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Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

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Resident of Richmond, Va., socialist and grassroots political activist in his early life; founder of the Southern Electoral Reform League; later sided with conservatives such as Barry Goldwater and George Wallace. The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics, including segregationist platforms. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, the Virginia Electoral Reform League, and the United States Information Service. The papers include correspondence with a wide spectrum of national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, founded by George primarily to campaign against poll taxes, and the United States Information Service. The papers include files of correspondence with a wide spectrum of prominent national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. There are also several files of correspondence relating to George's business ventures in Mexico, particularly his interests and operations in mining in the Chihuahua region.

George's writings, including many editorials and letters to the editor, and correspondence reveal his complex and shifting allegiances to various reform organizations during particularly eventful decades for the labor movement in the U.S. His work for labor-related causes in different guises put him in at least tacit opposition to positions he had advocated earlier. He also offers often contradictory views on race, supporting local black politicians at one point but joining the segregationist Citizens Council later in his life. In addition, George's experiences during the McCarthy Era demonstrate the lasting professional consequences of the alleged Communist ties in his past.

Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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Democratic Digest records, 1953-1961 and undated 23 Linear Feet — Approx. 9300 Items

Official magazine of the Democratic National Committee, published monthly in Washington D.C. Its editors were Clayton Fritchey, Sam Brightman, and Philip M. Stern, with political cover art by Leo Hershfield. Collection contains editorial files of the Democratic Digest, dating from 1953-1961, with the contents of the files falling into three large categories: correspondence, editorial, and art files. The correspondence includes many letters from readers, critics, and Democratic Senators and Governors, chiefly in response to political issues of the day such as McCarthyism, corruption, civil rights, economics, labor, nuclear weapons, farm subsidies, party politics, and elections. Editorial files contain edited copy for articles and columns; TV and radio scripts, including speeches by Democratic candidates; and many clippings reprinted in the Digest. About a third of the collection consists of hundreds of pieces of original layout art, including political cartoons by Leo Hershfield and others, and a few photographs of political leaders such as Truman, Stevenson, and Johnson. Finally, a smaller group of printed materials published for the Democratic 1960 national campaign includes political leaflets, pamphlets, party platforms and position papers, a newsprint publication examining of the records of Nixon and Kennedy, and a few other items.

Collection contains editorial files of the Democratic Digest, dating from 1953-1961, with the contents of the files falling into three large categories: correspondence, editorial, and art files. The correspondence files, arranged in alphabetical order, include telegrams and memoranda between the Democratic Digest staff, the Democratic National Committee and other organizations, and many letters from readers, critics, and Democratic Senators and Governors, chiefly responding to political issues of the day, such as McCarthyism, scandals and corruption, civil rights, the American economy, labor, farm subsidies, nuclear weapons, war, and elections, and offering criticism on the content of the publication. There is also some personal correspondence.

Voluminous editorial files contain nearly complete content for issues, and are filed in publication order by month and year, 1955-1961. The files enclose copy for articles and columns, with many corrections and layout notes; condensed versions of TV and radio addresses, including speeches by Democratic candidates; and many clippings from original articles reprinted in the Digest, attached to the magazine's own copy. Some of this material is brittle and fragile.

About a third of the collection consists of hundreds of pieces of original layout art, printers proofs of covers, and political cartoons, and a handful of photographs of Democratic leaders of the time such as Truman, Stevenson, and Johnson (Box 25). For an unknown reason, there is also a portrait of Durham native and Duke alumnus and benefactor William Washington Flowers. A few complete copies of the Digest are sometimes included in the artwork files next to associated cover art. There are many examples of production artists' layout materials that include original art and sketches, and paste-ups on boards with directions for layout. The original art for the cover cartoons by noted illustrator Leo Hershfield is rendered in vivid watercolors. The artwork and layouts are loosely arranged in chronological order.

Finally, a smaller group of printed materials deriving from the Democratic 1960 national campaign includes political leaflets, pamphlets, party platforms and position papers, a newsprint publication examining of the records of Nixon and Kennedy, and a few other items.

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Nelson Frank papers, 1908-1961 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 290 Items

Government official and labor columnist of the New York News World-Telegraph and Sun, of New York City. The papers of Nelson Frank chiefly concern the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations and their affiliated unions; communism in the labor movement; the 1952 strike of the United Steel Workers of America; and the careers of Philip Murray and Walter Reuther. Includes press releases, newsletters, circulars, radio scripts, and reports.

The papers of Nelson Frank chiefly concern the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations and their affiliated unions; communism and socialism in the labor movement; the 1952 strike of the United Steel Workers of America; and the careers of prominent American labor leaders Philip Murray (1886-1952) and Walter Reuther (1907-1970). Includes press releases, newsletters, circulars, radio scripts, and reports.