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Baldy Ashburn Capehart papers, 1782-1902 1 Linear Foot — 369 Items

Collection contains deeds, plats, account books, regimental papers of North Carolina troops in the Civil War, and a scrapbook of letters and clippings regarding Capehart's death on January 5, 1899.

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Frederic B.M. Hollyday papers, 1818-1982, bulk 1860s-1946 2 Linear Feet — Approx. 298 Items

Frederic Hollyday was a professor of German history in the Department of History at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists chiefly of letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War; letters and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, with enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic; and papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, including family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938. In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke; genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogical information, a diary in typescript, and legal papers, of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

Collection consists chiefly of three main groups of papers. The first comprises letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War. The second contains correspondence and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, contain enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic. The third group comprises the papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, and includes family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938.

In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke as well as an agenda for the meetings of the Academic Council on the same issue. Correspondents include: Edwin H. Cady; Jay Luvaas, Professor of History at Allegheny College and Ph.D. graduate at Duke; Roger Marshall, Special Assistant to President Sanford; Terry Sanford, President of Duke University; and Richard L. Watson, Jr., Acting Chairman of the History Department.

Other papers in the collection include genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogy, diary in typescript, legal papers and other documents of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

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George Winfield was a resident of New Market, Virginia. Collection includes two volumes--an account book and a notebook containing writings, memoranda, accounts, and time tracking for farmhands. The notebook also contains a two-page description of the "Shenandoah Bridge Affair", which involved Ashby's cavalry (Confederate) and Chew's battery (Confederate).

Collection includes two volumes--an account book and a notebook containing writings, memoranda, accounts, and time tracking for farmhands. The notebook also contains a two-page description of the "Shenandoah Bridge Affair", which involved Ashby's cavalry (Confederate) and Chew's battery (Confederate).

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John Mead Gould papers, 1841-1944 8.8 Linear Feet — 3,617 Items

John Mead Gould was a Union Army officer and bank teller, of Portland, Maine. Correspondence, diaries, official papers, clippings and other printed materials, and other papers relating to Gould's service with the 1st Maine Infantry Regiment and its successors, the 10th and 29th Maine regiments, during the Civil War. Gould served as the regiments' official historian and was extensively involved in post-war reunions and veterans' claims. Subjects include Civil War campaigns and wartime and Reconstruction conditions in South Carolina, and the career of zoologist Edward Sylvester Morse. Also includes the diaries of Amelia Jenkins Twitchell Gould, 1860-1865, who taught a freedmen's school in Beaufort, S.C., and diaries written by Samuel McClellan Gould, a Presbyterian minister, 1841-1845, 1890-1895. Other materials include photocopies of letters, 1906-1926, from veterans of Gould's Civil War regiment, mostly giving news about the deaths of former members, and a photocopy of an autobiographical and genealogical narrative by Gould and two photographs.

This rich collection contains correspondence, diaries, official military papers, clippings and other printed materials, drafts of writings, photographs, and other papers documenting John Mead Gould's experiences in the Civil War, his activities in veterans' organizations, and his work as historian of the lst, l0th, and 29th Maine Regiments.

The correspondence in the collection relates in part to Gould's service in the 1st Maine Regiment and its successors, the 10th Maine Regiment and the 29th Maine Regiment and contains descriptions of the situation in Washington, D.C., 1861; guard duty on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Relay, Maryland, 1861-1862; the battle of Winchester, 1862; the battle of Cedar Mountain, 1862; two fragments from field notes on the Maryland campaign and the battle of Antietam, 1862; the Red River expedition, 1864; operations in the Shenandoah Valley, 1864; and occupation duty in Darlington, South Carolina, 1865.

There is family correspondence, especially for 1864; correspondence relating to Gould's attempt to establish a lumber business in South Carolina, 1866-1867; correspondence with other veterans after the war concerning Gould's history of the three regiments, validating pension claims, and veterans' organizations; correspondence of Adelthia Twitchell and Amelia Jenkins Twitchell, who went from Maine to teach freedmen in Beaufort, South Carolina, 1864-1865; and letters relating to the early career of the zoologist, Edward Sylvester Morse, a close friend of Gould's.

Legal papers in the collection include commissions, discharges, furloughs, pensions, and papers from the superior provost court, Darlington, South Carolina, 1865-1866. Rolls and reports of the lst-l0th-29th Maine Regiment, 1861-1869, form the official papers of those units and concern supplies, finances, furloughs and other service records. The records of 65 consecutive reunions of the lst-l0th-29th Regiment veterans, 1869-1933, include lists of personnel, minutes, and obituaries.

The letters written by Gould during the war, which he called his "journal," were bound into several volumes by his family. Although these are not with his papers, a long series of memorandum diaries by Gould remains in the collection. These little volumes begin in 1854 at Bethel Academy and continue until 1874, when Adelthia (Twitchell) Thompson and William E. Harward died. Along with Gould's Civil War diaries there is the diary of a Levi Johnson, Company B, 29th Maine Regiment, in South Carolina, 1865. The collection also contains the diaries of Gould's wife, Amelia Jenkins (Twitchell) Gould, 1860, 1862-1863, 1864-1865; diaries written by Samuel McClellan Gould, a Presbyterian minister (Gould's uncle), 1841-1845, 1890-1895; and diaries written about excursions to Antietam, Cedar Mountain, and other battlefields of the Civil War, 1884-1912.

Printed materials include clippings, broadsides, and pamphlets, many from the Civil War era. Accounts of Civil War prisons appear in the clippings as reminiscences. Casualties are reported in clippings directly after the Civil War battles in which the regiment fought. Broadsides contain poetry, veteran materials, and political brochures. The pamphlets pertain to veterans' activities.

There is a substantial series of photographs of the men of the lst-10th-29th Maine Regiment in the war and at various reunions. Materials added to the collection in 1988 include photocopies of letters, 1906-1926, from veterans of Gould's Civil War regiment, mostly giving news about the deaths of former members, and a photocopy of an autobiographical and genealogical narrative by Gould and two photographs.

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Confederate officer and businessman, of Martinsburg, W. Va. Correspondence, accounts, receipts, statements, muster rolls, orders, genealogical notes, and other personal, business, and military papers, of Nadenbousch and of his family. The bulk of the collection consists of business papers, mostly relating to Nadenbousch's flour mill and distillery. Includes material concerning the Berkeley Border Guards (later Co. D., 2d Regt., Virginia Infantry) and the Stonewall Brigade; public affairs in Martinsburg, W. Va.; the Berkeley Co. Agricultural and Mechanical Association; and activities of the West Virginia legislature.

Papers of John Quincy Adams Nadenbousch, his son-in-law, Alexander Parks, Jr., and other members of his family. The collection contains material relating to the operation of flour mills by John Q. A. Nadenbousch before the Civil War; the constitution of the Berkeley Border Guards formed in Berkeley County, Virginia, in 1859, and items relating to the subsequent service of that unit in the Civil War as a company of the 2nd Virginia Regiment, including letters of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson to his officers, commissary accounts, muster rolls, provost marshal records, and a manuscript draft of a report by John Q. A. Nadenbousch as colonel of the 2nd Virginia Regiment describing the experiences of that regiment in the fight at Culp's Hill, July 2, 1863, during the battle of Gettysburg; correspondence of John Q. A. Nadenbousch as agent of the Hannis Distilling Company of Baltimore, Maryland, engaged in the operation of a distillery at Martinsburg, West Virginia; letters relating to the management of the Grand Central Hotel in Martinsburg, 1878; and letters concerning John Q. A. Nadenbousch's general financial condition after the Civil War. Papers of Alexander Parks, Jr., concern his position as local agent for Hannis Distilling Company in Martinsburg after 1874; his participation in civic affairs in Martinsburg; and his work in the Democratic Party, including his election to the state senate of West Virginia in 1890. Papers of John Nadenbousch Parks, son of Alexander Parks, Jr., include letters to his family while he was a student at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia, 1893, and letters, 1917, to John N. Parks while he was a member of the legislature of West Virginia. Letters, 1895, of Elise Parks, daughter of Alexander Parks, Jr., concern her life as a student at Virginia Female Institute, Staunton, Virginia. Volumes in the collection include a treasurer's notebook, 1852, of a local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; a sheriff's account book, 1825-1841, from Jefferson County, West Virginia; an account of tax levies in Jefferson County; a ledger of John Q. A. Nadenbousch, 1872-1878; and notes and accounts of the Berkeley County Agricultural and Mechanical Association.

Correspondence includes a letter (1863) from U. S. senator Charles James Faulkner and two letters from Charlotte R. Pendleton of Berkeley Springs, Morgan Co., W. Va. One letter was written by her to Eldridge, her slave, expressing her concern for his well-being and her affection for him. The second is from Pendleton to Nadenbousch, begging him to send Eldridge home from the job for which he was conscripted in her absence.

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The diaries of William James Carlton span the years 1862 to 1877; the biography dates to about 1964. There are transcripts of the diaries and a draft manuscript of a biography, A Portrait of William James Carlton, 1838-1902, by Frankie McKee Robins. The transcripts are slightly annotated. For the years from 1862 to November 1864 the diaries chronicle William James Carlton's participation in the United States Civil War. From 1864 to 1877, the diaries primarily describe family events and church-related activities. A December 1873 entry indicates that no diaries were kept for the years 1865 to 1872. The bulk of the biography describes the years from 1861 to 1862.

The diaries begin during approximately the fifth month of William Carlton's enlistment in the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. His entries describe drills, recreation and holiday celebrations, sermons addressed to the troops, illness, and funerals. He briefly describes incidents and comradely associations among various regiments, including the 3rd Rhode Island [Heavy?] Artillery. Most of the descriptions of battles are from an observer's point of view but there are some sketchy descriptions of those in which he participated. Ships carrying troops, supplies, and mail are frequently named. During the period in which the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry was in the areas of Hilton Head and Daufuskie Island, South Carolina, and Fort Pulaski, Georgia, William Carlton visited the local area. He describes trips to Jones, Bird, and Tybee islands in Georgia. While on Daufuskie Island, the Stoddard plantation on Calibogue Sound was occupied by his regiment.

Entries from 1862 to 1864 reveal William Carlton's personal interests and activities. They include frequent discourse about specific books, magazines, and newspapers he read, with comments on authors and texts and comparisons of different titles. Correspondence between family and friends is regularly noted, including "sub rosas" to a brother. There are observations about African Americans, some of whom were escaped slaves, others were servants or in another sort of service to the Union, and a Black regiment, which Mr. Carlton refers to as the South Carolina Volunteers.

The diaries for 1873 to 1877 primarily discuss family activities and illness, the children's social development, and birthdays and holiday celebrations in Elizabeth, N.J., and nearby areas of New York. The Carltons were members of St. Paul's, probably a Methodist Episcopal church, in Elizabeth. Church-related activities were central in family life and included attendance at Sunday School and services. The diaries have notes about various preachers and the titles of sermons they gave. William Carlton was a trustee of the church. He was also on the board of the YMCA (probably the Young Men's Christian Association) and served as its Treasurer in 1873. His advertising business is mentioned only cursorily in the Diaries. In the entry for December 5, 1864, he wrote, "Commenced to canvas for advertisements this morning for several papers." Most other business-related entries merely note that he went to the office. In 1873 Mr. Carlton was the chair of the Committee on Credentials for the Advertising Agents Convention held at the Astor House. In 1877 he discussed the purchase of the Lady's Book with Mr. [Louis Antoine] Godey. There are a few mentions of Mr. Carlton's employee, "Thompson" [James Walter Thompson], including social occasions he shared with Mr. Carlton. James Walter Thompson bought the William J. Carlton agency from Mr. Carlton in 1878 and renamed it the J. Walter Thompson Company.

The biography briefly describes William James Carlton's early years, including his family and education. The bulk of the Biography describes William Carlton's military service and the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. The biography Appendix includes information from secondary sources, such as biographical sketches of members of the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry and other military officers; excerpts from reports and published sources about the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry; and other aspects of the Civil War. The biography Outline includes scattered, brief references to the William J. Carlton's advertising business but is predominantly descriptive of family life.

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Robert Smith Rodgers papers, 1827-1897 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,389 Items

Colonel, 2nd Maryland Eastern Shore Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army. Chiefly Civil War papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. After 1863 there are references to African American contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864. Also included in the collection are papers relating to the Rodgers family of Maryland, including Rodgers's son Robert Slidell Rodgers, practicing law in Missouri following the Civil War.

Chiefly Civil War military papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. There are references after 1863 to treatment of and problems with contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account written by Rodgers of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864.

Scattered papers relate to other members of the Rodgers family, and include personal correspondence, letters relating to naval matters, estate papers, bills and receipts, and legal papers concerning land deeds and the manumission of a slave by Rodger's mother Minerva in the 1850s. There is an inventory of the property of Jerusha Denison at "Sion Hill" in 1856. Also included are materials for the study of navigation and a navigational logbook.

For many more details on the papers and the volumes in the collection, please ask a reference archivist to consult the main card file.

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William Thomas Leavell papers, 1831-1932 5.6 Linear Feet — 17 boxes; 5,136 items

Collection contains the papers of W. T. Leavell and of his son-in-law, Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald, Confederate officer, attorney, and businessman. Leavell's papers contain correspondence with leaders of the Episcopal Church concerning church business, doctrinal disputes within the church, and debates between the Episcopal Church and other Protestant denominations; along with family letters and papers which provide information on the salaries, duties, and home life of a minister. The papers of Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald contain letters from Civil War veterans of McDonald's regiments, the 11th Virginia Cavalry and the 77th Virginia Militia, concerning battles and skirmishes in which they participated; a manuscript copy of McDonald's "The History of the Laurel Brigade," and letters, 1870-1890, pertaining to the Louisville Abstract and Loan Company and general business conditions in Louisville, Ky.

Collection comprises the papers of W. T. Leavell and of his son-in-law, Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald, Confederate officer, attorney, and businessman. Leavell's papers contain correspondence with leaders of the Episcopal Church concerning church business, doctrinal disputes within the church, and debates between the Episcopal Church and other Protestant denominations; and family letters and papers which provide information on the salaries, duties, and home life of a minister.

The papers also contain material pertaining to the economic and agricultural conditions in Leavell's parishes in Virginia and West Virginia and genealogical material on many of his parishioners; letters while a student at Bristol College, Bristol, Pa., 1833-1836, and at Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, 1836-37; letters from brothers and sisters in Spotsylvania and Culpeper counties, Va., discussing agriculture; correspondence between daughter Anne Leavell and John M. Daniel in the 1870s, both before and after their respective marriages; and over 200 sermons. Leavell was a teacher at Fairfax Institute, 1837-39. Box 9 contains a diary in which Leavell included much autobiographical information.

The papers of Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald contain letters from Civil War veterans of McDonald's regiments, the 11th Virginia Cavalry and the 77th Virginia Militia, concerning battles and skirmishes in which they participated; a manuscript copy of McDonald's "The History of the Laurel Brigade," and letters, 1870-1890, pertaining to the Louisville Abstract and Loan Company and general business conditions in Louisville, Ky.