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Adeline Burr Davis Green papers, 1796-1956 5 Linear Feet — 1551 Items

Married first to David Davis, lawyer, Supreme Court Justice, and U.S. Senator from Illinois, and then to Wharton Jackson Green, agriculturist and U.S. Representative from North Carolina; resident of Fayetteville, N.C. Personal and family correspondence. Includes journal of and letters, 1851-1853, from brother James M. Burr to his wife describing his life in California during the Gold Rush; Civil War letters to Adeline from her cousin (and later second husband), Wharton Jackson Green, while a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters, 1882-1885, from first husband David Davis describing daily proceedings in the Senate, social functions in Washington, D.C., and notable persons; letters from friends of Davis concerning personal and political matters; letters, 1906-1928, from Jessica Randolph Smith and others pertaining to the United Daughters of the Confederacy; and letters, 1911-1931, from cousin James Henry Rice, Jr., ornithologist, naturalist, editor, and literary figure, discussing politics, conservation, South Carolina culture, world affairs, especially relative to Germany and Russia, his rice plantations, and the League of Nations.

Papers of Adeline E. (Burr) Davis Green (1843-1931) include letters, 1851-1853, from James M. Burr, brother of Adeline (Burr) Davis Green, to his wife describing his life in California searching for gold; James Burr's journal entitled "Journal of a Cruise to California and the Diggins" ; Civil War letters from her second husband and cousin, Wharton Jackson Green (1831-1910), later agriculturist and U.S. congressman, while a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters, 1882-1885, from her first husband, David Davis (1815-1886), jurist and U. S. senator, describing daily proceedings in the senate, social functions in Washington, D.C., and notable persons; letters from friends of Davis concerning personal and political matters; letters, 1906-1928, from Jessica Randolph Smith and others pertaining to the Daughters of the Confederacy; and letters, 1911-1931, from James Henry Rice, Jr. (1868-1935), ornithologist, naturalist, editor, and literary figure, discussing politics, conservation, South Carolina culture, world affairs, especially relative to Germany and Russia, his rice plantations, and the League of Nations.

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C. C. Clay papers, 1811-1925 20 Linear Feet — 8,568 Items

Clement Claiborne Clay (1816-1882) was a lawyer, U. S. Senator, Confederate diplomat, and planter from Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. He was married to Virginia Carolina (Tunstall) Clay (1825-1915). His father, Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866) was a U.S. Congressman and Governor of Alabama. Collection includes personal, business, and political correspondence, accounts, diaries, memoranda, college notes, scrapbooks, and clippings of Clement Claiborne Clay, and of his father, Clement Comer Clay; his mother, Susanna Claiborne Withers Clay; his wife, Virginia Caroline Tunstall Clay; and brothers, Hugh Lawson Clay and John Withers Clay. Letters deal with family matters, including Alabama and Washington, D.C., social life, education, the management of cotton plantations, civic affairs in Huntsville; state and national politics and elections; Clay Sr.'s governorship; Clay Jr.'s service in both the U.S. and Confederate senates; ante-bellum politics; the organization of the Confederacy; Reconstruction politics, including Clay Jr.'s arrest, imprisonment, and his wife's efforts to obtain his release; Clay Jr.'s efforts to retrieve his property and re-establish farming operations, and to settle his father's estate; Virginia Clay's dissatisfaction with Reconstruction period social life, her tour of Europe, 1884-1885, and her efforts to operate the plantation after her husband's death.

Personal, business, and political correspondence, accounts, diaries, memoranda, college notes, scrapbooks, and clippings of Clement Claiborne Clay (1816-1882), lawyer, U.S. senator, Confederate diplomat, and planter; of his father, Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866), lawyer, planter, U.S. congressman and senator, and governor of Alabama; of his mother, Susanna Claiborne (Withers) Clay (1798-1866); of his wife, Virginia Caroline (Tunstall) Clay (1825-1915), who wrote A Bell of the Fifties: Memoirs of Mrs. Clay, of Alabama, covering Social and Political Life in Washington and the South, 1853-1866: Put into Narrative Form by Ada Sterling (New York: Doubleday, 1904); and of his brothers, Hugh Lawson Clay and John Withers Clay, and of their wives.

Letters deal with family matters, including education of the elder Clay's three sons at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; management of two or more cotton plantations and approximately fifty slaves; civic affairs in Huntsville; state politics, 1819-1860; Democratic and Whig party alignments, rivalries, and disputes; presidential elections, especially in 1844, 1852, and 1856; Clement Comer Clay's governorship, 1835-1837. the Creek War, 1836; the panic of 1837, Clement Claiborne Clay's election as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1853 and his reselection in 1857. Other political matters referred to include the Compromise of 1850; Kansas-Nebraska difficulty; break with Stephen A. Douglas; Democratic Convention of 1860; secession; and organization of the Confederate government. Personal letters refer to social life in Alabama and in Washington, D.C.; visits to springs and health resorts; and Clement Claiborne Clay's travels for his health through Florida, 1851, and later to Arkansas and Minnesota.

Subjects of the Civil War years include Clement Claiborne Clay's political activities in the Confederate States Senate; his relations with Jefferson Davis; Federal raids on and occupation of Huntsville, consequent disruption of civilian life, and demoralization of slaves; J. W. Clay's publication of the Huntsville Democrat in various towns; Clay's defeat in the election of 1863 for the Confederate Senate; his and other agents' work in Canada, assisting in the return of escaped Confederate prisoners to Confederate territory; plots of a general revolt in the Northwestern states designed to join these states to the Confederacy; the Democratic Convention of 1864; Horace Greeley's efforts for peace, 1864; plans and execution of the Confederate raid on St. Albans, Vermont, 1864; Clay's return from Canada, and the final days of the Confederacy.

Material relating to the aftermath of the Civil War concerns accusations against Clay for complicity in Lincoln's assassination, Clay's surrender to Federal authorities, his imprisonment at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, and the efforts of Virginia (Tunstall) Clay to obtain her husband's release. Papers for the period 1866-1915 generally pertain to personal matters, principally Clay's poverty, his attempts to retrieve his confiscated property, the settlement of his father's estate, efforts to re-establish farming operations, and his years in the insurance business, 1871-1873, with Jefferson Davis; and Virginia (Tunstall) Clay's dissatisfaction with a restricted social life, her tour of Europe, 1884-1885, and her efforts in later years to operate the plantation. There are occasional references to political affairs.

The volumes consist of an executor's book of the estate of C. C. Clay, Sr., 1866-1869; letter books, 1864-1865; letterpress copy covering insurance business; memorandum books, 1853-1864, containing a mailing list of constituents and other notations; notebook, 1835-1841, containing college lecture notes; receipt books; legal fee book, 1814-1815; scrapbooks, ca. 1848-1903, one of which contains plantation accounts, 1870-1873, and minutes of the Madison County Bible Society, 1820-1830; and the diaries and scrapbooks, 1859-1905, of Virginia (Tunstall) Clay.

Correspondents include Jeremiah S. Black, E. C. Bullock, C. C. Clay, Sr., C. C. Clay, Jr., David Clopton [Virginia (Tunstall) Clay's second husband], W. W. Corcoran, J. L. M. Curry, Jefferson Davis, Varina Davis, Benjamin Fitzpatrick, U. S. Grant, Andrew Johnson, L. Q. C. Lamar, Clifford Anderson Lanier, Sidney Lanier, Stephen R. Mallory, Nelson A. Miles, James K. Polk, John H. Reagan, R. B. Rhett, E. S. Shorter, Leroy P. Walker, Louis T. Wigfall, and William L. Yancey.

Description above taken from Guide to Cataloged Collections in the Manuscripts Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980)

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Col. David S. Wilson (1825-1881), originally from Ohio, was a lawyer and editor in Dubuque, Iowa. He served with the Sixth Cavalry of Iowa from 1862-1864 and also practiced law in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., during the 1860s and 1870s. He was appointed circuit judge and district judge in Dubuque and served until 1878. He and his wife, Henrietta, had four children: Henry, Gertrude, John, and David. The family's papers consists largely of personal correspondence between D.S. and Henrietta, as well as a significant amount of correspondence between the couple and their children. Also included in the collection are a selection of D.S. Wilson's legal and political materials, such as a diary from his 1860 term in the Iowa General Assembly, miscellaneous court case briefings, and some materials from his work as an attorney for the New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company.

The Col. David S. Wilson Family Papers document the activities of Col. David S. Wilson and his family of Dubuque, Iowa, from the mid-1850s through the early 1870s. The majority of the collection consists of the family’s correspondence. David and his wife, Henrietta, wrote frequent letters during his many absences from Dubuque; both parties are well-represented in the family's papers. Topics tended to center on the family's finances, personal and family news, and local events. Col. D.S. Wilson's military service during the 1860s was only mentioned in passing, as it related to the family's travels or finances. Later letters from D.S. Wilson's time in San Francisco discuss court cases and business news, and include details on family disputes between David and his brother Samuel M. Wilson, also a lawyer. D.S. Wilson repeatedly wrote about his unhappiness at being separated from his family in San Francisco. He finally returned to Dubuque to practice law there and in Washington, D.C.

Other major sources of correspondence are the couple's four children, particularly Henry (called "Harry") and Gertrude (called "Gertie") Wilson, who spent time at Kenyon College in Ohio and Brooke Hall in Pennsylvania. Henry and Gertrude regularly wrote home to their parents and included news about their activities and classmates. Nearly all of the collection's letters from 1873 and 1874 are directed to Gertie, who was actively courted by several men. Gertrude's suitors between 1870 and 1874 include James S. Donnell (Pittsburgh), John H. Rutherford (Cincinatti), Alonzo E. Wood (Dubuque), James H. Park, Charles Plunkett, and George Brock (Chicago); she eventually married Brock on March 2, 1874. The Wilsons' third child, John, appears to have attended school in Dubuque; letters between him and his classmates are also present in the collection and include many secret messages, codes, and nicknames. "Johnnie" was regularly referred to as the Champion Flirt of Iowa. Only a few letters remain for the youngest son, David Jr., nicknamed "Dada."

The collection includes interesting political and legal documents. A diary kept by Wilson in 1860 records his activities as a state representative in the Iowa General Assembly. Also present are miscellaneous materials from some of D.S. Wilson's court cases, including several from the U.S. District Court of Southern California relating to the case McGarrahan vs. the New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company. Wilson's materials also contain a cipher that appears to relate to that case, including code names for various parties and terms. There is also a 1855 General Land Office certificate for D.S. Wilson, signed by President Franklin Pierce.

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Isabelle Perkinson Williamson papers, 1827-1930, bulk 1909-1930 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — approximately 2,520 items

Correspondence and other items of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. There are also letters from and items belonging to Lee H. Williamson. Topics include: life in Charlottesville, Virginia; students of the University; Edwin A. Alderman, University president; work in the Navy Department from 1913-1917; the early moving picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Includes descriptions of the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., Europe during 1909 and 1910, Virginia, the Panama Canal Zone, Rancagua, Chile, and Puerto Rico. Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers; food cards; and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France. The collection also contains information on early moving pictures; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, and greeting cards round out the collection.

Collection comprises papers of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. Included are many letters to Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson from former students of the University of Virginia who had patronized her boardinghouse in Charlottesville, Virginia, letters from Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson to her daughter describing life in Charlottesville, and commenting on Edwin A. Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, and many notes and bills reflecting frequent financial difficulties. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

Many of the letters describe travels: letters from Isabelle P. Williamson to her mother were sent while attending the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., while on a tour of Europe during 1909 and 1910, while visiting in Virginia and in the Panama Canal Zone, while working in the Navy Department in Washington, 1913-1917, and, after her marriage in 1917, while living near Rancagua, Chile, and in Puerto Rico with her husband. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. Williamson and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

The collection also contains information on the early motion picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression.

Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers, food cards, and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France.

Sixty-nine photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, greeting cards, and Lee Williamson's WWI military identification card round out the collection.

Much more information on the collection's contents, written up in 1941, can be found in the Rubenstein Library cardfile catalog; please consult with Research Services staff.

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The Riggs family lived in Washington, D.C. George Washington Riggs was the founder of Riggs and Company and the Riggs National Bank. The collection contains correspondence, legal papers, financial papers, pictures, and printed material of the Riggs family of Washington, D.C. Correspondence relates to the interest of George Washington Riggs, founder of Riggs and Company and of the Riggs National Bank, in collecting art objects, currency, and paintings, and to his investments in Washington real estate and to the various investments of his children and grandchildren. Legal papers relate principally to the settlement of the estates of various members of the family. Financial papers relate chiefly to Alice and Jane Riggs, daughters of G. W. Riggs, and a few bills of exchange. Printed materials include inaugural souvenirs representing the Cleveland through the Coolidge administrations. Among the pictures are photographs of the Riggs sisters, and autographed photographs belonging to G. W. Riggs.

This collection contains correspondence, legal papers, financial papers, pictures, and printed material of the Riggs family. Correspondence pertains to the interest of George Washington Riggs (1813-1881), founder of Riggs and Company and of the Riggs National Bank, Washington, D.C., in collecting art objects, currency, and paintings, and to his investments in Washington real estate; the investments of his daughters, Jane Riggs (1853-1930) and Alice Riggs, in various companies; the settlement of the share of the estate of Katherine Shedden (Riggs) de Geofroy (d. 1881) belonging to her sons, George de Geofroy and Antoine de Geofroy; business correspondence between Jane Riggs and the children of Cecilia (Riggs) and Henry Howard, especially George Howard; and the stranding of Jane Riggs in Germany at the outbreak of World War I.

Legal papers, relating principally to the settlement of the estates of various members of the Riggs family, include estate papers of Elisha Riggs (1779-1853); will of George Washington Riggs, records of the division of the estate, and an accounting of the executor, Lawrason Riggs (1814-1888), brother of George Washington Riggs; papers pertaining to the lawsuit of Francis B. Riggs, William C. Riggs, and Mary G. Riggs, of the family of Elisha Riggs, Jr., against the remaining members of families of the children of Elisha Riggs, Sr., containing a listing of the members of the Riggs family and several wills; inventory of the estate of Thomas Lawrason Riggs, 1888; inventory of the estate of Jane Riggs, 1930-1931; guardianship papers for George de Geofroy and Antoine de Geofroy, 1893-1894; and title to a real estate lot in Washington, D.C., a legal matter involving former President Franklin Pierce.

Financial papers are chiefly the statements of Alice and Jane Riggs, and a few bills of exchange relating to the commercial transactions of George Peabody and his partner, Elisha Riggs. Printed materials include pamphlets on the suit of Elisha Francis Riggs (d. 1936) against Mary McMullen, companion of Jane Riggs, for possession of family treasures; and invitations and inaugural souvenirs from the White House representing the Cleveland through the Coolidge administrations. Among the pictures are photographs of the Riggs sisters, and autographed photographs belonging to George Washington Riggs, including those of the British commissioners who settled the Alabama claims in 1871.