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Letters, reports, certificates of appointment, receipts, loans, and other documents pertaining to the Civil War and to the Lee family (accession#2000-353), and collected by Alfred and Elizabeth Brand. The Civil War Papers Series includes battle reports from Bull Run (1861), Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg; Confederate Army General Orders Nos. 9, 64, and 18; letters detailing the operation of the Confederate Army, outcomes of battles, and Confederate opinions about the Civil War and specific officers. Includes a broadside, "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!;" a transcription of an interview with Jefferson Davis by newspaper writer Augustus C. Buell (1876); a draft of the poem "The Conquered Banner" by the Rev. Abram J. Ryan (1865); two engravings (of Grant and Sherman); John H. Miller and M. French's obligation and oath of allegiance to Virginia and to the Confederate States of America (1862); and J. C. Winsmith's oath of allegiance to the USA and pardon from Andrew Johnson and William H. Seward (1865).

Writers and correspondents in this Series are primarily from Virginia (especially Berkeley County) and Kentucky. Prominent individuals include Pierre Gustave Tonte Beauregard, Braxton Bragg, David Holmes Conrad, Samuel Cooper, Samuel Wylie Crawford, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, J. E. Johnson, I. Nadenbousch, Daniel Ruggles, William T. Sherman, and Edwin M. Stanton.

The Lee Family Papers Series comprises primarily Colonial-era governmental and financial documents pertaining to Francis Lightfoot Lee, "Henry Light Horse Harry" Lee, and Richard Henry Lee, Sr. Documents pertain to slaves; maps and surveys of leased land; and loan indentures. Includes certificates appointing Francis Lightfoot Lee as Justice of the Peace (1757-1768); and a letter from Richard Henry Lee, Sr., to Henry Lee regarding the colonists' agitation for freedom (1770). Ante-bellum and Civil War documents in the Lee family papers include loan indentures; a bill of sale for cotton to the Confederate government; two cartes-de-visite (of Robert E. Lee); letters written by Richard Henry Lee, Jr., discussing the sale of his sister's slaves; and a letter from Robert Edward Lee to Samuel Cooper regarding poorly executed military orders (1865). Several documents throughout the collection include the original rare manuscripts dealer's description.

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Bradley T. Johnson papers, 1851-1909 2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes (922 items)

Bradley T. Johnson was a Confederate officer, lawyer, and politician, born in Frederick (Frederick Co.), Maryland who later settled in Virginia after the Civil War. The collection includes correspondence, personal accounts, Civil War reminiscences of campaigns in several states, a memoir of the 1st Maryland Regiment, C.S.A., a muster roll of the 21st Virginia, Company B, records of a Confederate prison hospital, and an incomplete diary of a trip to Cuba as correspondent during the Spanish-American War. Included also are a series of letters from Wade Hampton and from Joseph E. Johnston. Other correspondents include Henry Adams, James Cardinal Gibbons, and Henry Cabot Lodge along with an anonymous April-Dec., 1846 diary, identified with Isaac R. Watkins, law student in Richmond, Va. and son of prosperous Charlotte County family.

Correspondence, personal accounts, Civil War reminiscences of campaigns in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania of Bradley T. Johnson, a Confederate officer, lawyer, and politician, born in Frederick (Frederick Co.), Md. who later settled in Virginia after the Civil War. The collection also includes a memoir of the 1st Maryland Regiment, C.S.A., a muster roll of the 21st Virginia, Company B, records of a Confederate prison hospital, and an incomplete diary of a trip to Cuba as correspondent during the Spanish-American War. It includes a series of letters from Wade Hampton and from Joseph E. Johnston. Other correspondents include Henry Adams, James Cardinal Gibbons, and Henry Cabot Lodge.

Collection also Includes anonymous April-Dec., 1846 diary, identified with Isaac R. Watkins, a law student in Richmond, Va. and son of a prosperous Charlotte County family.

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Bullock family papers, 1784-1940s and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — Approximately 1200 items — Approximately 1200 items

Papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC. The bulk is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; slaves and tenants (including some lists of slave names); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; religious life; the Spanish-American War; and the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston and the siege of Petersburg. Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876.

Collection houses the papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC.

The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; slaves and tenants (including some lists of slave names); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; and religious life. Of interest are 46 letters relating to the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston in 1862 and the siege of Petersburg in late 1864. A few letters are send from Johnson Island, Ohio, and a few give some details on the final months of the war in North Carolina.

Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Also included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876, and assorted other papers, including a list of about 40 slave names from 1857, and medical receipts and accounts.

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Charles Wesley Andrews papers, 1808-1901 6 Linear Feet — 14 boxes — 3,640 Items

Protestant Episcopal clergyman, Shepherdstown, W. Va. Correspondence, journal (in letter form) of travels in Europe and the Near East in the 1840s, and other papers relating to church affairs, to the American Colonization Society, to conditions in Virginia before, during, and after the Civil War, and to such schools as the Episcopal High School and the Theological Seminary at Alexandria, Va., Woodberry Forest School, Orange, Va., Washington College (now Washington and Lee), Va., Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, and others. Includes genealogical material on the Meade, Page, Custis, Fitzhugh, Robinson, Mines, and Boteler familes of Virginia.

Correspondence, journal (in letter form) of travels in Europe and the Near East in the 1840s, and other papers relating to church affairs, to the American Colonization Society, to conditions in Virginia before, during, and after the Civil War, and to such schools as the Episcopal High School and the Theological Seminary at Alexandria, Va., Woodberry Forest School, Orange, Va., Washington College (now Washington and Lee), Va., Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, and others. Includes genealogical material on the Meade, Page, Custis, Fitzhugh, Robinson, Mines, and Boteler familes of Virginia.

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The Confederate States of America (CSA) was formed in 1861 by eleven states in the southern United States that declared secession from the U.S. The CSA collapsed in 1865 after its defeat in the American Civil War by Union forces. Collection was assembled from various sources and includes a variety of materials originating from administrative bodies within the Confederate States of America, including the Army, Executive Department, Congress, state governments and agencies, and the Navy. In addition to official records, the collection also includes some personal correspondence and miscellany.

The Confederate States of America Collection was assembled from various sources and includes a variety of materials originating from administrative bodies within the Confederate States of America, including the Army, Executive Department, Congress, state governments and agencies, and the Navy. In addition to official records, the collection also includes some personal correspondence and miscellany.

The CSA Congress division contains miscellaneous papers as well as original and typed copies of acts and statutes of the CSA Congress.

The Executive Department papers contain records of various offices of the Cabinet with the respective bureaus under each office, including the Justice Department, Navy Department, Post Office Department, State Department, Treasury Department, and War Department.

Also included are records of various Army units including: Army of Mississippi, Army of Tennessee, Army of Northern Virginia, Department of South Carolina and Georgia, Wheeler's Calvary, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Another group of Army related records is organized by record type and includes hospital records, military telegrams, and Quartermaster records, among others.

State government records exist for Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, and state agency records exist for North Carolina and Georgia and are divided into two groups: the Court Records for the Pamlico District of North Carolina, and the poor relief and claims papers of North Carolina and Georgia.

Miscellany includes soldiers' letters, prison papers, oaths of allegiance, sketch maps, and autographs, as well as a small number of volumes and ledgers.

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Correspondence, legal papers, and financial records concerning Edmund Jennings Lee’s law practice, estate settlements, and personal family matters. Subjects include Confederate refugees in Canada, the formation of West Virginia as a state, conditions of Virginia in 1865, and bridge and turnpike construction and management. Includes family writings and diary entries from Henrietta Bedinger Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee III, and Edwin Gray Lee. Also includes bills, receipts, and financial ledgers from Edmund Jennings Lee’s law practice.

The Edmund Jennings Lee II Papers have been divided into four series: Correspondence, Personal Files, Legal Papers, and Financial Records. The majority of materials concern Lee’s legal practice and business interests in Shepherdstown, WV. Materials include letters between Lee and his brothers, Charles Henry Lee, Richard Henry Lee, and Cassius Francis Lee; letters concerning family matters; legal briefs, documents, land surveys, bill, receipts, and financial ledgers from Lee’s legal practice; and miscellaneous family papers and writings, including diaries from Henrietta Bedinger Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee III, and Edwin Gray Lee.

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Lawyer, and Governor of Virginia, from Winchester (Frederick Co.), Virginia. Papers contain letters from Holliday while a student at Yale University, 1846; papers relating to the 33rd Virginia Regiment, which Holliday raised and commanded during the Civil War; letters concerning the International Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876, at which Holliday served as a commissioner from Virginia; and letters and papers relating to Holliday's election as governor in 1877; and letters from his term as governor, for the most part dealing with routine political and administrative matters. Also includes printed matter and scrapbooks of clippings and letter books created while Holliday was a student at Yale and at the University of Virginia, 1845-1849, and as governor of Virginia, 1878-1879; and four record books concerning Holliday's legal work.

The papers of Frederick William Mackey Holliday contain letters from Holliday while a student at Yale University, 1846; papers relating to the 33rd Virginia Regiment, which Holliday raised and commanded during the Civil War; letters concerning the International Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876, at which Holliday served as a commissioner from Virginia; and letters and papers relating to Holliday's election as governor of Virginia in 1877 and letters from his term as governor, for the most part dealing with routine political and administrative matters.

Printed material includes The Struggles, Perils and Hopes of the Negroes in the United States, a pamphlet by Reverend C. Clifton Penick, 1893; a typed copy of "The Virginia Debt in Politics," by William L. Royall, published in 1897 as History of the Virginia debt controversy; and broadsides, campaign literature, and other political material.

Volumes include ten scrapbooks of clippings; letter books of Holliday as a student at Yale and the University of Virginia, 1845-1849, and as governor of Virginia, 1878-1879; and four record books concerning Holliday's legal work.

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George B. Harrison papers, 1821-1924 18 Linear Feet — 13,488 Items

Lawyer, of Clarke Co., Va. Correspondence, daybooks, and family, business, and other papers. The bulk of the collection consists of cancelled checks, bills and receipts, legal papers, newspaper clippings, and advertisements. The papers deal with Civil War destruction in Virginia, social life in Virginia after the war, American interest in Cuba (1869-1870), agriculture and land in Florida (1880s), social, political, and economic activities in Clarke Co., the genealogy of the Harrison family, and other matters. Correspondents include Thomas R. Dew and Harry F. Byrd.

Correspondence, daybooks, and family, business, and other papers. The bulk of the collection consists of cancelled checks, bills and receipts, legal papers, newspaper clippings, and advertisements. Topics include Civil War destruction in Virginia, social life in Virginia after the war, American interest in Cuba (1869-1870), agriculture and land in Florida (1880s), social, political, and economic activities in Clarke Co., the genealogy of the Harrison family, and other matters. Correspondents include Thomas R. Dew and Harry F. Byrd.

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George Winfield was a resident of New Market, Virginia. Collection includes two volumes--an account book and a notebook containing writings, memoranda, accounts, and time tracking for farmhands. The notebook also contains a two-page description of the "Shenandoah Bridge Affair", which involved Ashby's cavalry (Confederate) and Chew's battery (Confederate).

Collection includes two volumes--an account book and a notebook containing writings, memoranda, accounts, and time tracking for farmhands. The notebook also contains a two-page description of the "Shenandoah Bridge Affair", which involved Ashby's cavalry (Confederate) and Chew's battery (Confederate).

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James King Wilkerson papers, 1820-1929 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 896 Items

Confederate soldier, member of the 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. K; and farmer, from Granville County, N.C. The papers of James King Wilkerson and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson and Luther Wilkerson, James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter. The Civil War letters, written by James Wilkerson to his family, contain references to the C.S.S. Virginia, detailed descriptions of marches, comments on crop conditions as he moved from place to place, his Civil War service around Petersburg, Virginia, late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865.

The papers of James King Wilkerson (1842-1919) and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks belonging to James when he was 16 and 17, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson (1877-1955) and Luther Wilkerson (1874-1942), James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter.

The Civil War letters were all or nearly all written by James Wilkerson, who served in the Confederate Army, 55th North Carolina Regiment, Company K, from Aug. 1861 through spring of 1865. His letters to his family are significant for their references to the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (the former U.S.S. Merrimac); detailed descriptions of marches, including references to orders dealing with men who couldn't keep up or fell during the march; comments on the condition of crops as he moved to different locales; and references to his Civil War service around Petersburg, Va. late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865. The collection is rounded out by a copy of The Spirit of Prayer (Nathaniel Vincent, 1840), owned by James K. Wilkerson during the Civil War.