search of work, while Jane and Mary Stuart remained at home. From 1932-1935, the three men each attended the Colorado School of Mines and performed construction work for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) project to build the Hoover Dam, then held temporary jobs in several different cities before settling in California. Tom and Bruce attended college while George appears to have continued working.

During World War II, each of E.B. Menzies's sons enlisted as United States Navy Seabees in the Pacific Theater, and began to write home much more frequently. Tom graduated in 1942 and was immediately subject to the draft, while Bruce and George began service several months later. None of the three men appear to have seen much conflict, and each survived the war unharmed, although Bruce did stay in a Navy Hospital for some time, apparently due to a stomach illness. Jane and Mary Stuart kept in frequent contact with their brothers throughout the war. All three men were discharged by 1945.

In the late 1940s and 1950s, each of E.B. Menzies's sons settled in California with their wives and children. George began working for a rail line, Tom took a job at a mill, and Bruce sold insurance. E.B. Menzies moved to California to teach for two years before moving back to North Carolina. Each of her children kept in regular correspondence with her throughout the 1950s, but the letters stop in 1961, when E.B. Menzies died.

In addition to the correspondence in this series, this series contains clippings and other papers compiled by E.B. Menzies, including a small amount of financial papers, prescriptions, and materials relating to her children.

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Edgar Tristram Thompson papers, 1915 - 1985 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Edgar Tristram Thompson taught Sociology at Duke University from 1937 until his retirement in 1970. The papers include correspondence with Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen; teaching materials from undergraduate and graduate courses in race relations, religion, and social anthropology; lecture notes from Thompson's mentor and sociology instructor Robert E. Park; research on plantations in Hawaii and in Africa as the Hugh le May Fellow at Rhodes University; development and operations of a Black Studies program and Center for Southern Studies at Duke University; short papers discussing race relations at Duke University and racial identity; autobiographical histories of Thompson's students; manuscripts for many books on race relations; records of participation in Alpha Kappa Delta and American Sociological Association conferences; a campus-wide graffiti survey; and addresses to the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham. English.

The material in this collection addresses American race relations and scholarly treatment of race from about 1940 to 1970. The bulk of the records date from 1920 to 1970. Included are manuscripts of papers by Thompson, his thesis, a bound volume of selected writings, personal and professional correspondence, printed matter, research notes, proofs, departmental budgets and other materials relating to the study and teaching of sociology. Primary sources include handwritten autobiographical histories written by African American students and surveys from a nationwide graffiti project. Major subjects in the manuscripts include race relations in the United States and in other countries, the South, religion in the South, international plantation systems, and sociological anthropology. There is also a small amount of material on the sociology of language. Also included are histories of the Department of Sociology, articles presented in symposia and conferences by Thompson, correspondence concerning the development, establishment, and operations of the Duke Center for Southern Studies (1965 to 1969) and the formation of a Black Studies program (1969). There are also papers from the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham from 1945. Other materials include newspaper articles which address problems and violence in race relations and publicity of race relations events at Duke.

In addition to scholarly topics in sociology, this collection introduces perspectives on race relations at Duke University during the politically active 1960s and 1970s. There are a number of articles about Duke-sponsored race relations learning activities. Thompson was a strong advocate of learning about personal racial heritage and understanding social structures and events though that frame. He tried for many years, without success, to gain the Ford Foundation's sponsorship of race relations conferences and seminars; this topic received much attention from scholars in sociology. Correspondents include contemporary sociologists Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen. Thompson's greatest influence was Robert E. Park, a former instructor who was also an expert on race relations theory and plantation systems.

The Edgar T. Thompson papers were originally unorganized. Folders contained many types of documents covering a variety of topics and were loosely grouped by date according to year of accession of the material. The folders have since been further grouped into several series, and further by date within each series, where applicable. Many items in this collection are undated. A list of Thompson's writing can be found at the front of the bound volume The Papers of Dr. Edgar T. Thompson.

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Farmer, banker, and Union Cavalry officer of Caledonia, Minnesota. Collection includes correspondence, diaries, writings, legal documents, printed material, record books, scrapbooks, and photographs, chiefly relating to Marshall's military service with Brackett's Battalion, Minnesota Cavalry, in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama (1862-1864) and on the Northwest Indian expedition (1864-1865). Diaries include comments on his immigration from Brockton, MA to Minnesota in 1853, and on secessionist spirit in Texas, 1859-1860. Letters from his sister reflect impact of immigrants on Brockton, 1890-1910. Includes material documenting aspects of the Dakota Territory in the 1860s; Plains Indians; Red River carts; the impact of the Civil War on southern unionists, middle Tennessee, and African Americans; religion; education; the status of women; towns in southeastern New England, upper Middle West, Tennessee, and Mississippi River Valley; and Ignatius Donnelly, Horace Mann, and William T. Sherman.

The papers of Eugene Marshall (1832-1919) span 1847-1962 and consist primarily of diaries kept by Marshall during his military service in the Civil and Sioux Wars and correspondence exchanged with his sister, Olive (Mrs. Frederick Trow). The collection is divided into the following series: the Diaries (1851-1895); Correspondence and other documents (1847-1918; 1958-1962); Writings, both printed and manuscript, including poetry, speeches, newspaper articles, and letters to the editor (1863-1918 and undated); Genealogy of Marshall and related families; Volumes and Scrapbooks (1858-1908); Photographs (1858-1913 and undated); and a small folder of miscellaneous material. There is also an oversize folder in the collection, which contains a certificate attesting to Marshall's membership in the Minnesota chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution. The collection also includes one of the Indian arrows that wounded Marshall during the campaign of 1864.

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Hemphill Family papers, 1784-1958 30 Linear Feet — 12,196 Items

Hemphill family of South Carolina. Collection includes correspondence, sermons, and other papers, of William Ramsey Hemphill, Presbyterian minister, and of his sons, James Calvin Hemphill and Robert Reid Hemphill, newspaper editors. The material relates to national, South Carolina, and Texas politics; slavery; reform movements (including anti-slavery and temperance); politics and military campaigns in the Confederacy; Reconstruction; the race situation; and journalism. Correspondents include William Jennings Bryan, Andrew Carnegie, Champ Clark, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, Jefferson Davis, Francis W. Dawson, Sr., Ellen Glasgow, Carter Glass, Henry P. Grady, Wade Hampton, George Swinton Legaré, William G. McAdoo, William G. McCabe, Adolph S. Ochs, George Washington Ochs, James L. Orr, Walter Hines Page, Joseph Pulitzer, Whitelaw Reid, William Howard Taft, Benjamin R. Tillman, Joseph P. Tumulty, Oscar W. Underwood, Oswald Garrison Villard, Booker T. Washington, and Henry Watterson.

The first several letters of this collection are largely those of the John Hemphill (1761-1832). There are several boxes of Associate Reformed Presbyterian sermons, and many of the earlier letters relate to affairs of that church in South Carolina, including many letters from other ministers of that faith to William Ramsey Hemphill. Three sermons and a pastoral letter of William Ramsey, as well as letters from N.M. Gordon, William W. Patton, Matthew Linn, Samuel Taggart, James Hemphill, and Robert C. Grier to him, concern the question of slavery. These letters are by other A.R.P. ministers and relatives.

Along with religious correspondence, there are letters discussing: naturalization laws in force in 1807; Aaron Burr's expedition; anti-Masonic meetings in Alabama in 1820; nullification sentiment in South Carolina in 1832 and anti-nullification sentiment in North Carolina as expressed in a letter from 1833; pro-slavery views; resignation of Thomas Cooper as president of South Carolina College; movement of slaves through Augusta, Georgia, in 1834-1835; expedition of 1836 against the Seminoles of Florida; affairs at South Carolina College; abolition petitions in Congress in 1836; attempts to link Charleston with Cincinnati by rail; presidential campaign of 1840; Catholic support of Temperance in Philadelphia in 1840, and other aspects of the Temperance movement; movement of John Hemphill to Texas in 1838 and his elevation to the supreme court of that state in 1840; African Colonization Society; John Hemphill's service with an expedition against the Mexicans in 1843; encounter with Sam Houston and his wife in 1845; sending of missionaries to Liberia; establishment of a mail steamship line from Charleston to Havana; Calhoun and Clay in 1849; Erskine College and Erskine Theological Seminary; Stockton, California, and vicinity in 1851, as described by Robert King Reid (he and John Y. Lind had gone to California from South Carolina. He was elected resident physician at the California state hospital, and Lind was elected to the California senate); American Colonization Society; presidential election of 1856; slavery controversy in Kansas and land prices there; abolition; secession; reception in the South of the speeches of Stephen Douglas and reception in the North of William L. Yancey's speeches; the Civil War; war activities of women in Chester, South Carolina in 1862; Henry S. Foote's opinion in 1862 of Bragg's campaign; battle of Chancellorsville; hardships at home; Copperheads; election of Jas. H. Hemphill in 1865 to the South Carolina constitutional convention and the work of that body; movement of James Hemphill's former slaves; bankruptcy of South Carolina in 1865 (James Hemphill was chairman of the finance committee of the senate of that state in 1865); difficulties of Robert Nixon Hemphill in getting freedmen to sign work contracts; hard times in Reconstruction; the Ku Klux Klan activities around Blackstock, South Carolina, in 1871; armed fight between Democrats and Republicans during an election in Kentucky in 1871; the Panic of 1873; Wade Hampton's administration as governor; organization of a militia company in South Carolina; politics of that state in the 1870s; and the state debt of South Carolina.

The papers following the 1870s are largely those of James Calvin Hemphill's career. The latter portion of the collection includes quite a number of letters from William Howard Taft and Daniel H. Chamberlain, both of whom were friends of J.C. Hemphill; from Mrs. Francis W. Dawson I; and from various members of the Hemphill family. There is also a considerable quantity of papers of Robert Reid Hemphill, second son of William Ramsey and Hannah Smith (Lind) Hemphill.

The significant subjects treated in the latter part of the collection are: South Carolina politics in the 1880s; presidential election of 1884; Benjamin R. Tillman and the attitude of Francis W. Dalton I, editor of the Charleston News and Courier before his death in 1888, as well as the attitude of others toward Tillman; the Charleston earthquake of 1886; Theodore Roosevelt; the murder of F.W. Dawson, Sr., in 1888; Hugh S. Thompson's opinion of Roosevelt and Charles Lyman, his fellow members in the Civil Service Commission; illness of Henry W. Grady in 1889; South Carolina politics in the 1890s; colonization of African Americans in Africa; presidential election of 1892; woman suffrage, as part of a bill introduced in the South Carolina senate by Robert Reid Hemphill in 1892; race of John Gary Evans in 1894; presidential campaign of 1896; the Dispensary Law; John L. McLaurin's race for the Senate in 1897; railroads (mentioned occasionally); Gridiron Club; presidential election of 1900; McKinley's "imperialistic policy"; Walter H. Page's opinion of Ellen Glasgow's novel; William McNeill Whistler; Edward W. Blyden's opposition to the miscegenation of black people; establishment of a naval station at Charleston; the South Carolina Inter-State and West Indian Exposition; the appointment of Dr. Crum, an African American, as collector at the port of Charleston; murder of N.G. Gonzales; Joseph Pulitzer's plan to establish a school of journalism at Columbia University; experiences of Robert G. Hemphill as a teacher in Monroe, Georgia; Grover Cleveland; the presidential election of 1904; M. Storey's opposition to Harvard's giving Henry Cabot Lodge an honorary LL.D.; Oswald Garrison Villard; the visit in 1904 by R.W. Gilder with Varina (Howell) Davis; the Ogden Movement; Ludwig Lewishon; Men of Mark in South Carolina, edited by James Calvin Hemphill; Booker T. Washington; race relations in the Mississippi delta in 1905; St. Andrew's Society of Charleston; William L. Hemphill's experiences as an engineer in tin mines in Bolivia; meeting of the Southern Immigration and Industrial Association in Birmingham in 1907; Uncle Joe Cannon's Boot Fund; George Harvey; Joseph Pulitzer; R. Goodwyn Rhett; William Howard Taft; the American Commission to Liberia in 1909; Everett G. Hill's views on Jefferson Davis; the history of Liberia and race relations there; William Jennings Bryan; "yellow journalism"; W.E.B. Dubois; possible U.S. intervention in 1911 in Mexico; Woodrow Wilson; James Cannon, Jr.; Taft's view on the tariff; suit of Ambrose E. Gonzales and J.C. Hemphill vs. D.A. Tompkins, George Stephens, and W.H. Wood; segregation in Balitimore and Washington; prohibition; World War I; League to Enforce Peace; the Alexandria Gazette; Josephus Daniels; the American Motion Picture Corporation; the life of Daniel H. Chamberlain; and John Sharp Williams' description of Key Pittman.

Other papers include invitations and calling cards; other miscellaneous printed material; several boxes of copies of editorials and speeches; and bills and receipts.

The volumes include: a journal (author unknown) of a trip to Europe in 1905; letterbooks running from 1887 to 1903; scrapbooks of newspaper clippings from 1887 to 1916. Several scrapbooks related to James Calvin Hemphill's involvement in the South Carolina Inter-State and West Indian Exposition, the bulk dating from 1901-1902.

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James T. Sears papers, 1918-2011 and undated, bulk 1950-2004 138 Linear Feet — 317 boxes — 86,700 Items

Educator, gay rights activist, and author of many works on sexuality, identity, and sex education, and the history of homosexuality and the gay rights movement in the United States. The James T. Sears Papers span the dates 1918-2011, with the bulk of the material covering the period between 1950 and 2004. The papers are arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Material; Other Activities; Personal Papers; Photographic Material; Professional Papers; the largest series, Research and Writings; Jack Nichols Papers; and Oversize Material. The Research and Writings series is divided into subseries for major works by Sears, as well as subseries for other writings and editorial work, research files, and a small set of writings by other individuals. Formats include but are not limited to correspondence, research files, writings, interviews, recordings, serials and newspapers, photographs, and diaries. The collection also houses the personal papers of Hal Call (1917-2000) and Jack Nichols (1938-2005), both early activists for gay rights. Taken as a whole, the collection offers a deep and rich source of information on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, especially in the South, and its representation in literature and in the press, both positive and negative; the history of the gay rights movement in the U.S. and abroad, including the evolution of organizations such as the Mattachine Society and related gay movement publications; sexuality studies in the U.S. and teaching sexuality in primary and secondary classrooms; gays in the military; drag queen, lesbian, and bisexual communities; and many other topics relevant to sexual identity in society.

The James T. Sears Papers span the dates 1918-2008, with the bulk of the material covering the period between 1950 and 2004, and are arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Material; Other Activities; Personal Papers; Photographic Material; Professional Papers; the largest series, Research and Writings; Jack Nichols Papers Series; and Oversize Material, which contains chiefly newspapers and other large-format serials. The Research and Writings series, the largest in the collection, is divided into subseries for each of Sears' major works; in addition, there are other large subseries for Sears' other writings and editorial work, research files, and a small set of writings by other individuals.

The collection documents the career and life of a gay rights activist, educator, and author who has performed ground-breaking research on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, and the teaching of human sexuality in the classroom. The evolution and publication of Sears' major book-length works, articles, and other editorial work is fully documented in this collection in the form of drafts, correspondence, recorded and transcribed oral histories, many research files, and a wide variety of images and recordings. Sears' professional papers contain teaching and course materials as well as files on publicity, speeches, and other activities. Sears also worked as a journal and book editor, thus the collection houses various iterations of authors' accepted work along with Sears' line edits and final publications. Many electronic files accompanied the research, writing, and teaching files; these have been archived on the library's server. An extensive collection of audiovisual materials includes videos, sound recordings, and other media either assembled through Sears' research and teaching activities, or acquired from other sources (note: original recordings are closed to use; unless otherwise noted, listening or viewing copies must be made for research access).

The collection also houses the personal papers of Hal Call (1917-2000) and Jack Nichols (1938-2005), authors and early activists for gay rights. These two large sub-collections contain writings, correspondence, research files, diaries, audiovisual material (separated and removed to the Audiovisual Series), and photographs.

Taken as a whole, the James T. Sears Papers offer a rich source of primary documents and information on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, especially in the South, and its representation in literature and in the press, both positive and negative. The collection also provides extensive documentation on the history of the gay rights movement in the U.S. and abroad, including the evolution of organizations such as the Mattachine Society and related gay movement publications; sexuality studies in the U.S. and teaching sexuality in primary and secondary classrooms; gays in the military; drag queen, lesbian, and bisexual communities; and many other topics relevant to sexual identity in society. The collection also include anthropological field notes of Sears' extensive research and travels in the Philippines related to sexualities and sex education.

Consent forms signed by individuals whose interviews or images were recorded for possible use in publications are sometimes filed with other records relevant to that publication; oftentimes, however, permissions may have been filed in the Research Permissions Subseries box in the Research and Writings Series, or have not been located in the collection. Researchers wishing to publish information on individuals represented in the Sears Papers must have in hand the consent forms, or obtain permission from the individuals.

For more details on the contents and arrangement of individual series or subseries in the Sears Papers, see the series and subseries descriptions that follow.

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John Moses photographs, 1974-1993 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 33 items — 31 prints and 2 typed manuscripts

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South. Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," he photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by. The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, North Carolina pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South.

Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," Moses photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by.

The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. The description mentions oral histories conducted by Moses; these audio materials are not currently part of the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Margaret Sartor photographs and papers, 1966-2003 14.5 Linear Feet — 545 Items

Margaret Sartor is a photographer and instructor at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies. Her Photographs and Papers collection includes photographs of the American South, and some materials from her book project on William Gedney.

The 2001 Accession (2001-0074) (260 items; 9 lin. ft.; dated 1985-2000) contains black-and-white prints (16x20 and 11x14) by Sartor, focusing especially on home, family, and suburban life in the American South.

The 2002 addition (02-083) (38 items, 3 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2001) contains thirty-eight 16x20 black-and-white photographs printed by Sartor in 2001 from negatives shot 1984-2001. Focus is on home, family, and suburban life in the American South.

The 2003 addition (03-121) (47 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1987-2003) comprises forty-seven exhibition quality black-and-white 16x20 prints by Sartor, shot between 1987 and 2003, but mostly printed in 2002 and 2003. Subjects include women and family in the suburban South.

The 2015 addition consists of materials relating to Sartor's book, What Was True: The Photographs and Notebooks of William Gedney, published in 2000. This materials has been arranged into a Book Projects series.

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Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2019 22.5 Linear Feet — 5 upright boxes; 1 record carton; 25 flat boxes; 2 shoeboxes; 2 oversize folders — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files

Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of the students' multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Subjects include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written These and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs.

Some authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; not all graduates of the MFA EDA program submitted their work for inclusion in this archive.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Career military officer, noted for his service in the horse artillery in the Union Army cavalry during the Civil War. Collection comprises Tidball's manuscript (5 pgs.) on poor whites in the South. He divided his study regionally, discussing working class whites on the Georgia coast versus those in the southern Alleghenies. He outlined the impact of slavery, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction period on this class of people. Includes a one-page transcription.

Collection comprises Tidball's manuscript (5 pgs.) on poor whites in the South. He divided his study regionally, discussing working class whites on the Georgia coast versus those in the southern Alleghenies. He outlined the impact of slavery, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction period on this class of people. Includes a one-page transcription.

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Rick Lang photographs of Florida and other Southern states, 1985-2013 12 Linear Feet — 13 boxes — 229 photographic prints; 258 contact sheets; approximately 3100 negatives; approximately 40 printed items; 130 digital files

Photographer and faculty member at the Creadlé School of Art, Winter Park, Florida. Collection comprises 229 large-format black-and-white photographs by Rick Lang, documenting the communities and landscapes of the American South, with an emphasis on roadside signs, small businesses, and weathered buildings. While the majority of the images were taken in Florida, there also many taken in other states throughout the South, particularly in Louisiana. There are also a few from New Mexico and Arizona. Photographic processes include gelatin silver and pigmented inkjet prints. Print sizes are chiefly 11x14, 13x19, and 16x20 inches, and were printed and signed by the photographer. Accompanying the prints are approximately 3100 negatives and 258 contact sheets linked by unique identification numbers. In addition there is a small amount of print materials chiefly associated with his solo and group exhibits, and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013. Also includes digital files of images. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains 229 black-and-white gelatin silver or inkjet large-format prints by photographer Rick Lang, documenting the communities and landscapes of Florida and other Southern states; there are also a few images taken in New Mexico and Arizona. Prints are typically sized 11x14, 13x19, and 16x20 inches, and are signed and printed by Lang. About half are housed in 16x20 and 20x24 inch window mats. The prints are arranged in number sequence as assigned by Lang; the negatives and contact sheets are linked by contact sheet numbers which are noted in each print entry in this collection guide.

Lang's work focuses chiefly on scenes of weathered buildings and businesses - stores, motels, bars, alligator farms, and tourist shops - along the back roads of the South; there are also many photographs of signs and graffiti. Few if any people are present. Among the exceptions is a sequence of images of protesters in Florida demonstrating against censorship and other issues.

Accompanying the prints is a full set of negatives and contact sheets, with many additional images that are not present in the large-format series. There is also a small amount of printed materials chiefly associated with his solo and group exhibits, and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013. Three photograph books offer images not present in this collection of people in the Florida communities where Lang lived and worked. Also includes digital files of about 111 selected images.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.