Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Place United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1900 Remove constraint Place: United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1900

Search Results

collection icon
American educator, born a slave in Franklin County, Virginia. Founder and president of Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. Collection comprises correspondence and related material concerning the Carnegie Hall conference (January 6-8, 1904) and the subsequent formation of the Committee of Twelve for the Advancement of the Negro Race by Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois. The letters in the collection document the Committee of Twelve's work, contain commentary on the status of African Americans, and detail Washington's relationships with many of the key African American leaders of his day. The most striking is Washington's correspondence with W.E.B. Du Bois, where the tension and ideological conflict between the two men is clearly demonstrated. Other prominent correspondents include Charles W. Chestnutt, John S. Durham, Thomas Fortune, Marcus Garvey, Archibald Grimké; Francis J. Grimké, James Weldon Johnson, Judson W. Lyons, Fredrick L. McGhee, Whitefield McKinlay, Kelly Miller, Robert R. Moton, Charles W. Russell, Emmett J. Scott, and Alexander Walters. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection comprises over 90 pieces of correspondence and related materials concerning the Carnegie Hall Conference (January 6-8, 1904) and the subsequent formation of the Committee of Twelve for the Advancement of the Interest of the Negro Race. The conference was a critical event in the early history of the African American civil rights movement. It was organized by Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois, and it brought together many of the most prominent African American leaders in the United States. The Committee broke up in 1905 due to differences between the leaders.

The letters in the collection provide documentary evidence for the Committee of Twelve's evolution and work, as well as commentary on the status of African Americans. They detail Washington's relationships with many of the key African American leaders of his day. The most striking is Washington's correspondence with W.E.B. Du Bois, where the tension and ideological conflict between the two men is clearly demonstrated. Other prominent correspondents include Charles W. Chestnutt, John S. Durham, Thomas Fortune, Marcus Garvey, Archibald Grimké; Francis J. Grimké, James Weldon Johnson, Judson W. Lyons, Fredrick L. McGhee, Whitefield McKinlay, Kelly Miller, Robert R. Moton, Charles W. Russell, Emmett J. Scott, and Alexander Walters.

Other materials in the collection include copies of the pamphlet "Why disfranchisement is bad" (July 1904); a photocopy of and a copy of the original article, "The estimate of an eminent Virginian of the merit of the book THE WHITE MAN'S BURDEN"; and a poem, "The Empty Sleeve".

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

collection icon

Eugenius Aristides Nisbet papers, 1804-1934 25 Linear Feet — 15,909 Items

Lawyer, U. S. Representative and Confederate representative, of Macon, Ga. Correspondence, legal notebooks, bankbooks, family albums, genealogical charts, memorabilia, and other items, of Nisbet and of his family. The bulk of the collection consists of largely routine legal correspondence of Nisbet, of his son, James Taylor Nisbet, lawyer and editor, and of his brother, James Alexander Nisbet. Other papers relate to social life and customs in 19th century Georgia, political events after the Civil War, soldiers' views of the Spanish-American War, the education of girls in the early 20th century, and Nisbet family genealogy. Includes personal correspondence of Junius Wingfield Nisbet and a diary (1873-1879) of John W. Nisbet. Correspondents include Charles L. Bartlett, H. B. Battle, William Horn Battle, Allen D. Candler, W. C. Dawson, Charles H. Herty, Walter B. Hill, Malcolm Johnston, Alexander R. Lawton, John M. Kell, Wilson Lumpkin, Howard E. Rondthaler, William Schley, Hoke Smith, and James M. Smith. Also includes a transcription of a land conveyance allowing the state of Georgia to purchase 1134 acres of land from Major-General Anthony Wayne.

Correspondence, legal notebooks, bankbooks, family albums, genealogical charts, memorabilia, and other items, of Nisbet and of his family. The bulk of the collection consists of largely routine legal correspondence of Nisbet, of his son, James Taylor Nisbet, lawyer and editor, and of his brother, James Alexander Nisbet. Other papers relate to social life and customs in 19th century Georgia, political events after the Civil War, soldiers' views of the Spanish-American War, the education of girls in the early 20th century, and Nisbet family genealogy. Includes personal correspondence of Junius Wingfield Nisbet and a diary (1873-1879) of John W. Nisbet. Correspondents include Charles L. Bartlett, H. B. Battle, William Horn Battle, Allen D. Candler, W. C. Dawson, Charles H. Herty, Walter B. Hill, Malcolm Johnston, Alexander R. Lawton, John M. Kell, Wilson Lumpkin, Howard E. Rondthaler, William Schley, Hoke Smith, and James M. Smith. Also includes a transcription of a land conveyance allowing the state of Georgia to purchase 1134 acres of land from Major-General Anthony Wayne.

collection icon

John R. Pendell papers, 1817-1906 2 Linear Feet — 1527 Items

John R. Pendell was a teacher, Baptist minister, and book salesman of Worcester, Mass. and New York. Collection consists of personal correspondence of several generations of the family of John R. Pendell, teacher, salesman, and Baptist minister, and of the related F. D. Ingersoll and Jeduthan Stevens families, discussing family finances, social life and customs in Massachusetts and New York, the need for education for various members of the family, religion, temperance and prohibition, and the presidential elections of 1884 and 1888.

Collection consists of personal correspondence of several generations of the family of John R. Pendell, teacher, salesman, and Baptist minister, and of the related F. D. Ingersoll and Jeduthan Stevens families, discussing family finances, social life and customs in Massachusetts and New York, the need for education for various members of the family, religion, temperance and prohibition, and the presidential elections of 1884 and 1888.