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The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Glenn Scarboro photographs, 1962-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 168 items — 168 items

This collection of 166 black-and-white inkjet 13x19 inch photographs by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, the photographer's hometown, while other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York. The street scenes in Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents, small businesses, houses, and churches; rural themes include horse shows. county fairs, and country landscapes. There is also a series of family portraits taken in the 1960s. Collection includes one handmade photobook by Scarboro containing eleven photographs and handwritten text. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This collection of 166 13x19 inch black-and-white inkjet prints by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, a small town with industries linked to tobacco, railroads, and textile mills, and the artist's hometown. Other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York.

The street scenes of Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents of all ages and backgrounds, chiefly from the 1960s; small businesses; people and their cars; house exteriors and interiors; churches; and outdoor advertising and logos. One photograph is of the house of free black craftsman Thomas Day, in Milton, NC.

Rural themes include portraits of country people, barns and tobacco warehouses, livestock, and rural landscapes, with a large series of images particular focused on southern Virginia horse shows and county fairs.

There are no photographs of the social protests and political activities that took place in small towns such as Danville at that time, but the street photographs do speak to social culture and conditions in southern Virginia during the 1960s, and some, as the photographer notes, allude to the sense of social disruption and alienation in small-town Southern society.

The series ends with a series of portraits, chiefly of Scarboro and his immediate family, taken in the 1960s. One portrait of Scarboro in New York City was taken by photographer, instructor, and friend Emmet Gowin.

The collection also includes a 15-page handmade artist's book by Scarboro containing eleven black-and-white photographs taken in 1963 and printed from original negatives in 1965. The book was assembled in 1972 and is number six of a limited edition of seven, and features a unique cover with a pen-and-ink drawing.

A print inventory created by the photographer contains additional biographical narrative and commentary, and is available in the first box. The photographs are arranged in original order as received.

From the artist's statement: "There was a photograph in The Family of Man made by Jerry Cooke (originally published in Life magazine) of a woman sitting quite forlorn on a bench in a very dark place that gave no clues as to time, place, person or situation...which are the four psychiatric attributes of reality. She was alone. The quote under the photograph read, 'I am alone with the beating of my heart.' (Lui Chi) Making photographs in the streets of my hometown in the 60/70s calmed the beating of my unsettled heart and gave a face to the feelings of social alienation endemic to that time. Danville streets were the places of my earliest identity. In the process of becoming a close observer of ordinary life…I had become an artist.

Anxiety is always at the edge of identity."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.