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Non-profit organization founded in 1975, based in Washington, DC, whose chief focus is promoting changes in U.S. foreign and military policy in support of global human rights. The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); topics cover human rights issues, U.S. relations with Central and South America, demilitarization, nuclear weapons, the Cuban trade embargo, money laundering and other aspects of international finance, terrorism, and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files on other organizations; there are also many files of printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in documenting and reforming United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Specific topics covered by materials in the collection include U.S. relations with Central and South America, particularly with Colombia, El Salvador, Haiti, and Cuba; U.S. relations with South and East Asia, particularly the Korean Peninsula; demilitarization in areas of conflict; nuclear weapons and the arms race; the Cuban trade embargo; money laundering and other aspects of international finance; terrorism in various countries; and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records on other organizations which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files; there are also many files containing printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The CIP records are arranged in the following series: Development Files Series; Printed Materials Series; Oversize Materials Series; Robert White Papers Series; Adam Isacson Papers Series; Selig Harrison Papers Series; Wayne S. Smith Papers Series; Geographic, Subject, and Program Files Series; and Audiovisual Materials Series.

White's and Isacson's files retain their original arrangement into groups such as correspondence (some in digital form), research and subject files, speeches, and travel documentation. Harrison's files retain their original arrangment by region, such South and West Asia, East Asia and North Korea, while some materials have been removed to the Nuclear and Energy Subseries. The research files claim the largest proportion of the files for all individuals, and contain documentation on other organizations, individuals, and extensive information in particular on Central and South America and Asia. Other countries represented in the collection files to a lesser extent include Russia, Israel, Cuba and other countries surrounding the South and East Asia regions. Correspondence files are present throughout the collection, and include key individuals such as Iowa Senator Tom Harkin; Peter Dale Scott, former Canadian ambassador and political commentator; and Harrison Selig, Director of the Asia Program. Many other well-known politicians and activists are represented in smaller folders of materials; there are also a small number of administrative files related to internal staff members and board members. The development files reveal the nature of the CIP's fundraising activities, and the extent of support from charitable organizations; the most extensive files belong to the Ford Foundation, General Service Foundation, International Center for Development Policy, and the MacArthur Foundation; smaller files represent many other similar institutions.

Collection acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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James T. Williams papers, 1836-1947 48 Linear Feet — 36,000 Items

The Williams Papers span the period 1836 to 1947 with the bulk dating from 1904 to 1942. The collection contains the following series: Diaries and Reminiscences; Correspondence; Subject Files; Legal Papers; Financial Papers; Writings and Speeches; Miscellaneous; Clippings; Printed Material; and Pictures. Correspondence comprises the majority of the collection and particularly focuses on Williams's professional career during the period from 1910 to 1925 when he was editor of the Tucson Citizen and the Boston Evening Transcript. While the collection documents aspects of Williams's personal and professional life from his college days through the early 1940s, the last twenty years of his life are not included. There is as well very little information about the Teapot Dome Affair in the correspondence, which occurred during the period covered by the collection.

Williams wrote, spoke, and accumulated material about a variety of topics and concerns which are represented in different parts of the collection. Among the most prominent are Aviation and the Presidential Elections of 1916, 1920, and 1924 which are found in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Clippings, Printed Material and Pictures Series; Military preparedness before the entry of the United States into World War I in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, and Pictures Series; Arizona's efforts to achieve statehood in the Correspondence, Legal Papers, and Writings and Speeches Series; Massachusetts politics in the Diaries and Reminiscences, Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Clippings, and Printed Material Series; and Peace and disarmament in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Clippings and Printed Material Series. Prominent politicians such as Warren G. Harding and Herbert Hoover are represented in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Clippings Series. The collection would be of interest to researchers studying the League of Nations, the Republican Party during the first quarter of the 20th century, and the political and social climate in Greenville, S.C..

The Correspondence Series illustrates that as a leading spokesman for the Republican Party, Williams corresponded with many public figures concerning the topics above. After moving to Tucson, Williams became involved in Arizona's efforts to become a state. He represented the positions taken by President Taft and expressed these viewpoints in numerous editorials related to political matters. Many letters criticize Woodrow Wilson and Josephus Daniels for their policies relating to military preparedness and foreign relations. Of particular note are Williams's strong opposition to the League of Nations and his correspondence in the collection with leading opponents of the League, including Henry Cabot Lodge (1850-1924), William Edgar Borah, Hiram Warren Johnson, and Frank Bosworth Brandegee.

Also included in the Correspondence Series is extensive family correspondence containing material about the social life and political affairs in Greenville, S.C., where Williams's father was mayor, and about his mother's family, the McBees of Lincolnton, N.C. Numerous letters were written by his uncles, Silas McBee, a noted Episcopal clergyman and editor in New York; William Ephraim Mikell, Dean of the Law School at the University of Pennsylvania; and William Alexander Guerry, an Episcopal bishop in South Carolina. There are also letters from cousins, Mary Vardrine McBee, who founded Ashley Hall, a school for girls in Charleston, South Carolina, and Alexander Guerry, who served in various positions at the University of Chatanooga and at The University of the South. Other correspondents in the series include William Howard Taft, Leonard Wood, Nicholas Murray Butler, Albert J. Beveridge, Calvin Coolidge, Frank H. Hitchcock, Charles Nagel, Theodore Roosevelt, and John Wingate Weeks.

Related collections include the Vardry Alexander McBee Papers at Duke University, the Silas McBee and the McBee Family collections at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the James Thomas Williams (1845-1936) Papers at the University of South Carolina, and an interview with Williams in the Biographical Oral History Collection at Columbia University.

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Oskar Morgenstern papers, 1866-1992 and undated 41.8 Linear Feet — 27,691 Items

Economist, university professor, and author in Austria and U.S., born Carl Friedrich Alfred Oskar Morgenstern in Germany. The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian School of Economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian school of economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The first two decades of Morgenstern's career as an economist, the 1920s and 1930s, were associated with the University of Vienna where he was educated and was a faculty member until his emigration to the United States in 1938. He published major books about economic forecasting (1928) and the limits of economics (1934) and numerous other writings in which the subjects of business cycles, prices, the depression of the 1930s, economic conditions in Europe and America, currency and exchange, and economic history and theory are prominent. Information about them is scattered throughout the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Subject Files Series. Morgenstern's interests and correspondents were international, although principally European and American. A considerable part of the correspondence and writings during these years, and all of the diaries, are written in German. English is also prominent, and other languages also occur.

Morgenstern's output of publications during the 1940s, his first decade at Princeton University, was less extensive than in the 1930s, but he and John von Neumann published their classic Theory of Games and Economic Behavior in 1944. As Princeton editor Sanford G. Thatcher wrote in 1987, in sheer intellectual influence, it probably has stimulated more creative thinking, in a wider variety of fields of scholarship, than any other single book Princeton University Press has published. Information about this book and subsequent international developments in game theory pervades the Correspondence, Subject Files, and Writings and Speeches Series until Morgenstern's death. The elaboration of game theory was not only theoretical but also practical, and Morgenstern's writings and projects illustrate its applications, especially in U.S. military and foreign policy during the Cold War.

The Writings and Speeches Series, including the diaries, and the Subject Files Series are extensive for the 1940s as they are for the later decades of Morgenstern's career. The Correspondence Series, however, is extensive only for the 1920s, 1930s, and 1970s. Part of his correspondence apparently did not survive. However, Morgenstern routinely placed letters and other material in his files for subjects and writings, and many letters are to be found there. There are a number of letters for some correspondents, but extensive correspondence with an individual is not characteristic of this collection. A person's letters may be filed in more than one chronological group of correspondence.

Morgenstern published prolifically during the 1950s to 1970s. His major books focused on accuracy in economics (1950), organization (1951), national defense (1958), international finance and business cycles (1959), the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosions (1967), stock market prices (1970), political, economic, and military forecasting (1973), and expanding and contracting economies in various societies (1976). These books and numerous articles and reviews reveal his interest in economic theory, international economic problems, and the application of mathematics and economics to public policy problems. The Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Correspondence Series document many of his publications and such topics as the Cold War, nuclear issues, military and naval affairs (especially the U.S. Navy), defense, space, economic analysis, game theory, the stock market, business cycles, mathematics and economics, statistical validity, and his work with John von Neumann, Martin Shubik, Friedrich A. von Hayek, Gottfried Haberler, Antonio de Viti de Marco, Eveline Burns, Gerald L. Thompson, N. N. Vorob'ev, and others.

Morgenstern taught at Princeton until his retirement in 1970 when be began teaching at New York University, and both schools are represented, particularly in the Subject Files Series. These files and the Writings and Speeches Series document his relationship with public and private organizations, especially the Office of Naval Research, the Rand Corporation, various foundations and scholarly societies, and Mathematica, a consulting firm that did contract work for government and business. Morgenstern was co-founder of Mathematica. The Mathematica Series contains correspondence, memos, policy reports, project proposals, and research papers. The institutions that are often mentioned include NASA, Office of Naval Research, and Sandia Corporation. Topics, among others, relate to analysis of military conflicts, economics of the space program, management research, or peaceful use of nuclear energy. Some materials related to Mathematica Series are still scattered across the rest of the collection.

Morgenstern habitually incorporated into his files pertinent thoughts or information that might be useful for later consideration. Consequently, the Subject Files and Writings and Speeches Series often include letters, memoranda, lecture notes, writings by others, mathematics, printed material, and other Items. Thus, a file for a topic or publication in 1963 may contain relevant dated material from other years and decades.

The diaries, 1917-1977, are relatively complete, but Morgenstern did not write daily or every month. There are significant gaps: 1918-1920; Feb.-May 1938; March 1946-Jan. 1947; and Sept. 1951-Feb. 1952. Shorter gaps also occur in April-May 1924, Sept. 1925; June-July 1948; and April 1949. The diaries are in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Morgenstern's library of printed material was donated to New York University.

Addition (06-067) (2452 items, 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 1935-1976) contains primarily published works by Morgenstern and his major co-authors such as John von Neumann and Gerald L. Thompson in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and German arranged in alphabetical order. Important works contained in this series include typed manuscript portions of Theory of Games and Economic Behavior with annotations, draft chapters of the Question of National Defense, Long Term Planning with Models of Static and Dynamic Open Expanding Economies, the Mathematica Economic Analysis of the Space Shuttle System and some correspondence, as well as supporting documentation and statistics. There are also three audiotape reels with Morgenstern's lectures.

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Patricia Murphy Derian papers, 1962-2008 and undated 15.3 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,175 Items

Patricia Murphy Derian is an activist, organizer, researcher, and served as the first Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA), a bureau of the executive branch created in 1977 during the Carter Administration. The papers of Patricia M. Derian cover the years 1962-2007 and document Derian's involvement and interventions concerning international human rights, and to a lesser extent, civil liberties and women's rights. The collection comprises Derian's personal notes; correspondence with state officials, friends and human rights activists; unclassified State Department documents; reports; interviews; memorabilia; and news clippings. These and other materials provide valuable insights to the history of human rights activism and major cases of human rights violations from the early 1970s up to the second term of the George W. Bush administration. The scope of Derian's papers is extensive, covering the history of human rights movements and national policies and politics since the early 1970s in Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Topics include U.S. foreign and military policies, repercussions of those policies, and disappearances, torture and other forms of violation of human rights. Derian's papers include subject files on Argentina, El Salvador, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, South Korea, Vietnam, and Middle Eastern countries, as well as smaller files on sixteen other countries. Many of these country files cover several decades of information and analysis. Especially significant are documents concerning U.S.-El Salvador and U.S.-Argentina relations during the 1970s and 1980s. Other topics in the collection include women's rights, women in public office, and civil rights movements in the U.S., especially in Mississippi. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Patricia Murphy Derian papers cover the years 1962-2008 and document Derian's involvement and interventions concerning human rights and civil liberties in the U.S. and worldwide. Derian was an activist, organizer, researcher, and served as the first Assistant Secretary of State for Bureau for Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA), created in 1977 by President Jimmy Carter. The collection comprises Derian's personal notes; correspondence with state officials, friends and human rights activists; unclassified State Department documents; reports; travel information; posters (located in the Oversize Material); interviews (both audio-visual and printed); memorabilia; and news clippings. These and other materials provide valuable insights into the history of human rights activism and major cases of human rights violations from the early 1970s up to the second term of the George W. Bush administration. The collection is arranged into five series: Carter Administration - 1980 Campaign and Employment, Department of State Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA) Bureau, Post-Carter Administration Human Rights Work, Countries, and Audiovisual Material. A final group houses oversize material. The scope of Derian's papers is extensive, covering the history of human rights movements and national policies and politics since the early 1970s in Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. U.S. foreign and military policies, repercussions of those policies, and documentation of disappearances, torture and other forms of violation of human rights are documented extensively in the Department of State Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA) Bureau Series, and in the large Countries Series, which brings together Derian's files on Argentina, El Salvador, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, South Korea, Vietnam, and Middle Eastern countries, as well as a grouping on sixteen other countries. Many of these country files cover several decades of information and analysis. Especially significant are documents concerning U.S.-El Salvador and U.S.-Argentina relations during the 1970s and 1980s. Other topics in the collection include women's rights, women in public office, civil liberties in the U.S., and the human rights work of foundations such as the Carter-Menil Human Rights Foundation and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Foundation.

The Carter Administration - 1980 Carter-Mondale Campaign and Employment series includes materials concerning the organization of the 1980 Carter-Mondale election campaign; it also documents employment procedures for Derian's position at the White House.

The Post-Carter Administration Human Rights Work series is arranged into five subseries. The Human Rights Organizations subseries documents Derian's post-Carter administration human rights work in connection with various organizations, NGO's and research institutes. The Symposia and Conferences subseries comprises programs, proceedings, and papers presented at conferences and symposia attended by Derian. The General Files subseries contains subject files assembled by Derian that address broad human rights matters, including some materials on civil rights movement in Mississippi, human rights during the Reagan administration, and human rights violations around the world, including torture, murder, and kidnappings. The Prizes and Awards subseries covers the materials concerning Derian's work on committees of various foundations advocating the improvement of human rights conditions worldwide. The Miscellaneous Files subseries contains materials such as articles, dissertation monographs, reports, correspondence, political posters, and news clippings which refer to diverse issues such as humans rights and the Bush administration, the women's rights movement, U.S. foreign policy, and evaluation of the political and human rights situation in various Latin American countries.

Recordings of Patricia Derian's public speeches, interviews and excerpts from political protests in Argentina are housed in the Audiovisual Series. The Oversized Material grouping houses large items removed from files throughout the collection. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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The Washington Office on Latin America is an international human rights advocacy organization headquartered in Washington D.C. The Washington Office on Latin America Records span the dates 1962 to 2008 and consist of research and project files on nearly every country in Latin America, administrative records, clippings, correspondence, and printed material, all relating to the work of the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. WOLA partners with local organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to raise awareness of human rights abuses in the region and to influence the foreign policy agenda of the United States government. Materials in this collection provide a rich resource for the study of politically motivated violence and other human rights abuses throughout Latin America and also document the changing political climate towards the region in Washington D.C. over nearly four decades.

The Washington Office on Latin America Records span the dates 1962 to 2008 and consist of research and project files on nearly every country in Latin America, administrative files, clippings, correspondence, and printed material, all related to the work of the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. WOLA partners with local organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to raise awareness of human rights abuses in the region and to influence the foreign policy agenda of the United States government. Materials in this collection provide a rich resource for the study of politically motivated violence and other human rights abuses throughout Latin America, and document the changing political attitudes towards the region on the part of the U.S. government over nearly four decades. Numerous files of individual human rights abuse cases, including torture, forced disappearances, and executions can be found in this collection. In addition, WOLA's efforts to lobby for legislative change are chronicled throughout the collection. Material includes some ephemeral or hard-to-find printed material produced by leftist or guerilla groups in Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico, as well as some audiovisual recordings housed within country files.

The collection is arranged in the following series: Administrative Files, Geographic, Initiatives and Activities, Sound Recordings, and Oversize Material. The Administrative Files Series contains records kept by WOLA directors and staff, many funding-related files, some overviews of WOLA's activities, and other files of an administrative nature such as meeting minutes and planning, and staff retreats. The largest in the collection, the Geographic Series is divided into subseries for most countries in the region, documenting the major political and human rights issues associated with each country. These files typically include large sub-groupings on the following broad topics: human rights cases specific to that country; economic development; drug policy and related issues, especially in Colombia and Mexico; elections; police and military; U.S. policy; international relations; files related to WOLA visits to or activities in that country; and in some cases, files of printed materials assembled by WOLA staff. The human rights files cover such issues as labor rights, peasants' rights and land reforms, indigenous people's rights, politically motivated abuses, killings, and discrimination, civil rights cases of all kinds, reconciliation and truth commissions, and the activities of human rights organizations in each country and in the U.S. The Initiatives and Activities Series, divided into topical categories as arranged by WOLA staff, covers the organization's issue-based work in areas such as U.S. drug policy, trade and banking, democratic and peace processes, economic development, issues related to the deployment of military and police forces, and more. A large group of records documents the extensive legislative work performed by WOLA on behalf of human rights issues. There is considerable overlap between this series and the Geographic Series. The Sound Recordings Series contains recordings of conferences, speeches, and events sponsored by WOLA and other groups. Finally, the six boxes in the Oversize Material section at the end of this collection guide contain large items such as posters and newspapers separated from the main collection and rehoused for preservation purposes. Materials are chiefly in English and Spanish, with a smaller percentage in French and Portuguese. All of the series and each subseries are described in more detail in the description of the collection that follows. Unprocessed additions to the collection have been added at the end of the finding aid. Collection was acquired as part of the Duke University's Archive for Human Rights.