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Collection

Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

Online
Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Series
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in Appalachia and the rural South in the 1940s and 1950s.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

Collection
Online
American educator, born a slave in Franklin County, Virginia. Founder and president of Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. Collection comprises correspondence and related material concerning the Carnegie Hall conference (January 6-8, 1904) and the subsequent formation of the Committee of Twelve for the Advancement of the Negro Race by Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois. The letters in the collection document the Committee of Twelve's work, contain commentary on the status of African Americans, and detail Washington's relationships with many of the key African American leaders of his day. The most striking is Washington's correspondence with W.E.B. Du Bois, where the tension and ideological conflict between the two men is clearly demonstrated. Other prominent correspondents include Charles W. Chesnutt, John S. Durham, Thomas Fortune, Marcus Garvey, Archibald Grimké; Francis J. Grimké, James Weldon Johnson, Judson W. Lyons, Fredrick L. McGhee, Whitefield McKinlay, Kelly Miller, Robert R. Moton, Charles W. Russell, Emmett J. Scott, and Alexander Walters. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection comprises over 90 pieces of correspondence and related materials concerning the Carnegie Hall Conference (January 6-8, 1904) and the subsequent formation of the Committee of Twelve for the Advancement of the Interest of the Negro Race. The conference was a critical event in the early history of the African American civil rights movement. It was organized by Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois, and it brought together many of the most prominent African American leaders in the United States. The Committee broke up in 1905 due to differences between the leaders.

The letters in the collection provide documentary evidence for the Committee of Twelve's evolution and work, as well as commentary on the status of African Americans. They detail Washington's relationships with many of the key African American leaders of his day. The most striking is Washington's correspondence with W.E.B. Du Bois, where the tension and ideological conflict between the two men is clearly demonstrated. Other prominent correspondents include Charles W. Chesnutt, John S. Durham, Thomas Fortune, Marcus Garvey, Archibald Grimké; Francis J. Grimké, James Weldon Johnson, Judson W. Lyons, Fredrick L. McGhee, Whitefield McKinlay, Kelly Miller, Robert R. Moton, Charles W. Russell, Emmett J. Scott, and Alexander Walters.

Other materials in the collection include copies of the pamphlet "Why disfranchisement is bad" (July 1904); a photocopy of and a copy of the original article, "The estimate of an eminent Virginian of the merit of the book THE WHITE MAN'S BURDEN"; and a poem, "The Empty Sleeve".

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

Chuck Stone papers, 1931-2007 and undated 36.2 Linear Feet — 18,650 items

Charles Sumner (Chuck) Stone was a prominent African-American journalist, with a career spanning from his early days at the New York Age (1958-1959) to his position as editor and columnist at the Philadelphia Daily News (1972-1991). Between 1965 and 1967 he was special assistant and press secretary to New York representative Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. He served as mediator between the police and suspected criminals for over 20 years, most notably in his negotiation of the Graterford Prison hostage crisis in 1981. He is the author of multiple books, from political analyses to a novel about his time with Powell and (in 2003) a children's book. He was also an educator for many years, as Professor of English at the University of Delaware from 1985-1991 and Walter Spearman Professor of Journalism at UNC-Chapel Hill from 1991 to 2005, when he retired. The collection contains clippings, correspondence, writings, scrapbooks, photographs, research files, and printed materials pertaining to the life and career of Chuck Stone. The papers span the years 1931-2007 and document Stone's journalism career and writings, his political career and relationship with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and his role as an educator.

The Chuck Stone Papers span the years 1931 to 2007. The collection consists of clippings and other print materials, correspondence, writings, scrapbooks, photographs, a videotape, research files, and diplomas and certificates pertaining to the life and career of Chuck Stone. Of the subject areas documented here are Stone's career as a prominent African-American journalist, his political career and relationship with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (including Powell's time as head of the Congressional Committee on Education and Labor), his role as a mediator between suspects and the criminal justice system, and his involvement in civil rights struggles in the United States. Also represented, but to a much lesser extent, is his teaching career at the University of Delaware and UNC-Chapel Hill. The collection is divided into nine series, each described below. Of these, the largest by far are the Clippings and the Subject Files series, which document respectively Stone's journalistic writings (especially during his time at the Philadelphia Daily News) and his research interests over the years, including racial politics in the U.S., African-Americans in the media, the criminal justice system, censorship and free speech, and standardized testing. The collection was acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation.

The Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Congressional Series documents Stone's time as press secretary and special assistant to Powell. It contains office and business correspondence both to and from Stone; clippings and other printed materials about Powell or the Committee on Education and Labor; office files on individual members of congress (notably Florida Democrat Sam Gibbons, partly responsible for the campaign to remove Powell from his position as head of the Committee); files related to the workings of the Committee; press releases written by Stone; and a number of papers relating to Powell's exclusion from Congress in 1967. This series should be useful both for those interested in the career of Powell, since Stone worked for him during a pivotal time in his career, and for those interested in the workings of the Committee on Education and Labor during that time.

The Clippings Series is made up predominantly of Stone's columns from the Philadelphia Daily News and the NEA Viewpoint (a Newspaper Enterprise Association column syndicated by United Media), as well as articles about Stone from various newspapers, and some writings by Stone appearing in other newspapers. Topics addressed by Stone in his columns include racial politics in the U.S., Philadelphia politics, the media, Ireland, Stone's travels in Africa, women's issues and feminism, the criminal justice system, and standardized testing. Researchers interested in Stone's journalism career prior to 1972 will find some earlier clippings here, but should consult the Scrapbooks Series for more extensive materials and clippings from that period.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence to and from Stone relating to business and personal matters. The majority of this series is made up of general correspondence or correspondence relating to Stone's position as editor and columnist of the Philadelphia Daily News. The remainder of the series comprises topical folders of correspondence, such as the correspondence between Stone and Edward M. Ryder, an inmate at Graterford Prison. Other such correspondence can be found in the "Criminal justice system" subsection of the Subject Files Series.

The Other Writings Series houses Stone's writings not contained in the Clippings Series, such as speeches, sermons, and television transcripts; business documents and research files pertaining to different projects on which Stone worked, such as his attempts to develop his own life or his writings on Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. into a movie, or various uncompleted book projects; and a small subset of writings by others, including an autobiography of Corinne Huff on which Stone worked. It is divided into three subseries to accommodate the restriction on the collection: the Published Writings by Stone Subseries, the Unpublished Writings by Stone Subseries, and the Writings by Others Subseries. Notably absent from this series are manuscripts of Stone's books. Instead, the series contains either shorter published materials, such as publicly delivered speeches, or working documents assembled for the creation of larger works.

The Scrapbooks Series houses the contents of four scrapbooks assembled by Stone during the 1950s and 1960s. They contain a number of clippings, programs, and some correspondence pertaining to his time at the New York Age, the Washington Afro-American, the Chicago Defender, and working for Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. The series is especially useful for documenting Stone's early career and his position as an outspoken African-American journalist and defender of civil rights. Researchers interested in this period in Stone's life should also consult the Clippings Series for more materials from the period in question that are not present in the scrapbooks.

The St. Louis Series is a small series housing clippings and correspondence related to Stone's brief position as ombudsman for the St. Louis Post-Disptach, overseeing their coverage of the 1997 mayoral election. The series is divided into a Published Materials Subseries, which houses clippings from the Post-Dispatch and related newspapers, and an Unpublished Materials Subseries, in which can be found correspondence, business documents, and responses to several readers polls conducted by Stone.

In the Subject Files Series can be found Stone's research files on different subject areas, arranged alphabetically. The files contain primarily clippings, but also some correspondence and notes. Several subcategories that are heavily represented and should be mentioned are the files on censorship and the first amendment, on the criminal justice system, on standardized testing, and on materials relating to his time at UNC-Chapel Hill. There are also numerous files related to racial politics in the U.S., but these files are less discrete than the categories described above and are to be found throughout the series rather than under a specific subheading.

The Teaching Materials Series contains a small amount of material pertaining to Stone's teaching career. The bulk of this series comes from his time at UNC-Chapel Hill, and includes syllabi, exams, assignments, student papers, and other teaching paperwork. Most heavily represented in this regard is Stone's popular class on censorship, for which there are multiple syllabi and exams from different years and semesters.

Finally, the Audiovisual Materials Series collects photographs touching on all aspects of Stone's life, from press photos of Stone and Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. to family portraits. Also included in this series are a videotape of a documentary about Powell, press passes and identification badges, and an election pin kept by Stone.

Unprocessed Addition 2009-0009 (50 items; .2 lin. ft.; dated 1963-2005) comprises primarily photographs, but also contains a few letters, clippings, awards, and a dvd-r. The original DVD-R is closed to patron use; however, the information on the disk has been migrated to the electronic records server.

Addition 2012-0099 has been processed and included in the original collection's description as boxes 64-66. Some parts of this addition have been interfiled into existing boxes.

Collection
Personal papers, correspondence, and writings of Earnest Sevier Cox, a white supremacist who advocated for the separation of the races and supported the Back to Africa movement in the early 20th century.

The papers of Earnest Sevier Cox span the years 1821 to 1973, with the bulk dating from 1900 to 1964. The primary focus of the collection is Cox's advocacy for the separation of the races by the repatriation of blacks to Africa, which he actively pursued for over forty years. The Correspondence, Writings, Speeches, and Printed Material series most clearly reflect his interest in "separation not amalgamation." Figuring less prominently in the collection is his military service during World War I and his work as a real estate agent for the Laburnum Realty Corporation in Richmond, Va. His personal life is best represented in the correspondence he had with his family and in the Writings series.

As early as 1906, Cox held the belief that the Caucasian race was superior to the black race and that blacks should be kept in a segregated and unequal position. The year 1910 could be considered a turning point in Cox's life. By that time he had already tried several vocations. He had been a newspaper reporter, a teacher, and a minister, and had enrolled at the University of Chicago in graduate school, where he studied sociology. In 1910 he traveled to Africa to study the Negro under colonial rule; while there he broadened his interests to include a study of the amount of freedom that various European nations allowed their colonial subjects.

From 1910 until 1914, Cox traveled extensively in Africa and toured Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Panama, and South America. The unrest he became aware of among the races in South Africa is particularly reflected in the Clippings series. Cox was able to earn money on the trip by working in various mines and supplemented this income by occasional lectures and newspaper articles, some of which are also included in the Clippings series. After his return to the United States, he was asked to speak at various organizations particularly about his travels in Africa. Broadsides advertising these talks with titles like "1,800 Miles on Foot Through Darkest Africa" are included in the Speeches series.

It was the with the publication in 1923 of White America that he began to advocate the repatriation of blacks to Africa and to work with others to try to achieve it. Later editions of White America appeared in 1925, 1937, and 1966. Various drafts of this work can be found in the Writings series.

It is Cox's work with others to achieve repatriation that forms the crux of the collection. In his passion for the separation of the races and his belief in the superiority of the white race, he formed alliances with both white and black separatists. Viewpoints of both groups are included in the collection, chiefly in the Correspondence series. Among the black nationalists and associations represented are Marcus Garvey, Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), (ca. 1925 to 1939); Mittie Maude Lena Gordon, Peace Movement of Ethiopia (PME) , (ca. 1934 to 1958) ; and Benjamin Gibbons, Universal African Nationalist Movement, Inc. (UANM) , (ca. 1947 to 1963). Garvey, Gordon, and Gibbons are included in the Writings and Speeches of Others series as well.

The correspondence is particularly reflective of the unsuccessful efforts of Cox and others to get the repatriation bills of Senators Theodore Bilbo of Mississippi (ca. 1938 to 1947) and William Langer of North Dakota (ca. 1949 to 1959) passed into law. Both bills sought aid from the United States government to help blacks return to Africa. Senator Bilbo's bill was commonly referred to as the Greater Liberia Bill and was first introduced in 1939. Langer, who first introduced his bill in 1949, was to introduce the bill five more times before his death in 1959.

Cox was able to generate some publicity for the Langer bill in 1953. A hearing was held in June of that year before representatives of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Eight people appeared before the Committee, including Cox who spoke as a representative of the PME and as a spokesperson for repatriation. Cox published an article about the hearing, "I Witnessed a Miracle," in both a white racist and black nationalist magazine. The article appears in the Writings series.

Cox was also instrumental in getting the Virginia General Assembly to pass the Racial Integrity Law of 1924, which was designed in part to prevent the intermarriage of blacks and whites. John Powell, pianist-composer and a correspondent (ca. 1924 to 1954) of Cox, worked with him for its passage. Additionally Cox was involved with the passage of a resolution in 1936 by the Assembly which recommended that the U. S. Congress provide for the colonization of persons of African descent in Liberia or other places on the African continent.

One of the arguments Cox used to support the repatriation movement was to quote Abraham Lincoln, who he said promoted the separation and re-colonization of blacks. He published a pamphlet in 1938 with quotations from Lincoln to support this view entitled Lincoln's Negro Policy. This work is represented in the Writings series.

The U. S. Supreme Court's Brown vs. the Board of Education decision in 1954 made Cox a prophet in the minds of some whites. Almost overnight this decision helped create a multitude of right wing organizations whose primary purpose was to maintain the segregation of the races. Both the correspondence and printed material from this period are representative of this attitude. Much of the printed material provides graphic illustrations and strongly worded texts of the segregationist, anti-Supreme Court, anti-Semitic, and anti-Communist sentiments of the time, from a variety of right wing organizations.

Teutonic Unity was privately printed by Cox in 1951. The book purported to be a racial history covering the development of the Teutonic race from 2000 B.C. to the present. A copy of this work is located in the Writings series. In 1959, Cox was honored by fellow international racial separatists by being invited to speak at the First Annual Congress of the Northern League in Detmold, Germany. Although he was too ill to deliver the address himself, he was on the platform while English and German interpreters read it for him. Both his paper titled "Herman's Brother" and a printed program of the conference are included in the Speeches and Writings and Speeches of Others series respectively. The paper concerned the need for Teutonic peoples to maintain their bloodlines.

Cox continued writing until shortly before his death. One of the works, which is included in the Writings series, Black Belt Around the World, was published in 1963. It is an autobiographical work containing information about his travels from 1910 to 1914.

He was working on Lincoln's Negro Policy at the time of his death. It was to be a compilation of a number of his essays that had been published earlier. The work included an essay of the same title that is mentioned above. The work, which was completed by Drew L. Smith, was published in 1972, six years after Cox's death. Information about the completion and distribution of this work is included in the Edith Wood Nelson series.

Correspondents not previously mentioned but represented in the papers are listed below, along with the approximate dates of their correspondence: Wickliffe P. Draper, (ca. 1936 to 1949); Madison Grant, (ca. 1920 to 1936) ; S. A. Davis, (ca. 1925 to 1962) ; W. A. Plecker, (ca. 1924 to 1947); Willis A. Carto, (ca. 1955 to 1967); and Amy Jacques Garvey, widow of Marcus Garvey, (ca. 1926 to 1965).

Cox held onto his repatriation beliefs until his death. In a will dated December 15, 1965, four months before he died, he directed the executors of his estate to send any excess monies toward the "repatriation movement of American Negroes to Africa."

A doctoral dissertation has been written based in large part on the Cox papers. Titled Earnest Cox and Colonization: A White Racist's Response to Black Repatriation, 1923-1966, it was written by Ethel Wolfskill Hedlin and submitted to Duke University in 1974.

Collection

James H. Karales photographs, 1953-2006 and undated 18 Linear Feet — Approximately 15,000 items

Online
James Karales was an American photojournalist on staff at Look magazine. Collection houses the archive of photojournalist James Karales, active from the 1950s to the 1980s. The majority of the images in the collection originated from his work for Look magazine during the 1960s. Major projects document Rendville, Ohio, a coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; the Vietnam War; New York's Lower East Side; Oregon logging; and the 1960s Civil Rights movement, including photographs of Martin Luther King, Jr. There may be racially mixed persons appearing in the Rendville series. Smaller projects document California, New Mexico, the Andrea Doria disaster, and other subjects. Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to almost all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints in a range of sizes; original negatives (closed to research use); and over 1100 color slides. There are also print and biographical materials, some correspondence, and audiovisual materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The majority of the images in the collection originated from his work for Look magazine during the 1960s. His major projects include images from Rendville, Ohio, a coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; the Vietnam War; New York's Lower East Side; Oregon logging and the timber industry; and important individuals and events of the 1960s Civil Rights movement, including photographs of Martin Luther King, Jr. and activities of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. There may be racially mixed persons appearing in the Rendville and Lower East Side series. Other smaller projects include images of California, New Mexico, the Andrea Doria, and other subjects.

There are also supporting materials that include Karales' curriculum vitae; essays on photography and teaching; publicity for exhibits and other events; correspondence with publishers; digitized images from the Vietnam War on a CD; and clippings, magazine layouts, and other materials related to Karales' published work. An audiocassette contains remarks on Karales' life and works by Sam Stephenson at the opening of an exhibit of Karales' work at Duke University.

Formats in the collection include contact sheets; proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8 1/2 x 14 to 16 x 20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and over 1100 color slides. Unless otherwise noted, the photographic items are arranged in the following sequence in each series: contact sheets, prints (from smallest to largest), slides, negatives, and finally, duplicates. There are also digital jpeg files for selected images in certain series (Vietnam, Rendville).

Collection

Joshua Rashaad McFadden photographs, 2015-2016 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 20 prints — 20 color photographic prints

Collection consists of 20 13x19 inch color inkjet photographic collages featuring portraits of young African American men, taken by McFadden, paired with reproduction color portraits of their fathers when they were younger, and a handwritten personal narrative by each youth about what it means to be an African American man in the 21st century. There is also a print with McFadden and his father. Many of the fathers appear in military uniforms. Topics expressed in the personal narratives include stereotypes as well as new definitions of black masculinity; the construction of and attitudes towards race, gender, and sexuality; generational issues; and relationships with fathers. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 20 13x19 inch color inkjet photographic collages featuring portraits of young African American men, taken by McFadden, paired with reproduction color portraits of their fathers when they were younger, and handwritten personal narratives, one to three paragraphs long, by each youth about what it means to be an African American man in the 21st century. One print is of McFadden and his father, and includes a reproduction of his father's Selective Service card.

Topics expressed in the personal narratives include stereotypes as well as new definitions of black masculinity; the construction of and attitudes of others as well as themselves towards race, gender, and sexuality; generational issues; and relationships with fathers. Many of the fathers served in the Armed Forces, and appear in their portraits in military uniforms.

From the artist's statement: "How does one begin to challenge the misguided perceptions that decrease the quality of living for young African American men? Furthermore, how does the African American man position himself in a society that does not acknowledge his true identity? African American men and stories of their intersecting identities unrecognized in forums that allow these positive images to become a part of the dominant narrative of African American men. As a photographic artist, I chose to use contemporary portraiture, the vernacular image, qualitative data, and positioning to expose this narrative with Come to Selfhood."

"Come to Selfhood explores African American male identity, masculinity, notions about the father figure, and the photographic archive by providing a frame of reference that visually articulates the diverse identities of young Black men. By delving into ideas of history, role models, and varied experiences, Come to Selfhood makes the previously invisible Black man, accurately and meaningfully visible."

For this body of work, McFadden received the 2017 Duke University Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Documentarians of Color.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Kris Graves American Monuments photograph portfolio, 2020 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 16 prints; 1 printed sheet — sheet size: 16 x 20 inches

Kris Graves (1982- ) is an artist and publisher based in New York and California. The portfolio is made up of 16 images taken by Graves which speak to the Black Lives Matter civil rights movement as well as to public opinion about Confederate Civil War monuments. The photographs he shot at dusk and at night in July 2020 capture a series of projections superimposed onto a 60-foot tall statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, once part of Richmond, Virginia's iconic Monument Avenue. Run by multimedia artist Dustin Klein, the projections feature the faces of recent Black victims of white violence, including Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Christopher DeAndre Mitchell, Deborah Danner, Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. Several other photographs were taken by day and include a self-portrait at Stonewall Jackson's grave, and a monument in Tuskegee, Alabama, shrouded in a blue tarp. Includes printed sheet with essay by Diana McClure. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This photography portfolio is made up of 16 images taken by Kris Graves which speak to the Black Lives Matter civil rights movement as well as to public opinion about Confederate Civil War monuments. The photographs Graves shot at dusk and at night in July 2020 capture a series of projections superimposed onto a 60-foot tall statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, once part of Richmond, Virginia's Monument Avenue. The statue was removed from this location in 2021. Run by Dustin Klein, a Richmond-based multimedia artist, the projections feature the faces of recent Black victims of white violence, including Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Christopher DeAndre Mitchell, Deborah Danner, Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. A few other images were taken by day and include a self-portrait of the photographer at Stonewall Jackson's grave, and a monument in Tuskegee, Alabama, shrouded in a blue tarp.

The portfolio is number 9 of a limited edition of 15 and is housed in a blue fabric-covered clamshell box. It includes sixteen 16 x 20 inch color pigment inkjet prints, signed, titled and numbered, as well as a printed broadside sheet with an essay on Graves' work by Diana McClure, a writer, artist, photographer and cultural producer based in Brooklyn, New York.

Collection
Twentieth-century secret fraternal group held to confine its membership to American-born white Protestant Christians. Collection includes a broad range of Ku Klux Klan pamphlets, flyers, and other ephemera regarding Klan membership, Anglo-American values, protests against African Americans, Communists, or non-Protestant people, and promotional Klan events. Early material highlights activities of the Women of the Klan in Pennsylvania during the 1920s, including their charity work and fundraising for the Klan Haven, an orphanage. This material also includes large panoramic photographs of 1920s Klan reunions. Later materials from the 1960s are largely from the Southeast and mid-Atlantic States, and include literature, flyers, and handouts on Klan history, segregation, school integration, Communism, Catholicism, and Judaism.

Collection includes printed materials, apologetics, membership solicitations, circulars, brochures, pamphlets, broadsides, periodicals, cards, ephemera, and realia. Items were produced and distributed by various chapters of the Ku Klux Klan, dispersed throughout the United States, but largely originating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region. The KKK Collection also includes several panoramic photographs, assorted issues of Klan and other hate-group serial titles, and audio materials.

Materials have been acquired from a variety of sources and over several decades. Most of the collection has been arranged according to the geographic origin of the materials. Different branches and factions of the Klan are represented, including the United Klans of America, Women of the Ku Klux Klan, the Invisible Empire of the KKK, the Mississippi Green Knights, and the Mississippi White Knights.

Notable items include: a petition for the incorporation of a Klan chapter in Fulton Co., Georgia, in 1916; panoramic photographs and a wallet with Klan membership cards from Charles D. Johnson, a Florida Klansman in the 1930s; 1920s order forms for Klan robes, fiery crosses, and other Klan administrative materials from the Women of the Klan; pamphlets, circulars, and other literature opposing the Civil Rights movement, desegregation, and school integration, collected in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana in the 1960s; and recruitment flyers for rallies in Maryland, Ohio, and Pennsylvania during the 1980s.

Other items were first distributed during a talk by C. P. Ellis to freshmen students at a Duke University dormitory in 1969. Items include a 45-rpm sound disc with the songs "Flight NAACP 105" and "High ride"; a flyer regarding protests against the playing of the song "Dixie" at student events; a membership form for the North Carolina chapter; and printed items, including God is the Author of Segregation (1967) and issues of The Fiery Cross.

Collection

Libbie Ward papers, 1828-1913 and undated 1.2 Linear Feet — 110 Items

Ward served with the U.S. Christian Commission in hospitals in Louisville, Ky., and Nashville, Tenn., from 1864 to 1865, where she worked in the kitchens and as a general aide to the soldiers who spent brief periods there. Mainly letters between Libbie Ward and her family and friends.

Mainly letters (106 items, 1828-1913) between Sarah Elisabeth "Libbie" Ward and her family and friends. There are letters from other hospital workers, United States Christian Commission administrators, and family members of soldiers Ward tended. The bulk of the letters date from Libbie's time working for the U.S. Christian Commission at Foundry Hospital. Topics include health and illness, religion, death, politics and the war, and family life. Ward refers to arguments with friends and co-workers about women's rights and race, and discusses her changing opinions of African-Americans due to her work with them in the South. She writes, "There are some very intelligent and fine-looking colored men here I tell you it makes one feel bad to see so many who can neither read or write, who have so unfairly been deprived of the privilege." Includes two diaries, one combined with an account book. The diary, which comprises regular entries from 21 Sept. 1864 to 1 Jan. 1865, describes her daily routines in the kitchen and on the wards at the Louisville hospital and contains her thoughts on her day-to-day struggles, often using religious language. She mentions the 1864 Battle of Franklin's aftermath several times and refers to seeing "the noted female soldier." There is an additional diary combined with an account book that includes financial details from 1865-1870, a poem, a Union election advertisement, a telegram, an essay on Intemperance, and what appears to be letter drafts. Some early letters to her father are included and letters she wrote and received in her later life (1913) to and from young relatives. (01-039).

Collection

Lydia Howard Sigourney letter, undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a handwritten letter Lydia Howard Sigourney drafted as Secretary for the Hartford Ladies' Association for supplicating justice and mercy towards [sic?] the Indians, to request assistance with the circulation of a petition among the women of Hartford. The letter also discusses the political process behind the petition and its circulation. Includes a faint handwritten addendum, written in another person's hand, noting a decision not to send the letter. The item is undated, but possibly dates to the 1830s.