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Alonzo Reed letters, 1864-1866 0.1 Linear Feet — 21 items — 21 items

Union soldier in the 102nd Regiment Infantry, U.S. Colored Troops. Collection consists of 21 personal letters of Alonzo Reed written while stationed in South Carolina during the latter part of the Civil War. Reed seems to have written some of the letters himself, while others were written for him by friends; all are addressed to his mother. He seems to have been in a camp in Detroit, Michigan, then was stationed in Hilton Head, S.C. in the summer of 1864; he remained there until 1865, when he was sent to Charleston, S.C., and then to Savannah, Georgia, and back to eastern S.C. for the duration. The letters indicate that Reed's regiment was often on picket duty, but also provide some descriptions of warfare and the ransacking of plantations. Reed, who was nearly illiterate, provides brief insights into daily camp life in terms of references of illnesses, hunger, not being paid for many months, and life as a soldier in the midst of war. Reed occasionally refers to the reception they received from both whites and blacks in the South. He also writes about fixing railroad supply lines and utilizing surrendered Confederate soldiers to aid in this work. In November 1864, he inquires as to whether African American men are being allowed to vote in the North and indicates that they are in the South. Arranged in chronological order.

Collection consists entirely of 21 personal letters from an African American Union soldier, Alonzo Reed, written to his mother while stationed in South Carolina during the latter part of the Civil War. Some of the letters were written by Reed, some by other individuals, and indicate that Reed's regiment was often on picket duty, though they also provide some descriptions of warfare and the ransacking of plantations during marches. A brief sketch of the letters is also included in the collection folder.

Reed, who was nearly illiterate, provides brief insights into daily camp life in terms of references of illnesses, hunger, not being paid for many months, life as a soldier in the midst of war, and the desire to have news, photos, and writing supplies from home. Reed occasionally refers to the reception they received from both whites and blacks in the South. He also writes about fixing railroad supply lines and utilizing surrendered Confederate soldiers to aid in this work. In November 1864, he inquires as to whether African American men are being allowed to vote in the North and indicates that they are in the South. Arranged in chronological order.

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Robert Smith Rodgers papers, 1827-1897 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,389 Items

Colonel, 2nd Maryland Eastern Shore Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army. Chiefly Civil War papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. After 1863 there are references to African American contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864. Also included in the collection are papers relating to the Rodgers family of Maryland, including Rodgers's son Robert Slidell Rodgers, practicing law in Missouri following the Civil War.

Chiefly Civil War military papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. There are references after 1863 to treatment of and problems with contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account written by Rodgers of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864.

Scattered papers relate to other members of the Rodgers family, and include personal correspondence, letters relating to naval matters, estate papers, bills and receipts, and legal papers concerning land deeds and the manumission of a slave by Rodger's mother Minerva in the 1850s. There is an inventory of the property of Jerusha Denison at "Sion Hill" in 1856. Also included are materials for the study of navigation and a navigational logbook.

For many more details on the papers and the volumes in the collection, please ask a reference archivist to consult the main card file.