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Edwin Clarke Gregory papers, 1877-1948 and undated 2.8 Linear Feet — 3,699 Items

Lawyer and North Carolina legislator, from Salisbury (Rowan Co.), North Carolina. Papers, primarily legal, business, and political correspondence, of Gregory and of his father-in-law, Lee Slater Overman, lawyer and U.S. Senator from North Carolina. Gregory's papers give much information on his career in the North Carolina Senate and relate to such topics as agriculture, gold mining, public aid, and public libraries. A majority of the papers before 1930 pertain to Overman's service in the U.S. Senate (1903-1930) and refer to such events as the North Carolina senatorial contest of 1902, the Espionage Acts of 1914 and 1915, and Alfred E. Smith's 1928 presidential campaign in North Carolina. Includes letters of Margaret Overman Gregory relating to her activities in charitable foundations and the American Red Cross about the time of World War I. Correspondents include Josiah W. Bailey, Josephus Daniels, Frank P. Graham, and Sam Rayburn.

Papers, primarily legal, business, and political correspondence, of Gregory and of his father-in-law, Lee Slater Overman, lawyer and U.S. Senator from North Carolina. Gregory's papers give much information on his career in the North Carolina Senate and relate to such topics as agriculture, gold mining, public aid, and public libraries. A majority of the papers before 1930 pertain to Overman's service in the U.S. Senate (1903-1930) and refer to such events as the North Carolina senatorial contest of 1902, the Espionage Acts of 1914 and 1915, and Alfred E. Smith's 1928 presidential campaign in North Carolina. Includes letters of Margaret Overman Gregory relating to her activities in charitable foundations and the American Red Cross about the time of World War I. Correspondents include Josiah W. Bailey, Josephus Daniels, Frank P. Graham, and Sam Rayburn.

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Collection contains three volumes relating to the life and political career of George Meade Bowers, Congressional member for West Virginia, 1916-1923: a scrapbook (1898-1914) of clippings and a few other items concerning the United States Fish Commission, fish culture, the fishing industry, and politics and elections in West Virginia, with a few items relating to the Bowers family; a scrapbook of congratulatory telegrams sent after Bowers's 1916 election to Congress; and a photograph album from a 1917 visit to Hawaii by a congressional delegation, which included Bowers, containing gelatin silver photographs with views from the islands of Hawaii, Oahu, and Kauai, photographs of officials and Japanese and Hawaiian inhabitants, and an image of Queen Liliuokalani lying in state following her death November 11, 1917.

Collection contains three volumes belonging to George Meade Bowers, Republican politician and government official from West Virginia.

The photograph album, entitled "Photographs, Congressional Party in Hawaii, George Meade Bowers," contains 58 silver gelatin photographs. The album is undated, but the image content establishes its creation from 1916-1917. The delegation's visit in 1917 coincided with the death of Queen Liliuokalani on Nov. 11, 1917 and her funeral; the album includes a photograph of the Queen lying in state. Settings include the islands of Oahu, Hawaii, and Kauai, including Honolulu, Kona, Waimea, Kaimu, Makapuu, and Hilo. Scenes include Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (created a national park in 1916), the delegation, schoolchildren, Japanese, Hawaiians, public officials, and travel.

The scrapbook, also assembled by George Bowers, contains mostly clippings but also a small number of photographs, and dates from 1898-1914. They primarily concern his work as U.S. Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries, 1898-1913. There are a variety of clippings about Bowers, the Fish Commission, the International Fisheries Congress in 1908, oyster; lobsters, various kinds of fish, and the U.S. fishing industry. There are also numerous clipping about politics and elections in West Virginia. A few clippings concern the Bowers family.

The third album contains congratulatory telegrams for Bowers' 1916 election to Congress from the Second District of West Virginia. The telegrams include two from Theodore Roosevelt, one of which is substantive. There is one photograph in the back of the leather volume, of a campaign parade for Bowers.

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George Tinkham papers, 1909-1952 10.4 Linear Feet — 631 Items

U.S. representative from Mass. Chiefly clippings and press releases relating to the life of George Holden Tinkham, a lawyer, Republican senator, and big game hunter from Boston, Mass. Tinkham's political career is well represented by the clippings and press releases (1919-1942), which show his position on foreign and domestic affairs, and detail his opposition to the prohibitionists.

Chiefly clippings and press releases relating to the life of George Holden Tinkham, a lawyer, Republican senator, and big game hunter from Boston, Mass. Tinkham's political career is well represented by the clippings and press releases (1919-1942), which show his position on foreign and domestic affairs, and detail his opposition to the prohibitionists.

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Harry A. Slattery papers, 1890-1953 60 Linear Feet — circa 35,300

The Harry Slattery Papers span the period 1890-1953 with the bulk dated 1928 to 1944. They include correspondence, memoranda, writings and speeches, printed material, clippings, scrapbooks, and indexes. The collection chiefly concerns positions Slattery held during his years of public service and reflect his lifelong interest in conservation. Very few of Slattery's personal papers are included in the collection.

The bulk of the collection relates to Slattery's positions as personal assistant to Harold L. Ickes (1933-1938), as Under-secretary of the Interior (1938-1939), and as administrator of the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) (1939-1944). Other papers concern his service as secretary to Gifford Pinchot (1909-1912), as secretary of the National Conservation Association (1912-1923), as special assistant to Interior Secretary Franklin K. Lane (1917-1918), as a Washington lawyer (1923-1933), and as counsel to the National Boulder Dam Association (1925-1929). There is also information about the Teapot Dome Scandal. While information about the REA is found throughout the collection, information pertaining to the other topics is found chiefly in the Correspondence, Memoranda, Writings and Speeches, Printed Material, and Clippings Series. A typescript of Slattery's autobiography, From Roosevelt to Roosevelt, Washington, D.C., 1948, and information relating to the published work Rural America Lights Up, Washington, D.C., 1940, which is attributed to Slattery, are found in the Writings and Speeches and Scrapbooks Series. Persons studying conservation issues in the United States and the spread of electricity to rural areas would find this collection particularly helpful.

There is extensive material relating to the controversy surrounding the Rural Electrification Administration, tensions between the REA and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, whose executive manager was Clyde Ellis, and the conflict between Slattery and the Secretary of Agriculture Claude W. Wickard. Correspondents include Harold L. Ickes, Judson King, Basil Maxwell Manly, Gifford Pinchot, Amos R. Pinchot, John Patrick Grace, Cornelia B. Pinchot, and Philip Patterson Wells.

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Naturalist, conservationist, and local historian, of Wiggins (Colleton County), S.C. Chiefly personal correspondence (1910-1935) relating to the preservation of fauna in South Carolina and the Southeast, and to U.S. and South Carolina politics and history, family and business affairs, literature, and journalists. Includes a few clippings, photographs, and documents concerning Rice's life. Correspondents include William Watts Ball, Bernard Baruch, Coleman L. Blease, James F. Byrnes, Basil L. Gildersleeve, Ambrose E. Gonzales, William E. Gonzales, Dubose Heyward, Duncan C. Heyward, Thomas G. McLeod, Hugh McRae, Marie Conway Oemler, Gifford Pinchot, F. W. Ruckstull, Harry A. Slattery, and Benjamin R. Tillman.

The papers of James Henry Rice, Jr., naturalist, conservationist, and local historian, contain mainly correspondence reflecting his interest in natural history and the protection of wildlife; the history and contemporary politics of South Carolina; and family, business, artistic, and journalistic matters.

Material pertaining to Rice's activities as a naturalist and conservationist include letters, 1910-1913, to Rice from the Carolina Audubon Society and the National Association of Audubon Societies; correspondence, 1913-1917, with Robert Ridgway, E. H. Forbush, William Brewster, and officials of the National Museum in Washington, D.C., relating to Rice's work as inspector for the United States Biological Survey, concerning ornithology, particularly the breeding grounds, habitats, and migratory patterns of various Southeastern birds; long-term correspondence with Arthur Trezevant Wayne, author of Birds of South Carolina (Charleston: 1910); correspondence, 1927-1935, with William Chambers Coker, primarily concerning the identification of certain botanical specimens; correspondence concerning the Conservation Society of South Carolina; letters of naturalist Frank M. Chapman and explorer Carl E. Akely; correspondence with R. W. Shufeldt on natural history; letters concerning Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall and the Teapot Dome Scandal, 1921-1922; correspondence concerning forest lands in South Carolina with Courtlandt Braun, W. R. Mattoon of the United States Forest Service, and South Carolina state foresters, Lewis E. Staley, 1928-1931, and W. A. Smith, 1932; correspondence with W. T. Hornaday on conservation measures in the United States Congress, especially the Norbeck bill, 1929, which sought to impose hunting limits on ducks; correspondence, 1930, concerning the relationship of the National Association of Audubon Societies to the manufacturers of guns and ammunition; and letters relating to the meeting of the American Ornithologists Union in Charleston, South Carolina, 1928.

Correspondence on South Carolina politics and the state's history includes letters giving the views of various candidates for state and national office and commenting on elections and other political events; letters, 1905-1918, from United States Senator Benjamin R. Tillman; correspondence with Coleman L. Blease, governor of South Carolina, on the appointment of state game wardens, 1911-1913; correspondence relating to several articles written by Rice on local history and notable South Carolinians, especially "The Paladins of South Carolina," a series appearing in the State (Columbia, South Carolina) in 1922-1923, containing material on Martin W. Gary and Reconstruction in South Carolina, and Francis Wilkinson Pickens Butler's letters about Matthew Calbraith Butler; correspondence concerning the histories of the Rice, Elliott, Stuart, Clarkson, and Smith families, letters, 1929, discussing the life and career of J. Marion Sims; and correspondence, ca. 1926, with Dudley Jones on the history of the Presbyterian Church in South Carolina.

Items pertaining to business, literature, journalism and Rice's family include letters from George F. Mitchell on the development of coastal South Carolina; correspondence regarding a stock law for South Carolina, 1920-1921; correspondence with writers and academics including Marie Conway Oemler, Archibald Rutledge, Harriette Kershaw Leiding, William Peterfield Trent, Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, and Ambrose E. Gonzales; correspondence with Dubose Heyward and John Bennett concerning the Poetry Society of South Carolina; letters from Francis Butler Simkins, Jr., 1922-1923, responding to Rice's criticism of his work; correspondence relating to Rice's work as agent for the Chee-Ha Combahee Company promoting the development of coastal lands, 1921-1922; letters concerning the development of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina,1925; a long personal correspondence with the sculptor Frederick Wellington Ruckstull containing news of Rice's family and exchanges of opinion on politics, art, and history; letters from many of Rice's friends in the 1930s showing the effects of the Depression; and letters discussing Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal.

Printed matter and miscellaneous items in the collection include eulogies of Rice, several articles reflecting his interest in history and nature; report of the game warden of South Carolina, 1912; minutes of the 1932 meeting of the alumni association of the University of South Carolina; poems by Rice; and pamphlets and articles on natural history.

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John Patrick Grace papers, 1902-1940 26 Linear Feet — 12,082 Items

Politician and journalist, of Charleston, S.C. Personal and legal papers. Includes material on Charleston and South Carolina politics; the Charleston American, a newspaper founded by Grace; anti-English feeling at the time of World War I; American sympathy for Irish nationalism; enforcement of the Espionage Act against Grace for his wartime editorials; land speculation in Florida during the 1920s; Grace's speaking engagements on behalf of Alfred E. Smith (1928); his opposition to Roosevelt's nomination in 1932; and his attitude toward world events in the 1930s.

The Grace papers are divided into several series: Correspondence, Miscellany, Legal and Financial Papers, Clippings and Printed Material, and Volumes.

The bulk of the collection lies in the Correspondence series, dating 1908-1940, with topics ranging from Grace's personal news, business adventures, and his political career. The early letters, pre-1920, are largely concerned with Charleston politics. Correspondence from the mayoralty election of 1915, the election of the U.S. representative from South Carolina in 1916, and the mayoralty election of 1919 all reveal the corruption and violence that regularly accompanied Charleston elections in the early twentieth century. Grace was a candidate for mayor in 1911, 1915, and 1919. He appears to have been considered an upstart in Charleston politics; at least he claimed to be opposed to the rule of the reactionary aristocrats who, he thought, had controlled Charleston. Since Grace was Roman Catholic, religious prejudice was often injected into the elections campaigns in which he was active, particularly for the election of 1919.

The corruption of Charleston elections was also demonstrated by several governors when they called out the militia to keep the peace in Charleston during elections (for example, 1919), by the murder of a Grace man in 1915, and Grace's charge that Francis Marion Whaley bought his seat in the House of Representatives in the election of 1916. This accusation led to a hearing in the House of Representatives, which decided against an investigation, claiming a lack of evidence to support the charge of corruption.

Another large amount of correspondence stems from Grace's publishing of the Charleston American, a daily morning paper begun in 1916. From the many letters concerning the founding and progress of the paper, the problems and great expense connected with the publication of a daily paper become apparent. Also, there are comparisons of the progress of the Charleston American with the established News and Courier.

In his Charleston American editorials, Grace regularly criticized the ongoing war in Europe. His pro-Irish opinions were accompanied by accusations that England had begun the war in order to preserve its naval and commercial superiority. He wrote that the United States had been flooded by British propaganda, and considered British naval policy to be a more flagrant violation of neutrality than German submarine attacks.

Grace wanted the United States to observe strict neutrality, as Wilson had proposed. When the United States entered the war, Grace was extremely angry, calling it "Wilson's War." His editorials were so critical of Wilson and so pro-German that Grace, on the basis of the Espionage Act, was cited to appear for a hearing, and the Charleston American temporarily lost its third class mailing privilege.

Although Grace did not hold office after 1923, he was active in politics until his death. Correspondents included Governors Thomas Gordon McLeod (1923-1927), John Gardiner Richards (1927-1931), Ihra C. Blackwood (1931-1935), and Olin D. Johnston (1925-1939). Grace appeared closest to Richards, asking and receiving many favors. Grace despised Blackwood, however, and denounced him publicly for removing Grace from the state's highway commission.

Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, Grace also corresponded with a number of national politicians. In 1922, he received a letter from his friend and Representative from South Carolina, W. Turner Logan, who spoke of joining the "Bolsheviks, Borah, LaFollette and Frasier," and explained that this alignment was not a third party movement but "simply progressive." Grace also exchanged letters with Millard E. Tydings, James F. Byrnes, Hamilton Fish, Jr., James A. Reed, Pat McCarran, George W. Norris, James E. Murray, Eugene Talmadge, Ellison D. Smith, and William W. Ball.

Grace was active in the presidential election of 1928, and was invited by Tydings to make a series of addresses in behalf of Alfred E. Smith, the Democratic candidate. In the course of this election, some of Grace's letters reveal his political philosophy, and this was elaborated in his letters during the 1930s. In connection with the presidential election of 1932, Grace was sorely disappointed when Franklin D. Roosevelt won the Democratic nomination over Al Smith. Grace accused Roosevelt of being an ingrate and an opportunist, and remained a severe critic of Roosevelt, especially concerning Roosevelt's treatment of the Supreme Court.

Also of interest in correspondence from the 1920s are Grace's speculation in Florida real estate, his losses growing out of the depression, and his opinion (from 1934) as to the causes of the depression.

During the 1930s, Grace wrote at length on world politics. The letters are particularly good for discerning his political philosophy, his reasoning with respect to the entrance of the United States into World War I, and his opinion as to the developments in Europe that led to World War II. While he disapproved of some of Hitler's tactics, Grace wrote in 1938 that Hitler was one of the greatest men of the day. Important also is the long letter from George Norris explaining why he had voted against the entrance of the United States into World War I.

The Legal and Financial Papers series, dated 1885-1939, includes documents connected with the business of the Charleston American, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Co., the Cooper River Bridge Co., the Whaley hearing, and the O.B. Limehouse Case, among others. Cases are arranged alphabetically; the remainder of the series is sorted chronologically. The financial papers also contain many bills and receipts.

The remaining papers are sorted into Miscellany, Clippings, and Printed Material. The Volumes series includes three scrapbooks of newspaper clippings.

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Josiah William Bailey papers, 1833-1967, bulk 1900-1946 270 Linear Feet — 539 boxes — Approximately 422,400 itemss

The collection houses the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. Chiefly consists of correspondence and print material, as well as smaller amounts of financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items dating from 1900 through 1946. The collection documents Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the U.S. Senate in 1931 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. After 1931, material chiefly pertains to national affairs. Significant topics include: state and national elections and campaigns in the 1920s and 1930s; national defense and the military; veterans; the effects of the Depression on southern states and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; Prohibition; the court system; taxation; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parks; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration. Legal papers offer a sample of case files from Bailey's law office, including a 1920s case involving W.V. Guerard of the Klu Klux Klan. Outgoing personal correspondence contains many references to national and regional issues as well as personal exchanges.

Collection comprises the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), noted Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. The material covers many aspects of Bailey's life and career and provides rich information on North Carolina and the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, particularly for the Depression years and World War II.

The papers are comprised chiefly of correspondence and supporting printed material, although there are also financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia, dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items falling in the period from 1900 through 1946.

The collection documents Josiah W. Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life and indicates the wide range of his intellectual interests throughout his adult years. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the United States Senate in 1930 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. During the senatorial years, material pertaining to national affairs predominates. Topics chiefly relate to national defense, the effects of the Depression on Southern States and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; prohibition; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parklands; the state and Supreme Court systems; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration.

The chronological division between the Pre-Senatorial Series and the Senatorial Series was established at December 31, 1930. There is occasional overlap among topical files within a series (such as that among Agriculture, Taxation, and Taxation: Revaluation in the Pre-Senatorial Series) or between series in some cases. When possible, cross references and other notes have been provided in the inventory. The researcher, however, should be aware of these relationships as they apply to specific research topics.

Much of Bailey's outgoing correspondence consists of form letters and perfunctory acknowledgments, but there are also many lengthy and articulate letters. It should be noted that the correspondence in the Personal Series is comprised mainly of family letters, many of which are informative about political issues of the day. Letters from Bailey to his wife, Edith Pou Bailey, and to his father-in-law, James Hinton Pou, are particularly informative.

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The Radical and Labor Pamphlets Collection (1896-1967) includes approximately 720 pamphlets and other ephemeral publications relating to communism, socialism and other left-wing movements as well as to labor organizations and trade unions. There are some additional pamphlets related to anti-communist movements and some examples of Soviet propaganda.

The Radical and Labor Pamphlets Collection spans the years from 1896 to 1967, with the bulk of the dates falling between 1911 and 1954, and is made up of publications relating to communism, socialism and other left-wing movements as well as to labor parties and trade unions. Subjects represented are: the Communist Party in the U.S. and Great Britain; socialism in the U.S. and other countries; radical youth organizations; political trials and persecutions of radical activists; labor organizations; anti-fascist and pacifist movements; anarchist organizations; anti-Communist propaganda; Soviet propaganda; and Soviet-Western relations. Other significant topics include economic justice, electoral campaigns, human rights issues, the role of women and youth in activist movements, unemployment, housing, fascism in Spain and other contemporary war issues.

There are many important individual authors represented in this collection, including Israel Amter, Arthur Clegg, Georgi Dimitrov, Emma Goldman, Gilbert Green, Grace Hutchins, Mikhail Ivanovich Kalinin, Corliss Lamont, Clare Booth Luce, Philip Murray, Harry Pollitt, Karl Radek, Iosif Stalin, Lev Trotskii, and many others. Many pamphlets were produced anonymously under the aegis of institutions: these include the Communist Party, USA, Socialist Labor Party, Young Communist League, International Labor Defense, Civil Rights Congress, Communist International, Congress of Industrial Organizations, Farmer's Labor Unions, American Federation of Labor, Friends of the Soviet Union, and many more.

The pamphlets are arranged by subject categories, with the largest groups relating to the activities and membership of the Communist and Socialist parties. There is a small group of pamphlets chiefly made up of radical and labor song collections from 1912 to 1950. The majority of the pamphlets were produced in the United States and Great Britain, but there are also smaller groups of materials from Russia, India, Australia, Canada, China, Ireland, Italy, Brazil, the Philippines, and Mexico.

Many of these publications are ephemeral, that is, focused on urgent contemporary issues and generally intended for immediate consumption or short-term use. For this and for other reasons, they were often printed on poor quality paper which now shows signs of severe deterioration. The results are that few of these publications remain in circulation, and researchers may find many of them difficult to locate in library collections.

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Robert Newton Page papers, 1892-1930, bulk 1916-1920 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 2,764 Items

Bank president and U.S. Representative from North Carolina. Correspondence, clippings, and other papers (largely 1916-1920) relating chiefly to Page's resignation from Congress and his 1920 North Carolina gubernatorial campaign. Includes information on Page's congressional career, as well as letter from Page's brother, Walter Hines Page, while ambassador to England describing the English countryside and his activities as ambassador. Correspondents include Claude Kitchin, Angus Wilton McLean, and Charles Manly Stedman.

The papers in this collection deal largely with Page's resignation from Congress and his gubernatorial race in 1920. Most of the letters were written before his defeat in the first primary in 1920. The clippings deal exclusively with that race. The printed material contains not only papers of a political nature but also literature of the first World War period urging the purchase of War Savings Stamps.

The letter book (1916) is comprised solely of telegrams and letters which both oppose and applaud Page's refusal to seek re-election to Congress because Wilson had asked Congress to make the decision as to whether or not American citizens should be warned to stay off vessels of belligerent countries, which decision he thought Wilson should make himself. In 1916 Page wrote to his constituents explaining his stand and stating that the large loan to England by American capitalists and the profits of munition makers had destroyed even the semblance of neutrality in the U.S.

The letters from his constituents begin in 1904. In 1916 some of them wrote Page to oppose preparedness. On July 22, 1914 Page's brother, Walter Hines, then ambassador to England, wrote from a country house out from London which they had rented for three months. He speaks of the beauty of the English countryside, the life of an ambassador to England, his approval of what that session of Congress had done, and his close relations with the British Foreign Office (claims he induced the British government to keep quiet about Mexico).

Among the other papers, there is an invitation to a prohibition banquet in December 1916; a 1916 report on what had been accomplished among the natives of Alaska with the appropriations granted to the Bureau of Education by Congress; 1918 report of the N. C. Council of Defense to Gov. Thomas W. Bickett on its first year of war work; letters in 1918 and 1919 from people pledging their support to Page as a candidate for the governorship of N.C., a letter of December 28, 1918 from H.E.C. Bryant in which the author freely expresses his opinion as to Cameron Morrison and the role he thinks Sen. Furnifold M. Simmons and a number of other N. C. politicoes might play in the next gubernatorial election; letters attacking the political machine of Simmons, who supported Morrison in the 1920 campaign, and accusing Sen. Lee Overman of taking orders from Simmons; copy of an address delivered by Page on Mar. 11, 1920 to the students at the Univ. of N.C.; campaign literature; and a copy of Gardner for Governor Bulletin, April 1920.