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E.D. Scott Account Books, 1847-1868 0.6 Linear Feet — 2 Items

Merchant and wholesaler. Originally from Philadelphia, Pa. Two account books, one containing an inventory of merchandise Scott sold at wholesale prices in Washington, D.C. to Union Army sutlers in 1863 as well as a separate index. It lists the sutlers and sometimes the regiments to whom he sold supplies. The other account book, chiefly 1866-1868, details the sales and the stock on hand in the dry goods store Scott operated in Minneapolis, Minn.

Two account books, one containing an inventory of merchandise Scott sold at wholesale prices in Washington, D.C. to Union Army sutlers in 1863 as well as a separate index. It lists the sutlers and sometimes the regiments to whom he sold supplies. The other account book, chiefly 1866-1868, details the sales and the stock on hand in the dry goods store Scott operated in Minneapolis, Minn.

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Captain George A. Flagg was the assistant quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac and was stationed at Harper's Ferry, West Virginia. The collection contains letters, reports, military telegrams, and papers pertaining to supplies and logistics in Maryland and West Virginia.

The collection contains letters, reports, military telegrams, and papers pertaining to supplies and logistics in Maryland and West Virginia. Letters and telegrams include requisitions for supplies, recommendations, requests from civilians for payment or inquiries for the sale of goods, and letters concerning remuneration for property damage. There are also circulars dealing with quartermaster regulations, daily record sheets of supplies, account sheets of Flagg's activities, receipt rolls of hired men, and reports on the means of transportation and animals at Harpers Ferry.

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Chiefly family correspondence, including that of Miss Mitchell, of Flushing, N.Y., and Shepherdstown, W. Va., relating to her relief work in Europe during and after World War I. Topics include U. S. Army camps, British Expeditionary Forces hospitals and nurses in France, refugees in Italy, various organizations for wounded soldiers, such as Le Phare de France, and the role women played in relief work. Some letters after World War I relate to continued European relief work and the Food for France Fund. Other correspondence includes that of John Fulton Berrien Mitchell, Sr., an officer in the 2nd New York Volunteer Cavalry, 1862-1864, concerning ordnance and camp and garrison equipage.

Chiefly family letters; genealogical material; Civil War papers of John Fulton Berrien Mitchell, Sr., an officer in the 2nd New York Volunteer Cavalry, 1862-1864, concerning ordnance and camp and garrison equipage; and letters concerning European travel in the 1870s; life in Columbia University during the early 1900s; life in France, Italy, and England and the United States during World War I; British Expeditionary Forces hospitals and nurses; treatment of wounded soldiers, especially the work among the blind of an organization called Le Phare de France; war work by women; postwar relief work; the Food for France Fund; life in Paris during the 1920s; and Sufism.

Correspondents include John Fulton Perrien, Jr.; Henry Bedinger; Edward Bedinger Mitchell; Nina Cornelia (Mitchell) Wickham (the aunt of Nina Cornelia Mitchell); Gladys Elliott; Winifred Holt; and John Fulton Berrien Mitchell, Jr.

There are also a few miscellaneous legal and financial papers and miscellaneous invitations, calling cards, school exercises by John Berrien Mitchell, Sr., at Columbia College, 1860-1861; report cards, 1890s, for Stephen H. Dandridge at Shepherd College; solicitations from charities clippings; and diaries and miscellaneous writings by various family members, especially by Nina Cornelia Mitchell about her experiences, particularly in Europe. One diary, 1860, by Sarah P. (Berrien) Mitchell describes a trip to Lake Superior and the mines which she saw there. There are also photographs of family members and of their homes.

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Robert Smith Rodgers papers, 1827-1897 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,389 Items

Colonel, 2nd Maryland Eastern Shore Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army. Chiefly Civil War papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. After 1863 there are references to African American contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864. Also included in the collection are papers relating to the Rodgers family of Maryland, including Rodgers's son Robert Slidell Rodgers, practicing law in Missouri following the Civil War.

Chiefly Civil War military papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. There are references after 1863 to treatment of and problems with contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account written by Rodgers of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864.

Scattered papers relate to other members of the Rodgers family, and include personal correspondence, letters relating to naval matters, estate papers, bills and receipts, and legal papers concerning land deeds and the manumission of a slave by Rodger's mother Minerva in the 1850s. There is an inventory of the property of Jerusha Denison at "Sion Hill" in 1856. Also included are materials for the study of navigation and a navigational logbook.

For many more details on the papers and the volumes in the collection, please ask a reference archivist to consult the main card file.

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Stonewall Jackson papers, 1855-1906 6.2 Linear Feet — 4723 Items

Confederate Army officer, from Lexington (Rockbridge Co.), Va. Collection includes correspondence, commissary papers, vouchers of Jackson's command, soldiers' leave requests, and other papers (chiefly 1861-1865). The commissary records, kept by Turner Ashby and J. H. Halsey, contain information about food in the Confederate Army. Other topics include military operations around Staunton, Va. (circa 1862), enemy movements around Harper's Ferry, a request that Jefferson County soldiers be allowed to march to Shepherdstown to vote, religious denominations opposed to war, captured property, and appointments of men to office. Correspondents and persons mentioned include James Walkinshaw Allen, P. G. T. Beauregard, Armistead Burwell, S. Bassett French, Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, Mrs. Robert T. Meade, and Clementine Neal.

Collection includes personal and military papers and records of "Stonewall" Jackson (1824-1863), general in the Confederate Army. Jackson's official and personal correspondence includes requests for furloughs; vouchers; descriptions of military movements around Staunton, Virginia, in 1862; the payroll of Turner Ashby's cavalry company raised following John Brown's raid, 1859; a letter, 1855, to Jackson's aunt, Clementine Neal; two letters by Jackson's wife; a letter, 1861, from Jackson to Colonel James Walkinshaw Allen, requesting permission to allow the Jefferson County soldiers to march to Shepherdstown to vote; a letter to General P. G. T. Beauregard concerning captured property; a letter, 1862, to S. Bassett French pertaining to religious denominations opposed to war; references to enemy movements around Harpers Ferry; and appointments of men to office. Official records include the commissary records of Wells J. Hawks (1814-1873), major and chief commissary of subsistence to Generals Jackson, Ewell, and Early, and of William B. Warwick, major and commissary for General Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Division; the commissary records of John J. Halsey, captain and commissary of subsistence of the 6th Virginia Cavalry; and the quartermaster records of William Miller, captain and assistant quartermaster of the 7th Virginia Cavalry.