Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Fred Chappell papers, 1944-2021 and undated

164.5 Linear Feet — 5.9 Gigabytes

The fully processed portion of the Fred Chappell Papers spans the dates 1960-1997, with the bulk being dated after 1970. There are several additions covering the years 1998 through 2015. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Chappell and other authors; printed material (primarily serials containing stories, poems, and articles by Chappell but also clippings); legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; and other material. Documents relate to Chappell's personal life and career, both as a student and writer at Duke University, where he studied under well-known creative writing teacher William Blackburn, and as a writer and professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNC-G). The collection documents the entire length and breadth of Chappell's multifaceted career, beginning with the years just after he completed his undergraduate studies at Duke and started his first novel at the urging of Hiram Haydn, an editor to whom Blackburn had introduced him. Letters, manuscripts, and notebooks provide insight into Chappell's developing literary career, his academic activities at UNC-G, and his growing involvement with a large network of writers, including a number of his former students. Many prominent American authors, especially Southern ones, are represented in the collection. Among the most frequent correspondents are Kelly Cherry, Grace DiSanto, George Garrett, Marianne Gingher, Dana Gioia, Donald Hall, Heather Ross Miller, Robert Morgan, Eve Shelnutt, and Dabney Stuart. Notebooks, manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, and printed material document the development of Chappell's career across all the genres in which he writes. Supporting material in non-print media, including photographs and audio and video cassettes of readings, document public aspects of his career.

The Correspondence Series, arranged chronologically in Incoming and Outgoing subseries, discloses the range of Chappell's interests and activities in the literary community. The letters not only provide a portrait of his development as a poet and novelist but also demonstrate his active roles in supporting the careers of other writers and promoting the literary community. These latter activities are documented by his numerous affirmative responses to a broad range of requests to read drafts of works-in-progress, write recommendations for other writers for grants and awards, write reviews and provide blurbs for new publications, serve as the judge of contests, speak at conferences and workshops, and serve in various advisory and editorial capacities for literary journals. The correspondence also provides much information about his teaching career and his legacy of students who develop successful careers of their own, such as Cherry, Miller, Morgan, and Shelnutt. The bulk of the outgoing correspondence dates to 1990 or after, when, at the request of the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Chappell began retaining copies of all outgoing correspondence.

The Writings by Chappell Series is divided into subseries by genres with the exception of one subseries based on format, the Notebooks Subseries. Since Chappell writes with relatively few hand corrections on any particular stage of his work, the development of an individual work is often apparent only by comparing various complete drafts in manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs. The notebooks are particularly valuable in this regard, providing what often appear to be the earliest versions of works. The notebooks also indicate the facility with which Chappell moves from one genre to another, as most of them are not devoted to a single work or genre but rather include poems, stories, novel fragments, essays, reviews, translations, and drafts of correspondence following one after the other. This versatility is further reflected by the Printed Materials Series, which contains extensive serials with Chappell's publications in multiple genres, especially fiction, poetry, and reviews. At the end of this series, the Clippings Subseries documents his public and critical reception with copies of reviews and essays about his work and publicity about it.

The Miscellaneous Series contains a variety of flyers, leaflets, newsletters, and examples of fan mail that further demonstrate his literary career. Prominent here are such items as the proofs for a 1990 symposium about his poetry and newsletters of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. It also contains two small subseries of audio and video cassettes of readings, interviews, and work by other authors.

The Writings by Others Series contains manuscripts from well-known contemporary writers, ex-students, and aspiring writers seeking advice. Chappell's reactions to the manuscripts are written on many of them, often as the first draft of a letter or requested recommendation. Most writers are represented by only one or two items, but Cherry and Shelnutt are both represented by more than a dozen pieces that, together with their frequent correspondence, outline the development of their respective careers.

Later additions to the collection include incoming and outgoing correspondence, drafts and writings of Chappell's poetry, honors and awards, and printed materials and publications featuring Chappell or his work. Most accessions include bound volumes as well as writings and manuscripts by other authors or poets. There are also some oversize materials, audiovisual materials, clippings, and photographs. These additions have been loosely sorted but have not been incorporated physically or intellectually into the originally processed collection. Please consult Research Services with questions about using these materials.

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Incoming Correspondence Subseries, 1960-1997 and undated

Includes letters from friends, family members, writers, teachers, students, editors, publishers, and readers of Chappell's works. Letters are arranged chronologically with undated letters at the end. Some letters include short writings as attachments. Longer writings such as drafts of entire books, complete issues of serials, and so on appear in the Writings by Others Series. Chappell frequently uses the backs of letters, envelopes, or attachments to write drafts of various material: responses to the letter at hand, poems, story fragments, translations, and autobiographical statements. A chronological list of these items appears following the box list for this subseries.

James Van Der Zee photographs, circa 1908-1935

.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 42 photographic prints
Collection comprises 42 photographs taken by James Van Der Zee, known for his portraits and documentation of daily life in Harlem, N.Y., especially during the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). There are views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, as well as fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations. Subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats, a soldier, a female impersonator, a funerary portrait of a man in an open casket, Black Hebrews, Black Cross nurses, Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade, entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia, boxer Jack Johnson, and entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing a violin, circa 1930. An early portrait of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter was taken around 1908, in Lenox, Massachusetts, his birthplace. Average print size is roughly 10 3/4 x 12 inches. Almost all are exhibit prints created mostly in the 1980s from original negatives. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises forty gelatin silver exhibit prints and two vintage prints of images taken by photographer James Van Der Zee, known for his portraits and documentation of daily life in Harlem, N.Y., especially during the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). There are views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, as well as fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing the violin, circa 1930. Other subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats; a 1923 soldier; the New York Black Giants baseball team; a female impersonator; a man in an open funeral casket with a superimposed poem extolling fatherhood; a group of African American Hebrews in front of the Moorish Zionist Temple; Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade; a Garveyite with his son; entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia in their "Dark Tower" salon with a large group of friends; boxer Jack Johnson; and a double exposure portrait of entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson.

Prints are arranged in chronological order. The earliest images, from 1908, are of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter, probably taken in Lenox, Massachusetts, Van Der Zee's birthplace, and a blacksmith, probably taken in Virginia, where Van der Zee spent some time before moving to New York.

The exhibit prints were created from original negatives chiefly from 1981-1983, under the supervision of James Van Der Zee until his passing in 1983. Others were printed around 1987 by his widow Donna Mussenden Van Der Zee. All prints bear titles, dates, edition information, and copyright on verso. Most are from runs of 250 limited edition prints created for various exhibits. Some are signed by the photographer.

The majority of the prints measure 10 x 12 inches (sheet dimensions); image sizes range from 10 1/8 x 8 to 10 x 2 5/8 inches.

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Black Cross Nurses, 1924 Image dimensions: 5 5/8 x 9 5/8 inches; Sheet dimensions: 8 x 10 inches

Box 1, Image RL.11758-P-0001

Alternate title from an online image: "Black Cross Nurses at UNIA Parade Honoring Marcus Garvey." UNIA was the United Negro Improvement Association, led by Black nationalist Marcus Garvey. Recto bears editing marks; verso carries GGG Studio stamp at 272 Lenox Avenue, indicating the print may have been created afer 1930.

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Father, 1944 Image dimensions: 7 7/8 x 10 inches; Sheet dimensions: 7 7/8 x 10 inches

Box 1, Image RL.11758-P-0002

Alternate title from an online image: "Father's Farewell." Image of man in open casket surrounded by flowers, with superimposed narrative extolling fatherhood. Verso bears the GGG Studio stamp at 272 Lenox Avenue.

Marcia M. Mathews papers and photographs, 1833-1976, bulk 1939-1976

3.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Marcia M. Mathews (1904-1990) was an art historian and author residing in Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises materials relating to two research projects conducted by Mathews: one on Roger Fenton, lawyer and early English photographer; and a later project on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. The Fenton series includes letters (1940s-1950s) from Fenton descendants, many of which comment on the aftermath of the war; images of the family home, Crimble Hall in Rochdale, England; photographs of Fenton and his family (1860s); and modern copies of his own photographs (1850s). The Barthé papers consist of a draft biography by Mathews, and 134 photographs of his sculptures and other artwork, as well as early portraits of Barthé and his family, and were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture. Although Barthé had relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality. The collection also includes a large scrapbook for the year 1939 containing U.S. news stories and articles about the war and on Fascism in the U.S.

The papers of author and art historian Marcia M. Mathews comprise materials chiefly relating to two research projects: Mathew's search for material on Roger Fenton, a mid-19th century lawyer and early photographer; and an unpublished typescript and photographs relating to her research on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. Other materials include a large war scrapbook for the year 1939 with many articles and clippings about Fascism in the U.S., and a biographical sketch of her career.

The Roger Fenton series consists chiefly of Mathews' research materials and sketches relating to Fenton, and correspondence (1940s-1950s) between Mathews and Fenton descendants. The series concludes with a group of a dozen photographs, including cartes-de-visite of his family and 20th century copies of Roger Fenton's 1850s photographs of the Crimean War, the south front of the Kremlin, three of Queen Victoria's children, and a landscape with a bridge. There is also a photograph and a photo of a sketch of Crimble Hall, the family seat in Rochdale, England.

Materials on Richmond Barthé consist of Marcia Mathews' unpublished typescript draft biography (circa 1975), covering Barthé's entire life and career up to age 75. Although he was known to have had a number of relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality.

The 134 photographs in the Barthé series are chiefly black-and-white images of his most important sculptures and other artwork, with several early family portraits of Barthé, his mother, and stepfather (circa 1915, 1935, and circa 1940). Subjects of the sculptures are most frequently Black figure studies, including African characters; busts of well-known African Americans such as Booker T. Washington, Jimmie Daniels, Josephine Baker, and others; religious themes; and race-related themes, expressed in such works as "The awakening of Africa," "The wounded slave," and "Mother with lynched son," with its direct reference to Michelangelo's Pietà. He also lived in Jamaica and completed a number of Jamaican government commissions for statues of national heroes, coinage, and medallions. The Barthé papers were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Roger Fenton research papers and photographs, 1833-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder

The series includes research materials assembled by art historian Marcia M. Mathews on early English photographer Roger Fenton. The earliest date reflects a transcript of a letter from 1833 from Roger to his mother while he was at school.

Mathews does not appear to have published any work based on this research, and there are no drafts in the collection, although she seems to have been involved at some level in Helmut Gernsheim's book on Fenton, published in London in 1954. The dozens of letters to Mathews from Fenton family members (1940s-1957) mention this connection and may shed more light on it.

Other correspondence is from curators at various institutions where Fenton's photographs and papers were located, and from the photography lab where professional copies were made of his original photographs taken in the 1850s.

Included in the series are six 2 1/2 x 4" cartes-de-visite photographs of Roger Fenton and his family (wife and daughters), early 1860s. Other photographs are copies (circa 1940s) and include images of the Fenton home, Crimble Hall (Rochdale Borough, Lancashire, England), and of other family members. There appears to be an original unmounted albumen print of a full standing portrait, probably by Fenton, of his father-in-law (last name Maynard), as well as several copies of photographs by Roger Fenton (1850s). One modern copy photograph is of a sketch of Crimble Hall by Marcia Mathews.

Other items include a copy of a questionnaire about the Fenton family, created by Mathews in the 1940s and sent to various Fenton relatives; it is accompanied by one respondent's handwritten answers.

William Righter and Mary Wager Fisher papers, 1830-1934

4.5 Linear Feet — 2,850 Items

The papers of the lawyer and educator William Righter Fisher and the journalist Mary Wager Fisher consist primarily of correspondence, but also include photographs (several of them tintypes and cartes-de-visite), financial papers, diaries, clippings, printed material, and writings and speeches. Among correspondents are many journalists, physicians, educators, and other notable figures of the late nineteenth century including Lucy Abbott, Mercy Baker, Jennie Chapin, Mary L. Booth, W.S. Burke, James Gowdy Clark, M.E. Dodge, Weston Flint, P. Girard, S. D. Harris, Albert Leffingwell, Henry C. Olney, W. Trickett, George Boyer Vashon, and Frank J. Webb. The collection also includes letters from James B. Hazelton of the First Regiment, New York Artillery. Hazelton's letters describe battles and political events of the Civil War, including Lincoln's re-election campaign and the anti-draft riots. The papers are particularly rich in documentation of women in medicine and women's medical education in the second half of the nineteenth century; the Freedmen's schools in the Reconstruction South; the movement for women's rights; and friendship among American women in the late Victorian era.

The Correspondence Series includes letters from three prominent women physicians of the period (Jennie Chapin, Mercy N. Baker, and Lucy M. Abbott) to Mary Wager before her marriage to Fisher. In their letters they described their medical education, their obstetrical experience, and the high cost of tuition and living expenses at the Women's Medical College of Philadelphia. Letters prior to her marriage in 1876 also attest to Wager's numerous romantic involvements. Among her admirers was lawyer and educator Weston Flint, and the Correspondence Series includes over 100 letters from him describing his political, social, and literary interests as well as his deep affection for Mary Wager. He also wrote about his wartime travels and his interest in helping the contrabands medically and educationally. Flint detailed political events of the Civil War, including Lincoln's re-election campaign and the anti-draft riots, and mentions the Copperheads. He expressed particular interest in the moral state of soldiers, decrying their drinking of alcohol and consorting with prostitutes. Flint sometimes included poetry in his letters.

Also in the Correspondence Series are two letters (1870) from Frank J. Webb, the author of The Garies and Their Friends (1857), a daring novel about an interracial couple. In one of these letters dated May 5, he referred to a 500-page manuscript sent to Harper's for an unpublished novel, Paul Sumner, which he considered to be superior to The Garies. In a four-page letter to Wager (April 9, 1870), African American writer, attorney, and educator George Boyer Vashon provided an autobiography. The events of his life were penned on the letterhead of The New Era: A National Journal, Edited by Colored Men.

The collection offers insight into emotionally intense friendships between women of the nineteenth century. Wager's female friends sent good wishes, but expressed great jealousy at the time of her marriage to Fisher. Young women wrote of both romantic and sisterly love for Mary, and sometimes discussed such issues as women's education, women's dress, women's suffrage, and temperance.

The bulk of William Righter Fisher's letters in the collection were written between him and his parents. A small cache of letters from author and dean of Dickenson College Law School William Trickett, who lived in Germany in 1872, provide a vivid illustration of the political climate and structure of the Germany of Bismarck. Also to be found among letters to Fisher are several written in the late 1860's by agents of the Freedmen's Bureau and the Freedmen's school in Wytheville, Virginia.

While the bulk of the collection consists of correspondence, some speeches and writings by Mary Wager Fisher and Weston Flint are included. Of particular interest is a photocopy of Mary Wager's article entitled " Women as Physicians." Also, the Pictures Series includes both cartes-de-visite and tintypes.

The William Righter and Mary Wager Fisher Papers provide numerous windows through which researchers can view aspects of late Victorian America. The collection provides an unusual entree into the private and public lives of nineteenth-century men and women, and particularly provides information about the professionalization of American women, relationships between women in nineteenth-century America, and race relations in the Reconstruction South.

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Washington M. Smith papers, 1830-1916 and undated

11.4 Linear Feet — 8,578 Items
Planter, banker, and lawyer, of Selma, Alabama Business and personal correspondence and other papers of Washington M. Smith and the Smith family, containing information on Smith's interests in banking, law, and agriculture, on economic conditions in Alabama after 1840, public schools and their establishment in Alabama, tax collection in the Confederate States, social life and customs in Selma, economic conditions during Reconstruction, Smith's successful efforts to reestablish in New York and England his former affluency, and family affairs. Includes a series of letters of Smith's daughter, Ella, and her husband, Hilary A. Herbert. Most of the items before 1850 and after 1869 are family letters and papers.

Personal, legal and financial papers of Washington M. Smith, lawyer, planter, and president of the Bank of Selma, relating to his law practice; his appointment as legal advisor for the Bank of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; his presidency of the Bank of Selma; the development of his plantation in Dallas County; exports of cotton and naval stores through brokers in Mobile; his real estate ventures in Selma and in Minnesota, and the inheritance by his wife, Susan (Parker) Smith, of property in Texas; the movement in the 1850s for public schools; his service on the school board of Selma, 1865-1868; his service as state representative in 1844 and in 1861-1863; his struggle after the Civil War to rebuild his estate; his efforts to establish a private banking house in Selma his partnership with John McGinnis in a general banking and stock and gold brokerage business in New York; attempts to restore the prosperity of his plantation, including contracts with many of his former slaves; his journey to England to establish cotton markets; his despondency over economic conditions in Alabama; and his consideration of migration to California. Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal Papers, Financial Papers, Printed Material, and Volumes.

Included are personal correspondence between Smith and his wife while on his travels; records of slave purchases and sales; correspondence, bills, and receipts relating to the running of the plantation; scattered price current bulletins for Mobile, Alabama, 1848-1866, and for Liverpool, England, 1865-1869; Smith's petition for pardon to Andrew Johnson explaining his feelings about secession and his activities during the war, and other miscellaneous items pertaining to Smith's activities. After Smith's death in 1869, the papers chiefly relate to the education of their seven children at various schools and academies, including Virginia Military Institute (Lexington, Virginia), Moore's Business College (Atlanta, Georgia), the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa), and Shorter College (Rome, Georgia); to the settlement and administration of the Smith estate; to a family quarrel between Susan (Parker) Smith and her children over disposal of the property in Minnesota; and to the children's efforts at various occupations. Also included are letters of Colonel Hilary A. Herbert (1834-1919), U.S. congressman from Alabama, 1877-1893, and secretary of the navy, 1893-1897, and husband of Smith's daughter, Ella, chiefly concerning family matters; letters from Leila Herbert, daughter of Hilary A. Herbert and Ella (Smith) Herbert, Washington hostess, and author of The First American, His Homes and Households (1900), discussing family matters and Washington social activities; numerous account books of Susan (Parker) Smith containing records of household expenses; course of study of the Selma Study Club, 1907-1908; catalog of the San Souci girls' school near Greenville, South Carolina, 1902-1903; the annual report of Beta Theta Pi for 1896; and other miscellaneous items.

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Edwin Peacock papers, 1915-1997 and undated, bulk 1940s-1997

0.8 Linear Feet — 630 Items
Co-owner (with John Zeigler) of the Book Basement in Charleston, S.C. Letters (some copies) to Edwin Peacock and John Zeigler, chiefly regarding their friend, author Carson McCullers. Many letters are from translators and biographers of McCullers (Virginia Carr, Jacques Tournier, and Robert Duparc). Includes letters from both Carson and Reeves McCullers to Peacock and Zeigler as well as copies of the McCullers letters to each other while Reeves served in the armed forces in France during World War II. Some letters were written by Carson McCullers to Peacock during her stays at Yaddo. Contains playbills of McCullers' plays, reviews of her books and plays, and other printed material concerning her as well as 56 photographs of the McCullers, their family, and their friends.

The Edwin Peacock Papers span the dates 1915 to 1997, with the majority of the items dating from the 1940s to 1997, and provide many insights into the life and work of Carson McCullers through materials in three series: Correspondence, Photographs, and Printed Materials. The Correspondence Series, largest in the collection, is comprised primarily of letters to Edwin Peacock and John Zeigler. Many are from translators and biographers of McCullers (Virginia Carr, Jacques Tournier, and Robert Duparc). There is also significant correspondence by the author's husband, Reeves McCullers, and copies of letters to each other while Reeves served in the armed forces in France during World War II.

The bulk of the Photographs Series consists of black and white snapshots primarily from the 1940s and 1950s. The majority of them represent Carson McCullers, her friends and family, including Edwin Peacock, John Zeigler, Mary Mercer, her sister, and her mother.

The Printed Materials and Clippings Series consists of documents related to the work of Carson McCullers. Formats include playbills, critical articles, reviews, and clippings. There is also a high-school essay on McCullers by the niece of John Zeigler, and materials related to various conferences and symposiums about the author.

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Correspondence Series, 1943-1997 and undated 2 boxes

The bulk of the series consists of correspondence written to the bookstore owners Edwin Peacock and John Zeigler, although there are a few letters addressed to Zeigler's neighbor, Robert Holmes. Prominent correspondents are Carson McCullers and her husband Reeves, who wrote to each other nearly every day while Reeves served in the army during World War II. There is also significant correspondence from the biographers of McCullers, especially Virginia Carr, as well as Jacques Tournier and Robert Duparc. Other correspondence includes letters McCullers wrote to Peacock during her stay at Yadoo, letters from Reeves's friend, John Vincent Adams, and letters from the sister of McCullers, Margarita Smith. Topics relate primarily to McCullers's work and to personal matters. Folders in the series are arranged alphabetically; items within folders are in chronological order.

Joseph Ingram Sr. papers, 1769-1935 and undated

2.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,130 Items
Joseph Ingram Sr. was a member of the Ingram family of Anson County, North Carolina. The collection contains family and business papers and correspondence of Joseph Ingram, Dr. E. N. Ingram, and various members of the Ingram family. The bulk of the collection belongs to the first half of the nineteenth century, and includes materials pertaining to the cotton industry, slavery, transportation, and social and economic conditions in Anson County, North Carolina.

The collection contains family and business papers and correspondence of Joseph Ingram, Dr. E. N. Ingram, and various members of the Ingram family. The bulk of the collection belongs to the first half of the nineteenth century, and includes materials referring to the cotton industry, slavery, transportation, and social and economic conditions in Anson County, North Carolina.

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Southern California Embossed Advertising sticker collection, 1933-1964 and undated

.02 Linear Feet
Collection of 137 embossed advertising stickers from an unknown producer. Stickers depict a wide range of businesses and products primarily in the Southern California region, from Los Angeles to San Diego. Products represented include alcoholic beverages, automotive parts and supplies, clothing, cosmetics, food products, gasoline and motor oil, hair care preparations, musical instruments, patent medicines, plastic surgery, shaving products, sporting goods, tooth powder and other dentifrices. Companies and events represented include the California Pacific International Exposition, Carnation and Max Factor. Some stickers are affixed to envelopes; others are affixed to jobber cards giving production dates and design details. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.
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Triangle Raging Grannies records, 1998-2015

.5 Linear Feet
Raging Grannies is an activist organization that promotes peace, justice and social and economic equality by raising consciousness through song and satire. They also aim to challenge stereotypical assumptions about advocacy and aging. This collection contains materials documenting the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies in North Carolina from 1998-2015.

The Triangle Raging Grannies records consist of photographs, newspaper clippings, protest song lyrics, member lists, flyers and other paraphernalia related to the activities of the organization around the Triangle area of North Carolina.

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Cesare Lombroso letters, to Prof. Riccardi, 1878-1908, undated

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28 items
16 ALS, 12 autograph postcards, signed.
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American Colony lantern slides of biblical lands, 1910s-1940s

1.0 Linear Foot — 3 boxes
Collection consists of a set of sixty-six commercially produced, hand-colored lantern slides, featuring photographic images taken in the early 20th century in areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. Also includes an original list of titles and a slide projector. The slides were sold in sets by the American Colony Stores, the commercial department of a missionary community based in Jerusalem. The landscapes and scenes were intended to illustrate biblical sites, or to remind the viewer of well-known biblical passages, but a few also depict other types of archaeological sites. The slides measure 4 x 3.5 inches. Locations include but are not limited to: the city of Jaffa (Tel Aviv); Sea of Galilee; Jerusalem; Bethlehem; Mount of Temptation (identified with Mount Quarantania); Jericho; Jordan River; Mount Hermon; Bethsaida; Mount of Olives; Emmaus (El- Kubebeh); the mosaic floor at Beit Jibrin; River Abana (El-Barada); Tyre; and the Temple of Sethos. There are also two glass slides with maps of ancient Middle East and Palestine. Five of the slides are damaged and are filed at the end of the collection. The collection is accompanied by a lantern slide projector and by an original list of slide titles. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of a set of sixty-six commercially produced, hand-colored lantern slides, featuring photographic images taken in the early 20th century in areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. The slides were sold in sets by the American Colony Stores, the commercial department of a missionary community based in Jerusalem. The landscapes and scenes were intended to illustrate biblical sites, or to remind the viewer of well-known biblical passages, but a few also depict archaeological sites of interest to tourists. The original title for one such set, represented by many of the slides in this collection, was "Lantern slides and art photos produced by the American Colony photographers illustrating Bible lands."

The slides measure 4 x 3.5 inches and are housed in a typical paper mat and a glass cover, sealed on the borders with black tape. They are stamped with "American Colony Photographers" on the top of the frame and "Jerusalem, Palestine" on the bottom. Titles in the collection inventory are transcribed from handwritten titles on the slide mounts.

Locations include but are not limited to: the city of Jaffa (Tel Aviv); Sea of Galilee; Jerusalem; Bethlehem; Mount of Temptation (identified with Mount Quarantania); Jericho; Jordan River; Mount Hermon; Bethsaida; Mount of Olives; Emmaus (El- Kubebeh); the mosaic floor at Beit Jibrin; River Abana (El-Barada); Tyre; and the Temple of Sethos. There are also two glass slides with maps of ancient Middle East and Palestine. Five of the slides are damaged and are filed at the end of the collection.

The collection is accompanied by a lantern slide projector, and by 10 cardboard squares cut out from the original slide boxes, showing the title of the collection and lists of slide titles.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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William Johnston Cocke papers, 1682-1977, bulk 1900-1960

6.4 Linear Feet — 2121 Items
Rhodes scholar and lawyer of Asheville, N.C. Collection is divided into the following categories: Correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); Writings (1682-1965); Speeches (1896-1965); Miscellany (ca. 1908); Clippings (1792-1975); Printed materials (1865-1977); Volumes (1886-1954); Pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an Alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. Most of the material spans the years 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests; family correspondence and photographs; clippings; and scrapbooks. Cocke's many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; and travels in Europe. Some letters refer to Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew.

Collection reflects the varied interests of Cocke. It is divided into the following categories: correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); writings (1682-1965); speeches (1896-1965); miscellany (ca. 1908); clippings (1792-1975); printed materials (1865-1977); volumes (1886-1954); pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. The collection covers a wide variety of topics and time periods, but most of the material has dates in the span 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests. His many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; travels in Europe; Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew; publishing efforts; and a meeting with Lady Astor and the future King Edward VII. Other items include family letters; manuscripts by Cocke's mother, Nola, including "My Reminiscences of the Sixties (1861-1865)" about the Reconstruction era in Tenn.; clippings regarding a proposed N.C. constitution amendment requiring a literacy test for voter registrants in the 1860s; speeches by William Cocke, Sr., mayor of Asheville, N.C.; a guardian's account book later turned into a scrapbook; a large campaign scrapbook for Senate candidate Alton Asa Lennon; Cocke-Dilworth family photographs and many albumen prints of Europe. Topics in the alphabetical file include civic clubs; United World Federalists, Inc.; the attempt to establish the state of Franklin in what is now western N.C.; legal cases regarding horse stealing, a slave sale, and other topics; court reform in N.C. and the Bell Committee; and the Commission on International Cooperation under the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development.

Henry James Seibert papers, 1779-1912 and undated

15 Linear Feet — 16,658 Items
Lawyer, election clerk, and Virginia legislator, of Martinsburg and Hedgesville, Virginia (now West Virginia). Correspondence, account books, ledgers, and other professional, business, and family correspondence (chiefly 1820-1885), of Seibert and of his family. The collection relates to family matters, Virginia and national politics before the Civil War, migration into the Old Northwest, social life and customs, and slavery in Virginia.

Spanning the years 1779-1912, the collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and printed material of Henry James Seibert, Sr., Virginia state legislator, executor for numerous estates, and financial agent for emigrants to the Mid-West.

The correspondence discusses personal and family matters; internal improvements in Pennsylvania during the 1820s; salt mining in Pennsylvania; commodity and land prices in Ohio during the 1820s and 1830s; Ohio politics during the 1830s and the attitude of politicians towards the Second Bank of the United States; commodity prices in Illinois during 1838 and 1840; bank failures in Ohio, 1841; wages in Ohio, 1845; care of a ward of Henry James Seibert, Sr., in an insane asylum; the National Road in Ohio; presidential elections of 1840, 1844, 1848, 1852, and 1856; the National Democratic Convention of 1844; Henry Clay and the Whig Party; the slavery question in relation to the California Territory; improvement and construction of public buildings in Washington, D.C.; coal mining in Maryland; the Compromise of 1850; cholera in New Orleans, 1850s; internal improvements in Virginia, 1850s; control and sale of liquor and distillation of whiskey; slave trade in the United States; Civil War bounty; pension claims; and other matters.

Also included are bills and receipts; indentures; court summonses; account sheets; applications for pensions; prospectus, 1865, of The New Era, a newspaper to be published in Martinsburg, West Virginia; bulletin of Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts, for 1879; pamphlets containing West Virginia laws in 1887 relating to public schools; advertisements for the Maryland Lottery Company, the Kentucky State Lottery, cooking and heating stoves, women's fashions for 1884-1885, and patent medicines; Reformed Missionary Herald, 1889; almanacs; price current sheets for Baltimore, Maryland, in 1867 and 1869; premium list of the annual fair of the Ogle County (Illinois) Agricultural Board in 1881; ballots for the Greenback Party, the Democratic Party in Berkeley County (West Virginia) in 1880 and 1888, and the National Prohibition Party in 1884; pamphlet of the National Prohibition Party; form letter, 1849, explaining the stand of the Society of Friends of Great Britain and Ireland on slavery; broadsides of a U.S. pension agency; and announcement and program of the 29th annual session of the Farmers' National Congress, Raleigh, 1909.

There are also many 19th century manuscript volumes - daybooks, ledgers, and account books - containing financial records of the general mercantile establishments of John W. Boyd and Benjamin R. Boyd; Hezekiah Hedges; Henry J. Seibert; and of William L. Seibert.

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Nathan Hill papers, 1810-1950

1.2 Linear Feet
Nathan H. Hill was a teacher in Lincolnton (Lincoln Co.), N.C. Collection includes letters to Nathan H. Hill concerning his work teaching freedmen in Lincolnton, N.C., including letters from Albion W. Tourgée. The collection also consists of letters from family members and others, receipts, material related to Guilford College, and several items about the Quakers' work with African Americans after the Civil War.

Collection contains chiefly correspondence, dates ranging 1830-1950, to and from Nathan H. Hill concerning his work teaching freedmen in Lincolnton, N.C., as well as family correspondence and other documentation from members of the Hill, Usher, Wright, Jones, Self, Bostick, and Thornburg families and their friends and associates. Family correspondence relates to routine family matters and everyday life. Of particular interest are several letters from Albion W. Tourgée, founder of the Bennett College, a historically black college for women in Greensboro, N.C. In these letters, Tourgée discusses conditions of former plantation lands in the South and states that he will encourage people from the North to purchase these lands. Nathan Hill also received frequent correspondence from George Dixon, a Quaker from Yorkshire, England who was also involved with the freedmen's schools in North Carolina. These letters, bulk dates ranging 1865-1867, describe the Quakers' work with African-Americans after the Civil War, especially the freedmen's school in Lincolnton, N.C.

The papers also include legal documents, dates ranging from 1810-1927, and financial documents, dates ranging 1823-1915, as well as some undated documents. The materials consist primarily of bills receipts, letters granting power of attorney, letters of indenture, statements of debt repayment, insurance paperwork, vouchers for property rental, and other materials relating to property, debts, and other public concerns, primarily in Randolph County, N.C.

There are a small number of bound materials such as a grade school register, voter registries, and an undated day book. The collection also contains printed materials relating to church activities and Guilford College.

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Sarah Orne Jewett letters, 1877 June 15-circa 1890s

0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items
The Sarah Orne Jewett letters consist of two pieces of correspondence written by the author to an editor, Mr. Sawyer, and to Lucy Coffin. Sarah Orne Jewett was a well-known 19th century author whose fiction is set in her native rural Maine. In the first letter, Jewett declines to send Mr. Sawyer anything to print in the first issue of his magazine, as she has been ill and busy, and doesn't want to write something in a hurry, although she wishes him well with his new publication. The second is a condolence letter to Lucy Coffin of Newbury, Massachusetts on the loss of her father. The Coffins were a prominent Massachusetts family.

Collection consists of two autograph manuscript letters written by Sarah Orne Jewett. The first is addressed to a Mr. Sawyer, the editor of a new journal, declining to send him anything to print in his first issue, as she has been ill and doesn't wish to write something in a hurry. She sends him "hearty good wishes for the success of his magazine," asks him to send her a prospectus, and "suppose[s] that, like all editors, you have more verses than you wish to print." The letter is on a single sheet of folded paper with writing on three pages dated 1877 June 15 and written from South Berwick, [Maine]. The second letter is a sympathy note written on mourning stationery and addressed to Miss [Lucy] Coffin dated 26 December, but lacking a year. A Boston address appears at the top. Jewett expresses sympathy for the loss of Miss Coffin's father from both her and her companion Mrs. Field, and reminisces about a day they had spent together in Newburyport. Jewett references John Greenleaf Whittier, who was a student of Lucy's cousin Joseph while at Dartmouth College. The Coffin Family was prominent in New England and lived in Newbury, Massachusetts for many generations.

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Desmond F. Anderson diaries,, 29 January 1927 - 31 December 1930

4 Linear Feet — 4 volumes
Desmond Frances Anderson was Lt. Col. of the 1st Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment in 1927, serving in China and India until 1930. The Desmond F. Anderson diaries comprise 4 volumes (approximately 650 pages) of corrected typescript, accompanied by maps, sketches, postcards, photo postcards, and a few printed items tipped in, all detailing Anderson's service in China and India between 1927 and 1930.

The Desmond F. Anderson diaries comprise 4 volumes (approximately 650 pages) of corrected typescript, accompanied by maps, sketches, postcards, photo postcards, and a few printed items tipped in, all detailing Anderson's service in China and India between 1927 and 1930. Entries are marked by date and location; locations include mainly Tientsin, China, and Lucknow, India, although there are also entries for travel to and from other locations. The majority of entries are written by Desmond, with a few by his wife, Hope. Anderson also quotes her letters. Anderson routinely records his regimental duties, including office work, discipline, planning tactical exercises and trainings, promotion exercises, and reconnaissance. He then describes his freetime activities, including sports, dining, excursions, and entertaining visitors. Anderson comments at length on Westerners and their views of the Chinese and Indians.

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Charles DeWitt Watts papers, 1917-2004 and undated

13.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 7249 Items
Pioneering African American surgeon who was chief of surgery at Lincoln Hospital, clinical professor of surgery at Duke University, founder of Licoln Community Health Center, director of student health at North Carolina Central University, and vice president and medical director for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, all in Durham, N.C. Spanning the period of 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. There is material on the formation in 1901 of Lincoln Hospital, a medical care facility for African Americans in Durham, N.C.. and other items on the early 20th century history of Durham, but the bulk of the papers relate to the later half of the 20th century. Formats primarily consist of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials. It is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material in the Medical Records Series have been separated and are currently closed to use. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Spanning the dates 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. The bulk of the material dates from 1970 to 2000. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials, and is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material containing personally-identifiable medical information in the Medical Records Series has been separated from the other professional files and is currently closed to use.

Largest in the collection is the Professional Files Series, which primarily contains administrative documents related to Watts's career as a doctor, surgeon, and medical administrator for various private practices, hospitals, boards, and professional societies. Of particular note are files related to Watt's mentor, Dr. Charles Drew, the history of Lincoln Hospital, and the establishment of the Lincoln Community Health Center in 1970. The folders in the Medical Records Series have been segregated and are currently closed to use. The Community Relations Series concerns Watts's professional life outside of medicine, containing files related to his membership in churches and fraternal organizations, non-medically-related boards on which he served, his work with Durham, N.C. organizations, his interest in race relations, and honors awarded him. Also included are the papers of Constance Watts (wife), Lyda Merrick (mother-in-law), and Margaret Smith (a nurse in his office). Of special interest is a scrapbook about the Negro Braille Magazine (now the Merrick-Washington Magazine for the Blind), founded by Mrs. Merrick.

Some professional correspondence is also intermixed in the Personal Files Series, which contains papers related to Watts's family, friends, finances, education, and alumni activities. Of particular note is a transcript of Watts's oral history. Containing both professional and personal content, the Photographic Materials Series contains photographs, slides, and negatives. The bulk consists of portraits and snapshots of the Watts family. Of particular note are early photographs of Lincoln Hospital nursing students and staff members.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Community Relations Series, 1948-2004 4 boxes

Contains papers related to Watts's membership in churches and fraternal organizations, non-medically-related boards on which he served, his work with Durham, N.C. organizations, his interest in race relations, and honors awarded to him. Materials include photographs, correspondence, notes, programs, speeches, programs, clippings, print materials, and a commemorative plaque. Also included are the papers of Constance Watts (wife), Lyda Merrick (mother-in-law), and Margaret Smith (a nurse in his office). Of special interest are materials related to the Negro Braille Magazine (now the Merrick-Washington Magazine for the Blind), founded by Mrs. Merrick. Arranged alphabetically.

Cathy Davidson papers, 1969-2010s

13.5 Linear Feet
Former English Professor at Duke University, and Vice-Provost for Interdisciplinary Affairs. Author of fiction and memoirs, and editor of The Book of Love and Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States. The Cathy Davidson Papers encompass Davidson's various writings, organizational work, correspondence, and materials related to Fred Hampton.

The Cathy Davidson Papers encompass Davidson's various writings, organizational work, correspondence, and materials related to Fred Hampton. The Writings Series includes her research and assemblage of famous authors' love letters (Book of Love), as well as drafts of various books, short stories, writing workshops, and publication matters. The Organizations and Professional Activities Series includes files relating to her work with the American Studies Association, the American Literature Section of the MLA, and the American Literature Association, as well as various other professional activities. Part of Davidson's Duke career is documented in the papers as well, particularly her work with the MacArthur Foundation grant for learning institutions in a digital age, as well as some HASTAC materials. The Fred Hampton Materials pertain to the assassination of Fred Hampton in 1969 and Davidson's related photography projects. This series is closed until 2017. Additionaly, permission from Cathy Davidson is required to view any materials in accession 2012-0248 (boxes 21-23) during her lifetime.

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Writings, 1990s-2010s 12 boxes

Within the Writings Series are notes, drafts and correspondence relating to Davidson's published and unpublished written works. These include Davidson's research and assemblage of famous authors' love letters that make up the Book of Love: Writers and Their Love Letters Subseries. In Boxes 1-2, files are arranged alphabetically by writer and include permissions and other copyright information. Also included are subseries on Davidson's published books: Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention will Transform the Way we Live, Work, and Learn; Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: On Finding Myself in Japan; and Revolution and the Word: the Rise of the Novel in America. The Assorted Writings Subseries includes notes, research, and drafts of various books, short stories, writing workshops, and publication materials.

War Effort Mobilization Campaigns Poster collection, 1942-1945

3 Linear Feet — 240 Items

The War Effort Mobilization Campaigns Poster Collection spans the years 1942-1945 and contains miniature reproductions of billboards designed by the War Advertising Council that advertise various government campaigns during World War II. A broad range of campaigns are represented in this collection, including war bonds, civilian employment, women’s Naval Reserve (WAVES) service, food rationing, civil defense, and fire prevention. Campaigns were approved by various government agencies. The Treasury Department is the most heavily represented agency in this collection, but other agencies such as the Office of Civilian Defense, the War Food Administration, the War Manpower (or Man Power) Commission, the National Housing Administration, and the Office of War Information are also included. Most of the posters are in full color and feature images depicting scenes involving military activity, civilian and family life, women’s war contributions, and patriotic symbolism. Many of the posters come with attached promotional literature or form part of "sales kits" designed to encourage businesses to purchase and sponsor a billboard to promote war effort campaigns in their community.

Included in the collection are examples of outdoor advertising for the Second through the Seventh War Loan drives. Examples of advertising for the First Bond drive (which was primarily promoted through newspapers and radio advertising) and the Eighth War Loan campaign may be found in the Ad*Access collection on the Web.

The War Effort Mobilization Campaigns collection consists of two series. The H.E. Fisk War Poster Collection Series contains war effort posters collected in a scrapbook by H.E. Fisk, an executive of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA). The War Effort Sample Posters Series contains a wide range of war effort posters. There is some overlap between the two series.

Related materials may also be found in the R.C. Maxwell Company Records, the Outdoor Advertising Association of America Archives, the J. Walter Thompson Co. Archives: World War II Advertising Collection, and the Advertising Council Records. For additional information on advertising campaigns during World War II, please see http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/adaccess/wwad-history.html for an article titled "Brief History of World War II Advertising Campaigns." This article, part of the Ad*Access on-line image database, highlights six major advertising initiatives including the conservation, V-mail, and war bond campaigns.

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H.E. Fisk War Poster Collection Series, 1942-1945 3 boxes

H. E. Fisk was the Executive Vice President of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) during World War II, and maintained a scrapbook collection of sample billboards that were used to sell war advertising to businesses.

Arranged alphabetically by the government agency or other client represented in the advertisements, and thereunder by the design number that was printed on the verso of most posters. Unnumbered posters are listed at the end of each group, and are noted as being unnumbered. If there is more than one unnumbered design poster at the end of a group, they are arranged chronologically.

James T. Williams papers, 1836-1947

48 Linear Feet — 36,000 Items

The Williams Papers span the period 1836 to 1947 with the bulk dating from 1904 to 1942. The collection contains the following series: Diaries and Reminiscences; Correspondence; Subject Files; Legal Papers; Financial Papers; Writings and Speeches; Miscellaneous; Clippings; Printed Material; and Pictures. Correspondence comprises the majority of the collection and particularly focuses on Williams's professional career during the period from 1910 to 1925 when he was editor of the Tucson Citizen and the Boston Evening Transcript. While the collection documents aspects of Williams's personal and professional life from his college days through the early 1940s, the last twenty years of his life are not included. There is as well very little information about the Teapot Dome Affair in the correspondence, which occurred during the period covered by the collection.

Williams wrote, spoke, and accumulated material about a variety of topics and concerns which are represented in different parts of the collection. Among the most prominent are Aviation and the Presidential Elections of 1916, 1920, and 1924 which are found in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Clippings, Printed Material and Pictures Series; Military preparedness before the entry of the United States into World War I in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, and Pictures Series; Arizona's efforts to achieve statehood in the Correspondence, Legal Papers, and Writings and Speeches Series; Massachusetts politics in the Diaries and Reminiscences, Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Clippings, and Printed Material Series; and Peace and disarmament in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Clippings and Printed Material Series. Prominent politicians such as Warren G. Harding and Herbert Hoover are represented in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Clippings Series. The collection would be of interest to researchers studying the League of Nations, the Republican Party during the first quarter of the 20th century, and the political and social climate in Greenville, S.C..

The Correspondence Series illustrates that as a leading spokesman for the Republican Party, Williams corresponded with many public figures concerning the topics above. After moving to Tucson, Williams became involved in Arizona's efforts to become a state. He represented the positions taken by President Taft and expressed these viewpoints in numerous editorials related to political matters. Many letters criticize Woodrow Wilson and Josephus Daniels for their policies relating to military preparedness and foreign relations. Of particular note are Williams's strong opposition to the League of Nations and his correspondence in the collection with leading opponents of the League, including Henry Cabot Lodge (1850-1924), William Edgar Borah, Hiram Warren Johnson, and Frank Bosworth Brandegee.

Also included in the Correspondence Series is extensive family correspondence containing material about the social life and political affairs in Greenville, S.C., where Williams's father was mayor, and about his mother's family, the McBees of Lincolnton, N.C. Numerous letters were written by his uncles, Silas McBee, a noted Episcopal clergyman and editor in New York; William Ephraim Mikell, Dean of the Law School at the University of Pennsylvania; and William Alexander Guerry, an Episcopal bishop in South Carolina. There are also letters from cousins, Mary Vardrine McBee, who founded Ashley Hall, a school for girls in Charleston, South Carolina, and Alexander Guerry, who served in various positions at the University of Chatanooga and at The University of the South. Other correspondents in the series include William Howard Taft, Leonard Wood, Nicholas Murray Butler, Albert J. Beveridge, Calvin Coolidge, Frank H. Hitchcock, Charles Nagel, Theodore Roosevelt, and John Wingate Weeks.

Related collections include the Vardry Alexander McBee Papers at Duke University, the Silas McBee and the McBee Family collections at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the James Thomas Williams (1845-1936) Papers at the University of South Carolina, and an interview with Williams in the Biographical Oral History Collection at Columbia University.

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Correspondence Series, 1868-1947 and undated (bulk 1910-1925)

Documents Williams's personal and professional life from college through the 1940s. Contains lengthy correspondence with his parents, siblings, and other relatives. Arranged in chronological order. Also includes two index file boxes numbered 1a and 1b that contain subject entries to the Correspondence. Autograph cards for the most prominent correspondents have been filed into the Manuscript Division's card catalog.