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Alexander Cuningham papers, 1740-1918 10 Linear Feet — 6,371 Items

Merchant, from Petersburg, Va. Business records and some personal correspondence of four generations of the Cuningham family, including Robert Cuningham; Alexander Cuningham, and his brother, Richard M. Cuningham; the latter's son, John Wilson Cuningham; and grandson, John Somerville Cuningham, all merchants and planters. The early papers center around Alexander and Richard's success as commission merchants for cotton and tobacco in Petersburg, Va., and the firm's planting interests in Person County, N.C. The collection also contains a few family letters, including some from Alexander Jr. while a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and from another son at Leasburg Academy, Caswell County, N.C. The papers of John Somerville Cuningham concern his work as a field agent for the Bureau of Crop Estimates, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, local politics, and family matters.

Business records and some personal correspondence of four generations of the Cuningham family, including Robert Cuningham; Alexander Cuningham, and his brother, Richard M. Cuningham; the latter's son, John Wilson Cuningham; and grandson, John Somerville Cuningham, all merchants and planters. The early papers center around Alexander and Richard's success as commission merchants for cotton and tobacco in Petersburg, Va., and the firm's planting interests in Person County, N.C. The collection also contains a few family letters, including some from Alexander Jr. while a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and from another son at Leasburg Academy, Caswell County, N.C. The papers of John Somerville Cuningham concern his work as a field agent for the Bureau of Crop Estimates, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, local politics, and family matters.

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Alfred Landon Rives papers, 1829-1888 and undated 1.2 Linear Feet — 1,211 Items

Army engineer, Confederate officer, and architect, of Albemarle County, Virginia. Collection consists primarily of Rives' correspondence, relating to his attendance at the École nationale des ponts et chaussées, Paris; his military and civilian careers; family matters and social, political, and economic affairs in Virginia; and the Washington Peace Convention (1861). Includes a diary (1829-1831) of Rives' mother, Judith Page Walker Rives, concerning life in the diplomatic community in Paris, travels on the continent, French social life and customs, the Revolution of 1830, U.S. political developments, and other matters. Also contains three ledgers of Francis E. Rives, U.S. Representative. Correspondents include Francis E. Rives, Julia Page Rives, and Edouard Schwebelé.

The Alfred Landon Rives Papers consist primarily Rives's correspondence, relating to his attendance at the École nationale des ponts et chaussées, Paris; his military and civilian careers; family matters and social, political, and economic affairs in Virginia; and the Washington Peace Convention (1861). Includes a diary (1829-1831) of Rives' mother, Judith Page Walker Rives, concerning life in the diplomatic community in Paris, travels on the continent, French social life and customs, the Revolution of 1830, U.S. political developments, and other matters. Also contains three ledgers of Francis E. Rives, U.S. Representative. Correspondents include Francis E. Rives, Julia Page Rives, and Edouard Schwebelé.

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Battaile Muse (1750-1803) was a planters' agent, of Berkeley Co., Va. (now Jefferson Co., W. Va.). Collection includes correspondence, account books, memoranda, and other papers. The collection concerns the movement from Tidewater farms to western Virginia, the progress of the Revolutionary War, sale of farm produce, the treatment of slaves, business operations, the Mercer (1776-1783) plantations and Fairfax estates, and Muse's career as a rental agent for George Washington in Frederick and Fauquier counties, Va. (1784-1792). Correspondents include W. M. Cary, Bryan Fairfax, Ferdinando Fairfax, G. W. Fairfax, Thomas Fairfax, J. L. Gervais, Tobias Lear, Richard Bland Lee, Warner Lewis, Stevens T. Mason, James Mercer, John Francis Mercer, Hugh Nelson, George Nicholas, John Hatley Norton, Thomas Rutherford, Magnus Tate, Hannah Fairfax Washington, George Washington, and Warner Washington.

Collection includes correspondence and papers of Battaile Muse (1750-1803), agent for large Virginia planters and plantation owners, relating to the desertion of Tidewater farms by Virginia planters for the more fertile areas in Loudoun, Fauquier, Frederick, and Berkeley counties; the progress of the Revolutionary War; planting and the sale of indigo and other farm products; the treatment of slaves, the estate of James and John Francis Mercer, 1776-1783; the Fairfax estate; and Muse's career as rental agent for George Washington in Frederick and Fauquier counties; 1784-1792. Included also are account books and memoranda listing rent collections and other business operations. Four letters, 1847-1848, relate to a dispute in the faculty of the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia.

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British-American Tobacco Company records, 1842-1929 150 Linear Feet — 372 volumes — 372 Items

The British-American Tobacco Company, Ltd., was established in 1902 by an agreement between the Imperial Tobacco Co. of Great Britain and its rivals, the American Tobacco Co. and its associates. These firms divided the world's market for manufactured tobacco products, and British-American took over trade with those territories not reserved to Imperial and American, that is, the export business everywhere outside Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, Cuba, and the U. S. and its overseas dependencies. Ownership of British-American was divided between its parent companies, American holding substantially two-thirds of the stock. The headquarters was located in London, England, and the office at 111 5th Ave. in New York City handled the purchase of leaf and manufacturing in the U. S.

This collection concerns British-American's business at Petersburg, Virginia, which included the branch under its own name and also the operations of its subsidiaries and predecessors. In 1903 the company acquired the formerly independent export businesses of the T. C. Williams Co., David Dunlop, and the Cameron family who were then the largest exporters of manufactured tobacco. They also had sales within the United States, so some domestic business is represented. British-American owned all of the stock of T. C. Williams and two-thirds of Dunlop's, both of these subsidiaries continuing to function under their own names, chiefly as producers of plug tobacco. However, the manufacturing of their brands was concentrated in a single bonded warehouse at Petersburg, a situation reflected in many account books that combine records of Dunlop, Williams, and British-American. There are also several volumes from the Bland Tobacco Co. of Petersburg and the Export Leaf Tobacco Co., the latter a subsidiary of British-American that functioned as its buying agency in the U. S. Further information about these companies is given below where their records are listed. A useful source for the early history of British-American is the U. S. Bureau of Corporations, Report of the Commissioner of Corporations on the Tobacco Industry (Washington, 1909). A folder of information about the companies and their owners is filed with the Guide in a box at the beginning of the collection. The Tobacco Collection includes examples of advertising.

This set of 367 account books represents the operations of British-American at Petersburg primarily during its first twenty years, 1903-1923, of which the first ten years have the more abundant records. The accounts of one subsidiary, David Dunlop, begin in 1842, continue into the 1920's, and constitute the most substantial group within the collection. Records of T. C. Williams are confined almost entirely to the period after 1903 when it was British-American's subsidiary, although the firm originated in the 1850's. Cameron & Cameron also began in the 1850's, but its records are limited to the last twelve years of its existence, 1892-1904. There are also a few volumes for the Export Leaf Tobacco Co., the Bland Tobacco Co., and William Cameron & Brother.

The account books are extensive and include significant records, but they are quite incomplete. Only David Dunlop has a considerable series of ledgers and journals. There are no minutes from meetings of directors or stockholders. The strength of the collection before 1903 is in the Dunlop records with the addition after 1892 of some from Cameron & Cameron, principally letterpress books. After 1903 there are elaborate cost, production, sales, and stock records for British-American, Dunlop, and T. C. Williams. Correspondence is very limited but includes some important material, there being volumes for David Dunlop in 1842-1846 and 1904-1906, T. C. Williams in 1903-1906, and Cameron & Cameron in 1895-1903.

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Clopton Family papers, 1629-1915 (bulk 1775-1897) 77 Linear Feet — 11,916 Items

Family correspondence and miscellaneous papers of four generations of the Clopton family and three generations of the Wallace family, centering in Virginia. The material ranges in date from 1629-1915 (bulk 1775-1897).

Family correspondence and miscellaneous papers of four generations of the Clopton family and three generations of the Wallace family, centering in Virginia. The earlier papers are genealogical records. Papers of John Clopton, Virginia legislator and U.S. Representative contain comments on politics in the Jeffersonian Republican Party, the Continental Congress, Jay's treaty, the Alien and Sedition acts, the Embargo act, and American relations with France. Letters to son, John Bacon Clopton, Virginia judge, relate to the operation of a plantation in New Kent County. Correspondence of Charles Montriou Wallace, Sr., a Richmond merchant, includes accounts of an overland journey to California (1849) and subsequent residence there, Reconstruction, and Virginia politics. Of interest also are Civil War letters from William Izard Clopton. Letters from a Richmond commission firm concern wartime and postwar business conditions. The collection also includes several memorandum books, scrapbooks, account books, legal casebooks, journals of trips to California, Texas and England, records of an unidentified temperance society, and financial records of a teacher.

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Dilmus J. Appleberry papers, 1810-1927, bulk 1850-1896 2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1,750 items

Business, family, and legal correspondence, accounts, bills, invoices, indentures, land surveys, and other papers. Correspondents whose names appear most often are Pettit and Leake, a legal firm of Goochland Court House, Va., Altantic and Virginia Fertilizing Co. of Richmond, Va., and Appleberry's nephew, Thomas A. Bledsoe.

This collection contains business, family, and legal correspondence of plantation owner Dilmus Appleberry. It is largely composed of accounts, bills, invoices, indentures, and land surveys. Letters, some of a business nature, comprise about five percent of the collection. Correspondents whose names appear most often are Pettit and Leake, a legal firm of Goochland Court House; Atlantic and Virginia Fertilizing Company of Richmond, Virginia; and Dilmus Appleberry's nephew, Thomas A. Bledsoe.

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George Rust papers, 1808-1879 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,343 Items

Businessman, militia officer, and Virginia state legislator, of Baltimore, Maryland, and Leesburg, Virginia. Collection houses correspondence and other papers of George Rust and of his family, relating to Rust's legislative career, his work on behalf of the Jacksonian Democrats, his investment activities in Maryland and Virginia banks and mercantile firms, and his association with the Virginia militia. Includes letters from members of the family in other sections of the United States.

Correspondence and other papers of Rust and of his family, relating to Rust's legislative career, his work on behalf of the Jacksonian Democrats, his investment activities in Maryland and Virginia banks and mercantile firms, and his association with the Virginia militia. Includes letters from members of the family in other sections of the U.S.

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Henry James Seibert papers, 1779-1912 and undated 15 Linear Feet — 16,658 Items

Lawyer, election clerk, and Virginia legislator, of Martinsburg and Hedgesville, Virginia (now West Virginia). Correspondence, account books, ledgers, and other professional, business, and family correspondence (chiefly 1820-1885), of Seibert and of his family. The collection relates to family matters, Virginia and national politics before the Civil War, migration into the Old Northwest, social life and customs, and slavery in Virginia.

Spanning the years 1779-1912, the collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and printed material of Henry James Seibert, Sr., Virginia state legislator, executor for numerous estates, and financial agent for emigrants to the Mid-West.

The correspondence discusses personal and family matters; internal improvements in Pennsylvania during the 1820s; salt mining in Pennsylvania; commodity and land prices in Ohio during the 1820s and 1830s; Ohio politics during the 1830s and the attitude of politicians towards the Second Bank of the United States; commodity prices in Illinois during 1838 and 1840; bank failures in Ohio, 1841; wages in Ohio, 1845; care of a ward of Henry James Seibert, Sr., in an insane asylum; the National Road in Ohio; presidential elections of 1840, 1844, 1848, 1852, and 1856; the National Democratic Convention of 1844; Henry Clay and the Whig Party; the slavery question in relation to the California Territory; improvement and construction of public buildings in Washington, D.C.; coal mining in Maryland; the Compromise of 1850; cholera in New Orleans, 1850s; internal improvements in Virginia, 1850s; control and sale of liquor and distillation of whiskey; slave trade in the United States; Civil War bounty; pension claims; and other matters.

Also included are bills and receipts; indentures; court summonses; account sheets; applications for pensions; prospectus, 1865, of The New Era, a newspaper to be published in Martinsburg, West Virginia; bulletin of Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts, for 1879; pamphlets containing West Virginia laws in 1887 relating to public schools; advertisements for the Maryland Lottery Company, the Kentucky State Lottery, cooking and heating stoves, women's fashions for 1884-1885, and patent medicines; Reformed Missionary Herald, 1889; almanacs; price current sheets for Baltimore, Maryland, in 1867 and 1869; premium list of the annual fair of the Ogle County (Illinois) Agricultural Board in 1881; ballots for the Greenback Party, the Democratic Party in Berkeley County (West Virginia) in 1880 and 1888, and the National Prohibition Party in 1884; pamphlet of the National Prohibition Party; form letter, 1849, explaining the stand of the Society of Friends of Great Britain and Ireland on slavery; broadsides of a U.S. pension agency; and announcement and program of the 29th annual session of the Farmers' National Congress, Raleigh, 1909.

There are also many 19th century manuscript volumes - daybooks, ledgers, and account books - containing financial records of the general mercantile establishments of John W. Boyd and Benjamin R. Boyd; Hezekiah Hedges; Henry J. Seibert; and of William L. Seibert.

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James Olin Hobbs, Sr. papers, 1806-1916 5.8 Linear Feet — 655 Items

Correspondence, mercantile records, account books, bills and receipts, and voting registration certificates of Hobbs, his son James Olin Hobbs, Jr., businessmen of Alleghany and Augusta counties, Va., and the Hobbs family. Subjects include economic conditions in western Virginia, 1835-1875, and conditions in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, during the early Reconstruction period.

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James Thomas papers, 1850-1879 12 Linear Feet — 23 boxes (14,008 items)

This collection contains business and personal correspondence, orders, price bulletins, and other papers, relating to the tobacco business of James Thomas, the tobacco industry in general, and the economic life of Virginia (1850s). Includes information on Thomas' assistance to the Virginia Baptist Seminary (now the University of Richmond). Correspondents and persons mentioned include J. L. M. Curry, George Frederick Holmes, and Basil Manly.

This collection consists principally of the apparently complete business papers and records, 1850-1863, of James Thomas, Jr. (1806-1882), one of the largest of antebellum tobacco manufacturers. In addition to an extensive business correspondence, numerous orders for tobacco from Maine, Massachusetts, Louisiana, Georgia, the Netherlands, England, and Australia are included, as well as prices current bulletins from firms throughout the world. The collection not only gives a detailed history of Thomas's enterprises, but affords much information on the tobacco industry in general and on other phases of the economic life of Virginia in the 1850s. Some of Thomas's private correspondence is also in the collection, including an occasional letter from such men as J. L. M. Curry and George Frederick Holmes. Some information is given on Thomas's aid to Basil Manly in his work with the Virginia Baptist Seminary (later the Univesity of Richmond), and on his financial assistance, which made it possible for the institution to remain open after the Civil War.