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Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

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Non-profit organization founded in 1975, based in Washington, DC, whose chief focus is promoting changes in U.S. foreign and military policy in support of global human rights. The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); topics cover human rights issues, U.S. relations with Central and South America, demilitarization, nuclear weapons, the Cuban trade embargo, money laundering and other aspects of international finance, terrorism, and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files on other organizations; there are also many files of printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in documenting and reforming United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Specific topics covered by materials in the collection include U.S. relations with Central and South America, particularly with Colombia, El Salvador, Haiti, and Cuba; U.S. relations with South and East Asia, particularly the Korean Peninsula; demilitarization in areas of conflict; nuclear weapons and the arms race; the Cuban trade embargo; money laundering and other aspects of international finance; terrorism in various countries; and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records on other organizations which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files; there are also many files containing printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The CIP records are arranged in the following series: Development Files Series; Printed Materials Series; Oversize Materials Series; Robert White Papers Series; Adam Isacson Papers Series; Selig Harrison Papers Series; Wayne S. Smith Papers Series; Geographic, Subject, and Program Files Series; and Audiovisual Materials Series.

White's and Isacson's files retain their original arrangement into groups such as correspondence (some in digital form), research and subject files, speeches, and travel documentation. Harrison's files retain their original arrangment by region, such South and West Asia, East Asia and North Korea, while some materials have been removed to the Nuclear and Energy Subseries. The research files claim the largest proportion of the files for all individuals, and contain documentation on other organizations, individuals, and extensive information in particular on Central and South America and Asia. Other countries represented in the collection files to a lesser extent include Russia, Israel, Cuba and other countries surrounding the South and East Asia regions. Correspondence files are present throughout the collection, and include key individuals such as Iowa Senator Tom Harkin; Peter Dale Scott, former Canadian ambassador and political commentator; and Harrison Selig, Director of the Asia Program. Many other well-known politicians and activists are represented in smaller folders of materials; there are also a small number of administrative files related to internal staff members and board members. The development files reveal the nature of the CIP's fundraising activities, and the extent of support from charitable organizations; the most extensive files belong to the Ford Foundation, General Service Foundation, International Center for Development Policy, and the MacArthur Foundation; smaller files represent many other similar institutions.

Collection acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Collection consists of 115 Italian cultural and political posters, the bulk of which date from the 1970s and 1980s. Nearly half of the posters were printed by the Italian Communist Party (Pci) offices in Milan and Rome, chiefly in the 1970s, and address themes such as control of the media (particularly television and newspapers), the environment, elections, educational reform, political radicalism, labor issues, voting rights, patronage and other forms of corruption, and taxation. Many posters display the images and words of political activists from around the world. Some posters refer to Francoism, to American leaders such as President Nixon, and to the Vietnam War. Many of the latter express an anti-American position. Other posters in the collection advertise art and design exhibits, and announce celebrations and civic events. Also includes a set of 38 color slides of elections broadsides (1986-1987) posted in public spaces in Italy.

Collection consists of 115 Italian cultural and political posters, the bulk of which date from the 1970s and 1980s. Nearly half of the posters were printed by the Italian Communist Party (Pci) offices in Milan and Rome, chiefly in the 1970s, and address themes such as control of the media (particularly television and newspapers), the environment, elections, educational reform, labor issues, voting rights, patronage and other forms of corruption, and taxation. Some posters express opposition to Francoism, to American leaders such as President Nixon, and to American participation in the Vietnam War. Other individuals highlighted in the posters include political figures such as Lenin, and activists such as Angela Davis, Antonio Gramsci, George Jackson (Black Panther), Rosa Luxemburg, and Palmiro Togliatti. Among the many organizations referred are: NATO, the Pci (Communist Party), Pdc (Christian Democrats), and the Comitato Permanente Unitario Antifascista. One poster is a modern reproduction of a painting of an Italian political rally, circa 1901.

Although the majority of the posters carry a political message, others in the collection advertise art and design exhibits, referring to Italian artists ranging from Leonardo da Vinci to video artist Fabrizio Plessi; there are also a smaller number of posters advertising tourist locations and announcing celebrations and civic events held chiefly in Milan and Urbino but also other cities in Italy. Some posters are duplicates of others. Also includes a set of 38 color slides of elections broadsides (1986-1987) posted in public spaces in Italy.

The posters have been digitized and are available online on the Duke Libraries Digital Collections website. Online English translations provided by Paula Jeannet Mangiafico.

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Jack Faust Matlock was US Ambassador to the Soviet Union from 1987-1991. This collection includes materials from him and his wife, photographer Rebecca Matlock, dating largely from the 1940s through the mid-2010s. The bulk of items relates to their work for the US Foreign Service; they were officially stationed in Washington, Moscow, Prague, Accra, Dar es Salaam, and Zanzibar and traveled extensively throughout the world. Jack Matlock was a key figure in the Ronald Reagan administration and participated in almost every US-USSR summit from the 1970s until his retirement in 1991. Also present in the collection are diaries, writings, memoranda, reports, clippings, interviews, photographs, event files, audiovisual materials, and other documents regarding the Matlocks' career, travels, interests, family life, and scholarship.

This collection contains diaries, calendars, interviews, recordings, photographs, memoranda, clippings, writings, memorabilia, and other documents spanning the lives of Jack F. Matlock and Rebecca B. Matlock. The Matlocks spent 35 years in the US Foreign Service, with posts in Washington, Accra, Vienna, Germany, Zanzibar, Dar es Salaam, Moscow, and Prague. Their collection documents their government work as well as their family life, travels, and interactions with US and Soviet officials and citizens.

Materials have been sorted into series: Diaries, Foreign Service, Consecutive Files, Writings, Academia, Events, Subjects/Organizations/Names, and Personal Files. Each series is detailed below.