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Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Missing Title
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in those communities in the 1940's and 1950's, which may be valuable to the sociologist or historian studying Appalachia or the rural South.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and excellent pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

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Cannon Mills records, 1836-1983 160 Linear Feet — Approximately 63,000 items

The Cannon Mills Records, a textile manufacturer, span the years 1836-1983, although the bulk occurs during 1887-1983. Files and account books concern the operations of Cannon Manufacturing Company and its successor in 1928, Cannon Mills, its subsidiary and associated textile mills, related business interests, and community involvement. The records include correspondence, volumes, memoranda, statistical compilations, reports, printed material, and financial and legal documents.

In 1898 Cannon Manufacturing Company switched to towel manufacturing, and in later years the product line expanded into blankets. In 1971 sales exceeded $305 million, and the company dominated over 50% of the country's towel business and over 20% of the sheet business.

Important topics include the textile industry, economic conditions related to the textile industry, textile marketing and sales, state and national textile industry associations and public and governmental relations; textile industry consolidation; textile equipment and manufacturers; textile production and costs; an antebellum textile mill; and the Cannon, Patterson, Swink, Odell, Barringer, Johnston, Murdoch, and other families who were owners and managers of one or more of the textile mills.

Topics and materials related to personnel are millworkers (both men and women), child labor (both girls and boys), employee retirement plans, the Textile Workers Union of America, time books, employee injuries, company mercantile stores, and mill houses and villages.

Other business activities involved building construction, architects, and contractors; investment in securities and commodities; advertising; taxation; stock and stockholders (both men and women); corporate directors; insurance; bankruptcy and bad debts; cotton brokers; cotton buying and the cotton market; dividends; banks and banking; mill superintendents' records; real estate; lawsuits, one involving racial discrimination; and estate settlements.

Community relations are evident in records relating to churches, schools, the Y.M.C.A., Freemasons, philanthropy to local organizations, and secondary boarding schools in North Carolina and the inception of agricultural training for boys and home economics for girls. The city of Kannapolis, N.C., in which the main offices of Cannon were located, was a particular focus of company interest.

There are record series for the nine companies that were consolidated in 1928 to form Cannon Mills: Cannon Manufacturing Company, Cabarrus Cotton Mills, Barringer Manufacturing Company, Franklin Cotton Mills, Gibson Manufacturing Company, Kesler Manufacturing Company, Patterson Manufacturing Company, Norcott Mills Company, and Hobarton Manufacturing Company. These mills were all in the western Piedmont of North Carolina.

A number of other mills, owned by or associated with the Cannons or Cannon Mills, had a separate existence in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama. Those mills, represented in this collection by series, include Central Mills, Central, S.C.; Bloomfield Manufacturing Co., Statesville, N.C.; Brown Manufacturing Co., Concord, N.C.; Roberta Manufacturing Co., Cabarrus County, N.C.; Imperial Cotton Mills, Eatonton, Georgia; Social Circle Cotton Mills, Walton County, Georgia, Swink Manufacturing Company, Rowan County, N.C.; Travora Textiles, Graham and Haw River, N.C.; Windemere Knitting Mills, Albemarle, N.C.; and Wiscassett Mills, Albemarle, N.C. Other mills, not represented here by series, were related to the Cannon group, and information about them occasionally appears in the collection. These firms include: Amazon Cotton Mills, Thomasville, N.C.; Durham Hosiery Mills; Efird Manufacturing Co., Albemarle, N.C.; Tuscarora Cotton Mill, Mt. Pleasant, N.C.; Buck Creek Cotton Mills, Siluria, Ala.; and Paola Cotton Mills, Statesville, N.C.

Basic information about these textile mills can be found in the annual volumes of Davidson's Textile Blue Book. The size and products of many of the factories varied over the years.

The huge Cannon corporation also had related business interests and community involvements that are represented by organizations and record series in this collection. They include: Cannon Mills, Inc., the selling agency in New York City; Cannon of West Coast, Inc.; L. T. Barringer and Co., a cotton brokerage firm in Memphis, Tennessee; the Brown-Roberta Foundation, a community philanthropy; J. A. Skipwith and Co., cotton brokers at Concord, N.C.; Klumac Cotton Mills, Salisbury, N.C.; P. M. Morris Real Estate Company, Concord, N.C.; Rowan County Farm Life School; and the Trading and Commission Company, a selling agency and holding company.

The series in this collection represent executives, offices, a department, subsidiary companies, affiliated companies, and related businesses and organizations. The general arrangement of the 47 series is: reference information; members of the Cannon family; executive offices; executives; a department; and numerous companies, businesses, and organizations, these arranged mostly alphabetically.

The surviving files and volumes represent only a small percentage of the original archives. Some parts of the company have considerable papers in this collection, but no series is anywhere near complete. Some series are quite small. Record survival was random, but many important and useful files and account books are available.

Information about particular topics, companies, and individuals is often scattered in a number of series in this collection, and the container list serves as a guide to many of them. It should be remembered that company activities may be reflected by bookkeeping entries in the account books whether or not relevant files are available. Because of the interlocking relationships of the various companies, information about one firm may not be exclusive to its own series.

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Lawyer and philanthropist of Peekskill, N.Y. Personal, business, political, and philanthropic correspondence (chiefly 1925-1938), relating to Pugsley's political work for the Democratic Party, his philanthropic activities, his efforts to promote better understanding and knowledge of international affairs, U.S. and New York politics (1910-1938), and U.S. economic conditions (1920s and 1930s). Correspondents include Roscoe Pound and William Howard Taft.

Correspondence, legal papers, press releases, printed material and other miscellaneous papers of Chester DeWitt Pugsley spanning the years 1873-1938, with the majority of the material dating from 1925-1938. Extensive personal, business, political, and philanthropic correspondence (chiefly 1925-1938), relates to Pugsley's political work for the Democratic Party; his philanthropic activities; his efforts to promote better understanding and knowledge of international affairs; his involvement in U.S. and New York politics (1910-1938); and U.S. economic conditions during the 1920s and 1930s, including information on banking. Correspondents include Roscoe Pound and William Howard Taft. Legal papers consist chiefly of typed copies of wills, affidavits, deeds, and trusts relating to Pugsley, the Westchester County National Bank, and various institutional recipients of Pugsley's philanthropy. There are numerous press releases and clippings from news bureaus concerning Pugsley's views on foreign and domestic affairs, his benefactions, institutes and conferences held, and the activities of the American Scenic and Historical Preservation Society. Printed material includes programs of college and university commencements and institutes; notices of stockholders'meetings; advertising circulars; notices of Harvard University class reunions; and papers dealing with national and New York politics in 1916. There are also resolutions relating to world organizations, the Westchester County National Bank, the Church Conference on Social Work, and the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia; and scattered minutes of the Peekskill Field Committee, Rollins College, and the League to Enforce Peace. Miscellaneous papers include speeches on domestic and foreign tdpics given by Pugsley.

Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal Papers, Miscellany, and Printed Material. For a more complete description see Davis and Miller, "Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University" (1980).

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Frank Allan Hanna papers, 1920-[ca. 1965] 7.5 Linear Feet — 2800 Items

Primarily professional papers documenting Hanna's research for the Social Science Research Committee, the American Statistical Association, the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, and other organizations; subjects include an analysis of census and manufacturing data, and the distribution of income and wealth. Other professional papers include general correspondence dated 1948 to 1956, and materials concerning Hanna's book, The Compilation of Manufacturing Statistics.

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Hammond family papers, 1751-1914, bulk 1820s-1890s 6 Linear Feet — Approx. 3507 Items

Residents of Frederick County, Maryland. Collection consists chiefly of business and legal papers of various members of the Hammond family of Maryland. The earliest items (1750s-1820s) are land grants and other land records of Nathan Hammond and Vachel Hammond. The papers of Thomas Hammond, who served as a judge of the Orphans' Court of Frederick Co., are mainly the records of his service as administrator of several estates or as guardian of orphans, but also include farm records, financial receipts, and slave purchases. The papers of Dawson V. Hammond, brother of Thomas, concern the administration of estates, including Thomas's holdings. There are a few references to Unionist sympathies in Maryland during the Civil War and economic conditions in the U.S. during the 1870s.

Collection consists chiefly of business and legal papers of various members of the Hammond family of Maryland. The earliest items (1750s-1820s) are land grants and other land records of Nathan Hammond and Vachel Hammond. The papers of Thomas Hammond, who served as a judge of the Orphans' Court of Frederick Co., are mainly the records of his service as administrator of several estates or as guardian of orphans, but also include farm records, financial receipts, and slave purchases. The papers of Dawson V. Hammond, brother of Thomas, concern the administration of estates, including Thomas's holdings. There are a few references to Unionist sympathies in Maryland during the Civil War and economic conditions in the U.S. during the 1870s. A later addition to the collection in the last two boxes consists of legal papers and financial volumes.

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John Jackson McSwain papers, 1910-1941 and undated 8.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 6600 Items

Lawyer, Army officer, and U.S. Representative from Greenville, South Carolina. Collection largely consists of letters from McSwain's constituents (1921-1936). Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); Prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain. Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes many speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring.

Collection largely consists of letters from John Jackson McSwain's constituents, dating from 1921 to 1936. Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain.

The correspondence starts with a few letters from 1910, when McSwain began to take tentative steps towards politics. There are letters relating to Dr. James Woodrow, Sept.2, 1910; and to Woodrow Wilson's campaigns for Governor of New Jersey in 1910 and for the presidency in 1912. There are patronage letters in 1912 and 1913, and a cloth portrait of Woodrow Wilson woven at Clemson College, South Carolina, in 1915.

Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring. The latest dates refer to condolences sent following McSwain's death of a heart attack in 1936, and his secretary Dixon Davis's political maneuverings with Joseph Raleigh Bryson following this event.

The digitized cardfiles provide a very detailed discussion of the collection's contents and topics. For access, please consult with a reference archivist.

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Lassiter Family papers, 1832-1928 29 Linear Feet — 21,752 Items

Daniel William Lassiter was a physician of Petersburg, Va. Collection comprises correspondence and other papers of Daniel William Lassiter, and of his sons, Francis Rives Lassiter, lawyer and U.S. Representative from Virginia, and Charles Trotter Lassiter, politician. Much of the correspondence concerns the political career of Francis R. Lassiter. Includes information on Confederate recruitment, politicians after the Civil War, Presidential elections, the Virginia militia, and economic conditions in the U.S. Correspondents include Henry Mills Alden, Thomas Baily Aldrich, John Hollis Bankhead, Harry Flood Byrd, Champ Clark, John Warwick Daniel, Henry De La War Flood, Carter Glass, Epps Hunton, Jr., Fitzhugh Lee, Arthur Lefevre, William Gordon McCabe, Thomas Staples Martin, John Garland Pollard, Furnifold McLendel Simmons, Charles Augustus Swanson, Henry St. George Tucker, Lyon Gardiner Tyler, and Edward Carrington Venable.

Collection comprises correspondence and other papers of Daniel William Lassiter, and of his sons, Francis Rives Lassiter, lawyer and U.S. Representative from Virginia, and Charles Trotter Lassiter, politician. Much of the correspondence concerns the political career of Francis R. Lassiter. Includes information on Confederate recruitment, politicians after the Civil War, Presidential elections, the Virginia militia, and economic conditions in the U.S. Correspondents include Henry Mills Alden, Thomas Baily Aldrich, John Hollis Bankhead, Harry Flood Byrd, Champ Clark, John Warwick Daniel, Henry De La War Flood, Carter Glass, Epps Hunton, Jr., Fitzhugh Lee, Arthur Lefevre, William Gordon McCabe, Thomas Staples Martin, John Garland Pollard, Furnifold McLendel Simmons, Charles Augustus Swanson, Henry St. George Tucker, Lyon Gardiner Tyler, and Edward Carrington Venable.

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Martin Bronfenbrenner papers, 1939-1995 and undated 16.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 12,000 Items

Economist on the faculty at Duke University. The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner's research and associations in the field of economics. Topics in his research files, which make up the bulk of the collection, include income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Printed Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material.

The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner's research and associations in the field of economics. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Published Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material. The Personal Papers Series includes an unpublished autobiography, a family history, and records of Bronfenbrenner's own U.S. loyalty hearings from 1954-1955. Files in the Teaching Material Series chiefly contain syllabi, course notes, and exams dating from Bronfenbrenner's time at Carnegie, Duke, and in Japan, while the Printed Material files mainly house reprints of many of his articles. The Research Files Series, divided into topical subseries, makes up the bulk of the collection, including Bronfenbrenner's research notes, articles, reprints, correspondence, lectures, and drafts of Bronfenbrenner's writings; the materials offer a rich source of unique research material on topics of interest to Bronfenbrenner such as income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The Research Files also contains a subseries of research folders linked to individual economists in whose work Bronfenbrenner had an interest, or with whom he corresponded, or both; names include Adelman, Baumol, Friedman, Leijonhufvud, Minsky, Samuelson, Spengler, Solow, and Viner, with two folders of material on Kei Shibata, who wrote on Marxian economics and economic equilibrium during the 1930s.

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Oskar Morgenstern papers, 1866-1992 and undated 41.8 Linear Feet — 27,691 Items

Economist, university professor, and author in Austria and U.S., born Carl Friedrich Alfred Oskar Morgenstern in Germany. The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian School of Economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian school of economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The first two decades of Morgenstern's career as an economist, the 1920s and 1930s, were associated with the University of Vienna where he was educated and was a faculty member until his emigration to the United States in 1938. He published major books about economic forecasting (1928) and the limits of economics (1934) and numerous other writings in which the subjects of business cycles, prices, the depression of the 1930s, economic conditions in Europe and America, currency and exchange, and economic history and theory are prominent. Information about them is scattered throughout the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Subject Files Series. Morgenstern's interests and correspondents were international, although principally European and American. A considerable part of the correspondence and writings during these years, and all of the diaries, are written in German. English is also prominent, and other languages also occur.

Morgenstern's output of publications during the 1940s, his first decade at Princeton University, was less extensive than in the 1930s, but he and John von Neumann published their classic Theory of Games and Economic Behavior in 1944. As Princeton editor Sanford G. Thatcher wrote in 1987, in sheer intellectual influence, it probably has stimulated more creative thinking, in a wider variety of fields of scholarship, than any other single book Princeton University Press has published. Information about this book and subsequent international developments in game theory pervades the Correspondence, Subject Files, and Writings and Speeches Series until Morgenstern's death. The elaboration of game theory was not only theoretical but also practical, and Morgenstern's writings and projects illustrate its applications, especially in U.S. military and foreign policy during the Cold War.

The Writings and Speeches Series, including the diaries, and the Subject Files Series are extensive for the 1940s as they are for the later decades of Morgenstern's career. The Correspondence Series, however, is extensive only for the 1920s, 1930s, and 1970s. Part of his correspondence apparently did not survive. However, Morgenstern routinely placed letters and other material in his files for subjects and writings, and many letters are to be found there. There are a number of letters for some correspondents, but extensive correspondence with an individual is not characteristic of this collection. A person's letters may be filed in more than one chronological group of correspondence.

Morgenstern published prolifically during the 1950s to 1970s. His major books focused on accuracy in economics (1950), organization (1951), national defense (1958), international finance and business cycles (1959), the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosions (1967), stock market prices (1970), political, economic, and military forecasting (1973), and expanding and contracting economies in various societies (1976). These books and numerous articles and reviews reveal his interest in economic theory, international economic problems, and the application of mathematics and economics to public policy problems. The Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Correspondence Series document many of his publications and such topics as the Cold War, nuclear issues, military and naval affairs (especially the U.S. Navy), defense, space, economic analysis, game theory, the stock market, business cycles, mathematics and economics, statistical validity, and his work with John von Neumann, Martin Shubik, Friedrich A. von Hayek, Gottfried Haberler, Antonio de Viti de Marco, Eveline Burns, Gerald L. Thompson, N. N. Vorob'ev, and others.

Morgenstern taught at Princeton until his retirement in 1970 when be began teaching at New York University, and both schools are represented, particularly in the Subject Files Series. These files and the Writings and Speeches Series document his relationship with public and private organizations, especially the Office of Naval Research, the Rand Corporation, various foundations and scholarly societies, and Mathematica, a consulting firm that did contract work for government and business. Morgenstern was co-founder of Mathematica. The Mathematica Series contains correspondence, memos, policy reports, project proposals, and research papers. The institutions that are often mentioned include NASA, Office of Naval Research, and Sandia Corporation. Topics, among others, relate to analysis of military conflicts, economics of the space program, management research, or peaceful use of nuclear energy. Some materials related to Mathematica Series are still scattered across the rest of the collection.

Morgenstern habitually incorporated into his files pertinent thoughts or information that might be useful for later consideration. Consequently, the Subject Files and Writings and Speeches Series often include letters, memoranda, lecture notes, writings by others, mathematics, printed material, and other Items. Thus, a file for a topic or publication in 1963 may contain relevant dated material from other years and decades.

The diaries, 1917-1977, are relatively complete, but Morgenstern did not write daily or every month. There are significant gaps: 1918-1920; Feb.-May 1938; March 1946-Jan. 1947; and Sept. 1951-Feb. 1952. Shorter gaps also occur in April-May 1924, Sept. 1925; June-July 1948; and April 1949. The diaries are in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Morgenstern's library of printed material was donated to New York University.

Addition (06-067) (2452 items, 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 1935-1976) contains primarily published works by Morgenstern and his major co-authors such as John von Neumann and Gerald L. Thompson in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and German arranged in alphabetical order. Important works contained in this series include typed manuscript portions of Theory of Games and Economic Behavior with annotations, draft chapters of the Question of National Defense, Long Term Planning with Models of Static and Dynamic Open Expanding Economies, the Mathematica Economic Analysis of the Space Shuttle System and some correspondence, as well as supporting documentation and statistics. There are also three audiotape reels with Morgenstern's lectures.

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Collection contains the records of the firm of Terrasson Brothers, established in Philadelphia by Antoine and Barthelemy Terrasson as a branch of their father's firm, John Terrasson and Company, headquartered in Paris and Lyons, France. Early business letters reflect the trade of the firm in grain, the furnishings of supplies to the French and American armies, and the purchase of tobacco at various places throughout the South. The letters contain information on the American Revolution, especially on naval operations, and on post-Revolutionary business conditions. Papers after 1800 concern the family of Mark Prager, members of which apparently married into the Terrasson family. Prager was owner of a trading firm in Holland. These papers contain information on Prager's trading activities until 1820, and on the family of Harriet Prager of Philadelphia. The later letters contain references to family affairs, slavery, politics and sectionalism. Approximately 100 Civil War letters describe conditions in the North.

Collection contains the records of the firm of Terrasson Brothers, established in Philadelphia by Antoine and Barthelemy Terrasson as a branch of their father's firm, John Terrasson and Company, headquartered in Paris and Lyons, France. Early business letters reflect the trade of the firm in grain, the furnishings of supplies to the French and American armies, and the purchase of tobacco at various places throughout the South. The letters contain information on the American Revolution, especially on naval operations, and on post-Revolutionary business conditions. Papers after 1800 concern the family of Mark Prager, members of which apparently married into the Terrasson family. Prager was owner of a trading firm in Holland. These papers contain information on Prager's trading activities until 1820, and on the family of Harriet Prager of Philadelphia. The later letters contain references to family affairs, slavery, politics and sectionalism. Approximately 100 Civil War letters describe conditions in the North.