Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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ALS. Describes the case history of Prince Frederick of England, who suffered from attacks of intermittent fever and convulsive asthma.
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John Zeigler papers, 1927-2013 (bulk 1942-1946) 2.2 Linear Feet — 1010 Items

Poet and book store owner in Charleston, SC. Collection predominantly contains World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, along with Zeigler's correspondence with his family. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients of Zeigler's correspondence and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include some documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writing and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

The John Ziegler correspondence spans the dates 1927-2013, with the bulk of the material consisting of World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, although there is also extensive correspondence between Zeigler and his family present. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writings and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

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Several hundred letters and petitions, dated February-March 1960, from citizens of Greensboro, N.C. to Chairman Edward Raymond Zane and other members of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations, expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the Woolworth and Kress lunch counters in the wake of the Greensboro sit-in demonstrations of early February 1960.

Collection contains several hundred letters and petitions from citizens of Greensboro expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the city's lunch counters, specifically at Woolworth's and Kress.

The letters, dated February-March 1960, are chiefly addressed to Zane as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations in Greensboro or to Mayor George Roach and other members of the Advisory Committee. As Chairman of the Advisory Committee, Zane wrote an article in the Greensboro Daily News in the wake of the sit-ins soliciting the opinions of Greensboro citizens concerning the integration of lunch counters at Woolworth's and Kress.

Zane asked citizens to consider five alternatives to the situation: 1) "The situation to remain as it is," 2) "The two establishments to remove seats and serve everyone standing," 3) "The two establishments to serve everyone seated," 4) "The two establishments to reserve separate areas for seated white people and seated Negroes," and 5) "The two establishments to discontinue serving food."

Letters from both whites and African Americans offer support or opposition to Zane's alternatives and document sentiment regarding race relations in the community.

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Kristen R. Yount is associate professor of sociology, coordinator of the Sustainable Future Program at Northern Kentucky University. Collection comprises material Yount gathered from socialist-feminist organizations across the United States, most likely in association with the national socialist-feminist conference for organizers held at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in July 1975.

Collection comprises material Yount gathered from socialist-feminist organizations across the United States, most likely in association with the national socialist-feminist conference for organizers held at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in July 1975. Includes fliers and handouts; organizational histories, guiding documents, "principles of unity," information sheets, and position statements; pamphlets; film lists; a working paper; action notices; published articles; and newspaper clippings. Also includes handwritten notes on the relationship of Asian women to the larger movement, possibly written by Yount. During processing pieces created for use at the national conference were placed first in the folder, followed by material grouped according to the state in which the local socialist-feminist unit was located.

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The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

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Rev. William Young, was an itinerant Methodist preacher. Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848.

Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848. Each sermon is identified by a date and place and is signed by Young. They approximately follow the chronology of Young's circuit appointments. The text is followed by an index in which there is a brief thematic description of each sermon, along with the Bible verse upon which it is based.

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Isaac Jones Young Films, 1933-1940 14 items — 8mm film reels — 1.5 Linear Feet — 122 Gigabytes — MKV (FFV1) digital preservation files

Fourteen 8mm motion picture films created or collected by Isaac Jones Young, III, of Henderson, North Carolina, primarily documenting his time spent in China in the late 1930s.

The Isaac Jones Young Films contains fourteen 8mm films made primarily by Isaac Jones Young, III, of Henderson, North Carolina. Eleven of the films document Jones's experiences in China, particularly around Shanghai and Tianjin, during the period 1936 to 1940, when he was employed by the Yi Tsoong Tobacco Company (British-American Tobacco's British Cigarette Company). Images include Shanghai in the aftermath of the Japanese invasion of China as part of the Sino-Japanese War, temples and parks in Beijing, a tobacco market and factory, the 1939 Tianjin Flood, stilt walkers, and Young's European/American colleagues in China. One of the films captures a birthday party at Young's family home in Henderson, NC. Two of the films were collected by Young, including a Kodak Cinefilm promotional reel profiling Hawaii, and a silent, black and white print of anime pioneer Noburo Ofuji's 1933 film, The Three Fearless Frogs (Kaeru sanyushi).

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Letters (128 items, 1972-1974) to Young from prospective contributors to The Male Muse, including W.H. Auden, William Barber, Victor Borsa, Bruce Boone, Jim Eggeling, Allen Ginsberg, and others. Although the majority of the letters deal specifically with possible poems for inclusion into the anthology, many of the writers touch on their lives as gay men and their opinions of gay literature. The letters contain many original autographs. The collection also includes a copy of the published book.

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Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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David X. Young films, 1955-2007 12.5 Linear Feet — Seven boxes of film reels, one box of video- and audio-cassettes, and one box of CDs and DVDs.

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Collection consists of 8mm and 16mm films, videocassettes, compact discs, and audiocassettes, deriving from artist David X. Young's work in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. His New York work includes films of W. Eugene Smith working in his loft studio in 1971, as well as experimental films dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. Homemade audiocassette mix tapes document Young's interest in jazz as well as his piano playing. Videocassettes consist of reference copies of several films and television programs on W. Eugene Smith. This collection is part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. Original recordings are closed to research access pending reformatting.

The David X. Young Films, 1955-2007, includes film reels, videocassettes, and audiocassettes produced primarily by artist David X. Young between 1955 and 1996, in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. Although transferred to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library in 2012, the collection was originally acquired from Young’s estate by the Center for Documentary Studies, for use by Sam Stephenson in his research on W. Eugene Smith for the book The Jazz Loft Project (2010). As a consequence, nearly half the collection is comprised of materials relating to Young’s involvement in the production of "Let Truth Be The Prejudice," a half-hour documentary on Smith produced by CBS in 1971, as part of its Lamp Unto My Feet series. These materials include a composite print of the final 28-minute program, un-synced picture and soundtrack reels not used in the final program, and videocassette and disc copies of the reels created by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2007.

The balance of the collection consists primarily of elements related to film projects created by Young between 1955 and 1986, including Klaximo, Seven Haitian Moods, Duck Season. Many of the elements in the collection, representing these and other projects, were spooled--put together on one reel--to facilitate video transfer previous to the films being acquired by the Center for Documentary Studies.

In addition to these films, the collection contains nine audiocassette tapes, including radio broadcasts of music and spoken-word material, as well as one recording of David X. Young playing piano, and four VHS videocassette tapes, from television broadcasts of programs on W. Eugene Smith.

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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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Beth York papers, 1968-2015 9.0 Linear Feet

Musician and academic music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985. Also includes materials documenting academic career including research, teaching, publishing, and grant administration.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Accession 2018-0113 consists of materials documenting York's academic career as a music therapist, including her M.A. thesis, university evaluations and a tenure portfolio, teaching materials, research materials, conference materials, presentations, correspondence, workshop materials, a performance piece called Finding Voice, grant materials, and music therapy workshop materials.

York also co-edited a number of issues of the lesbian feminist quarterly Sinister Wisdom, which are included in the collection, as are production materials, drafts, and correspondence related to those issues. Also included are issues of the women's periodicals Hotwire and Paid My Dues.

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International collection of picture postcards (6500 items, ca. 1900-1982), almost all of which date from 1920 or earlier. Arranged by country and filed in 28 albums. Almost all European countries are represented, and there are many rare postcards from Russia. (96-0135) (7 lf)

The addition to this collection (18000 items, from ca. 1900-1950) also is international in scope, but focuses on the United States. The collection comprises fifty, three-ring binders that hold picture postcards in pocketed mylar sleeves. About two-thirds of the cards show scenes in the United States, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; state capitols; worlds fairs; and other tourist destinations. Thirteen of the fifty binders document Atlantic City, N.J., and are subdivided by the images shown, including boardwalks, beaches, and hotels. The rest of the collection comprises postcards from other countries, including Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America are also represented. A small group of postcards depicts costumes from around the world. (00-422) (12 lf)

Formerly cataloged as the International Postcard Collection.

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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988, 1987-1988 0.5 Linear Feet — Guide to the Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988

Anzia Yezierska (1880-1970) was a Polish-American author. Collection consists of materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin about the publication of "Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life," a biography by Yezierska's daughter, Louise Levitas Henriksen, published in 1988. Materials include drafts of a New York Times book review by Helen Yglesias. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Galley proof, unbound book manuscript, dust jacket, and materials regarding the publication of Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life, written by Louise Levitas Henriksen and Jo Ann Boydston in 1988. Includes a typescript draft with manuscript corrections of a review of the book by Helen Yglesias, later published in the New York Times.

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Jean Yeager papers, 1959-2012 15 Linear Feet — 7,000 Items

Advertising copy writer and artist who managed his own agency, Jean W. Yeager, Inc. based in Dallas, Tex. Later taught at several Waldorf Method institutions; director of the Anthroposophical Society in America. Collection spans the years 1959-2012 and includes correspondence, direct marketing printed materials, print advertisements and recordings of radio and television broadcast commercials and public service messages that document Yeager's career producing advertising primarily for companies based in Texas. Examples of Yeager's original art are also included. Formats include audio- and videocassettes, audio reels and 16mm films. Companies represented include 7-Eleven, Coca-Cola, Frito-Lay, Radio Shack, Republic Health Corporation, Schenley, Southland Corporation, and Sterling Optical. The collection also touches on Yeager's involvement with the Anthroposophical Society and related enterprises, including Waldorf Method schools such as the Kimberton Waldorf School in Detroit. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection spans the years 1959-2012 and includes correspondence, direct marketing printed materials, print advertisements and recordings of radio and television broadcast commercials and public service messages that document Yeager's career producing advertising primarily for companies based in Texas. Examples of Yeager's original art are also included. Formats include audio- and videocassettes, audio reels and 16mm films. Companies represented include 7-Eleven, Coca-Cola, Frito-Lay, Radio Shack, Republic Health Corporation, Schenley, Southland Corporation, and Sterling Optical. The collection also touches on Yeager's involvement with the Anthroposophical Society and related enterprises, including Waldorf Method schools such as the Kimberton Waldorf School in Detroit.

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Francis Cope Yarnall papers, 1853-1861 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 volume, 2 folder

Yarnall's bound manuscript volume entitled "Letters on Slavery," dated 1885, discussing slavery in the American South.

The collection consists of a bound manuscript volume entitled "Letters on Slavery, F.C.Y., 1853" (88 pages) and a small number of clippings, some loose and some mounted within the volume. The spine of the book, bookplate, and the copies of the letterse all bear Francis Yarnall's name or initials, so presumably the handwriting is his. It is possible the volume is a contemporary copy because all clippings date to 1861 or earlier.

The volume has two parts: a wide-ranging discussion of slavery in the South (pages 1-25) and a series of letters (48 pages) dated 1853-1854 between Yarnall and Professor M. in New York, in which the discussion is continued. Yarnall toured the South and his initial article is dated March 1853 in Huntsville, Alabama. He wrote that he was opposed to slavery, but did not advocate sudden abolition. He was sensitive to the complexity of the subject, and presents a comprehensive assessment of many aspects of slavery: condition and treatment of slaves (both house and field hands); the character of black people; the character of overseers and masters; slave traders and drivers; agricultural practices in the South; treatment of runaway slaves, including the use of dogs and murder of fugitives; the impact of Northern anti-slavery movements; the reception of the Fugitive Slave Act; the prospects of colonization in Africa; and the relationship between Christianity and slavery. Yarnall appears to attempt a neutral view about these issues in his article, reiterating repeatedly that his comments are based on first-hand observations and inquiries.

He is more hostile to slavery in the subsequent letters between himself and Professor M. Professor M. defended slavery on practical, religious, and philosophical grounds. Yarnall attacked slavery in his return letters. It is unclear whether Professor M. is an actual person or a literary device. All of the volume's letters are in the same handwriting. Additional topics include: the condition of blacks in Africa; labor in the North; inequality as a condition of life; white men's potential to elevate other races; prejudice between North and South; Jamaica's emancipation; the deaths of leaders Clay, Calhoun, and Webster; the Nebraska Bill; and Southern slavery laws.

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George Wyman photograph album, 1943-1944 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Volume

George Wyman was a Sergeant in the U.S. Army. Volume contains about 430 photographs, relating to Wyman's service in the U.S. Army during World War II, Southern towns and camps in which he was stationed, especially Camp Blanding, Florida, and personal and family life.

Volume contains about 430 photographs, relating to Wyman's service in the U.S. Army during World War II, Southern towns and camps in which he was stationed, especially Camp Blanding, Florida, and personal and family life.

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Lawyer and U.S. District Judge, of Spartanburg, S.C. Personal, political, and professional letters and papers relating to Wyche's personal life, his early legal practice, social life and customs in South Carolina, local politics in South Carolina, his term in Congress (1913-1914), his service in World War I, the political career of Cole L. Blease, Wyche's interest in reform, and the 1924 senatorial election in South Carolina.

Papers of Charles Cecil Wyche, lawyer and United States district judge for the western district of South Carolina, contain correspondence and papers concerning business and legal affairs, politics, and family matters. Specific topics include Wyche's support of John Gary Evans in his campaign to be United States senator from South Carolina, 1908; descriptions of Paris, Brussels, and Berlin in letters of Isoline Wyche, 1909-1910; an attempt to prevent the granting of a pardon by Governor Cole L. Blease of South Carolina, 1911; Wyche's term in the state legislature, 1913; Wyche's legal business, particularly relating to the collection of debts and suits for damages in cases of industrial and automobile accidents; the campaign of Cole L. Blease for the governorship of South Carolina, 1916; attempts by Wyche to form a regiment of volunteers for service in Mexico or Europe; the influenza epidemic of 1920; and the national and state election of 1924, especially Wyche's support for James F. Byrnes in his race for the United States Senate against Nathaniel Barksdale Dial.

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Lester Wunderman papers, 1946-2010 and undated 60 Linear Feet — 42000 Items

Lester Wunderman is an advertising executive primarily in the direct marketing industry, founder of an agency in his name now a subsidiary of Young & Rubicam, and a noted collector of Dogon (Mali) art works. The Lester Wunderman Papers span the years 1946-2010 and include writings, speeches, correspondence, reports, photographs, audiocassettes, videocassettes, 16mm films, and other materials relating to Wunderman's career in direct marketing and direct-mail advertising, his work on Boards of Directors and Trustees, and as a consultant. Included are drafts, proofs and correspondence relating to Wunderman's 1996 book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay. Advertising agencies represented in the collection include Caspar Pinsker, Maxwell Sackheim, Wunderman Cato Johnson, Wunderman Ricotta & Kline and Young & Rubicam. Also included are correspondence, photographs, negatives and other materials relating to Wunderman's collection of Dogon (Mali) art works, carvings and sculptures, and their use in museum exhibits, catalogs and books on African art. Firms and institutions represented in the collection include American Express, Children's Television Workshop (Sesame Street, Electric Company), Columbia House record club, Ford (including Lincoln-Mercury and Merkur), IBM, Jackson & Perkins mail order nursery, Mitchell Madison Group, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), National Observer Correspondence Schools (Famous Artists School, Famous Writers School) and Time, Inc. magazines. Languages present include Spanish, French, Danish, German and Japanese, and have not been translated into English. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Lester Wunderman Papers span the years 1946-2010 and include writings, speeches, correspondence, reports, photographs, audiocassettes, videocassettes, 16mm films, and other materials relating to Wunderman's career in direct marketing and direct-mail advertising, his work on Boards of Directors and Trustees, and as a consultant. Included are drafts, proofs and correspondence relating to Wunderman's 1996 book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay. Advertising agencies represented in the collection include Caspar Pinsker, Maxwell Sackheim, Wunderman Cato Johnson, Wunderman Ricotta & Kline and Young & Rubicam. Also included are correspondence, photographs, negatives and other materials relating to Wunderman's collection of Dogon (Mali) art works, carvings and sculptures, and their use in museum exhibits, catalogs and books on African art. Firms and institutions represented in the collection include American Express, Children's Television Workshop (Sesame Street, Electric Company), Columbia House record club, Ford (including Lincoln-Mercury and Merkur), IBM, Jackson & Perkins mail order nursery, Mitchell Madison Group, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), National Observer Correspondence Schools (Famous Artists School, Famous Writers School) and Time, Inc. magazines. Languages present include Spanish, French, Danish, German and Japanese, and have not been translated into English.

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Wunderman Archives, 1946-2010 and undated 520 Linear Feet — 354,000 Items

Wunderman is a direct marketing and behavior-oriented marketing communications firm founded in 1958 as Wunderman Ricotta & Kline. It is currently a subsidiary of the Young & Rubicam agency. The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox.

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Stuart Wright (1948-), an author, bibliographer, and publisher, attended Roxboro (N.C.) High School and Wake Forest University, where he received B.A. degrees in German and Music. He received his master's degree in Southern Studies in 1973 and a second master's degree in U.S. History in 1980, both from Wake Forest University. In the late 1970s and through much of the 1980s, Wright served as Lecturer in Education at Wake Forest. The collection consists of materials related to the Virginia writer George Garrett (1929-2008) assembled by author, bibliographer, and publisher Stuart Wright. Wright published George Garrett : a bibliography, 1947-1988 / edited by Stuart Wright. Huntsville, TX: Texas Review Press, Sam Houston State University, 1989.

A Collection of materials related to the Virginia writer George Garrett (1929-2008) assembled by author, bibliographer, and publisher Stuart Wright. Wright later published George Garrett : a bibliography, 1947-1988 / edited by Stuart Wright. Huntsville, TX: Texas Review Press, Sam Houston State University, 1989.

The collection consists chiefly of serials containing writings by Garrett, including poetry, short stories, literary criticism, reviews, editorials, screenplays, dramatic scripts, novels, and a few speeches. Many of the items are inscribed or signed by George Garrett and other authors. There are also manuscripts of Garrett's screenplays and other writings. Many of Garrett's literary criticism pieces concern the writings of William Faulkner.

Other formats include photographs including publicity photos for the movie The young lovers, screenplay by Garrett. Biographical data on Garrett is found in interviews, clippings, and biographical sketches of Garrett's career as a writer and teacher. Other periodicals containing the writings of other writers of interest to Garrett are included in this collection.

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Richard Harvey Wright (1894-1980) was a businessman of Durham, N.C., and founder of Wright Machinery Company. Wright Machinery merged with Sperry Rand Corporation on 29 March 1957. Collection dates from 1870-1980 and comprises correspondence, 1870-1941; legal papers; printed matter; business papers; financial papers; and clippings relating to Wright's business interests, particularly the Wright Machinery Company of Durham, N.C., manufacturer of packaging for tobacco products and various other kinds of commodities. There is much information on the economic history of Durham and the development of the tobacco industry. Volumes in the collection include financial records and letterpress books for business correspondence. Later additions comprise business correspondence; financial ledgers and statements; machinery licensing, leasing, and loan agreements; and legal documents of the Wright Machinery Company. Also includes one framed oil portrait of Wright, signed "Freeman. 1922."

Collection (232,267 items; dated 1870-1980) comprises extensive files of correspondence dating from 1873-1941; legal papers; printed matter; many business and financial papers; and clippings relating to Wright's business interests, particularly the Wright Machinery Company of Durham, N.C., manufacturer of packaging for tobacco products and various other kinds of commodities. There is much information on the economic history of Durham and the development of the tobacco industry. Volumes in the collection include financial records and many letterpress books for business correspondence.

Additions (4-27-79) (2002-086) comprise business correspondence; machinery licensing, leasing, and loan agreements; and legal documents (2101 items, dated 1941-1967) of the Wright Machinery Company. Also includes one framed oil portrait of Wright, signed "Freeman. 1922."

Addition (2005-108) (65 items, 1.1 lin. ft.; dated 1877-1905) comprises one letter book; one financial ledger; a judgment appeal; general contractor reports and statements; rental statements; and checks.

Two accessions (97-087 and 97-105) containing chiefly print materials from Wright Machinery Company, including company newsletters, were separated from the Wright Papers and placed in the Wright Machinery Company Records collection.

Addition (2021-0025. 1.1 lin. ft.; dated 1835-1878) contains account and day books from Tally Ho and Durham, North Carolina. There is also a volume of "The Methodist Protestant" newspaper and "Gram's unrivaled family atlas of the world".

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Louisa Wright needlework sample book, 1888 0.8 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume entitled "Needlework," containing 16 pages of illustrations for sewing and darning patterns and techniques, accompanied by 22 finished samples. The title page indicates the work was done by Louisa Wright during a "Second Year" at an unnamed institute or training facility. There are illustrations for hemming and seaming, stitching, sewing on a tape, gathering, setting-in, making a buttonhole, herring-boning, darning a thin place, tacking, making a gusset, making a calico patch, darning a hole, whipping, using a print patch, crosscut darning, Swiss darning and grafting, and stocking-web darning. The volume has a sewn cover in khaki cloth featuring two pink ribbon closures with bows, buttons, and thread button-loops. The title "Needlework" is emboidered in pink thread.
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Franklin D. Wright papers, 1790-1897 2.5 Linear Feet — approx. 550 Items

Franklin D. Wright was a lawyer from Auburn, New York in the mid-to late 19th century. Collection includes correspondence, legal papers, financial papers, and 4 volumes. The collection ranges in date from 1790-1897.

The collection includes professional correspondence, bills and receipts of clientele, legal papers and indentures, and a woman's diary. Some of the materials appear to pre-date Wright's work.

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Founded in 1971 as a manufacturer of shopping baskets; converted into a holdling company in 1985 and grew to become one of the largest advertising and communications conglomerates in the world.

Spans 1986-2015 and includes annual reports, financial statements, correspondence, artifacts, newsletters and other publications and printed materials. Includes materials pertaining to the acquisition of the Ogilvy Group (formerly Ogilvy & Mather). Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Worth family papers, 1844-1955 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 694 Items

Prominent family of plantation owners, lawyers, politicians, and businessmen from Randolph County, North Carolina, residing in Asheboro and Wilmington. Correspondence, business records, and other papers, pertaining chiefly to family matters, business affairs, opposition to Southern secession, politics in North Carolina, fertilizer manufacturing and marketing, textile industry, Zebulon Baird Vance, and patronage during the early years of Woodrow Wilson's presidency. Includes letters to Jonathan Worth (1802-1869), lawyer and governor of North Carolina, to his son, David Gaston Worth (1831-1897), commission merchant and manufacturer, when he attended the University of North Carolina and when he was superintendent of the salt works at Wilmington, N.C., during the Civil War; correspondence of David with his wife, Julia Anna (Stickney) Worth, and his son, Charles William Worth, when attended Bingham School and the University of North Carolina; and letters of Barzillai Gardner Worth. Other correspondents include Edwin Anderson Alderman, Robert Bingham, Josephus Daniels, Hannibal Lafayette Godwin, John Wilkins Norwood, Lee Slater Overman, James Hinton Pou, Cornelia (Phillips) Spencer, and George Tayloe Winston.

The papers of the Worth family of North Carolina contain correspondence, business records, and other papers, pertaining chiefly to family matters, business affairs, opposition to Southern secession, politics in North Carolina, fertilizer manufacturing and marketing, textile industry, Zebulon Baird Vance, and patronage during the early years of Woodrow Wilson's presidency. Includes the papers of Jonathan Worth (1802-1869), lawyer and governor of North Carolina, including a few of his official papers as governor during Reconstruction, 1865-1868; correspondence relating to his business interests and law practice; and letters of Jonathan Worth and Martitia (Daniel) Worth in the 1850s to a son at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, concerning family matters and the construction of a plank road near Asheboro, North Carolina. Also among the papers identified with him are commissions signed by him as governor and a copy of a newspaper article concerning a speech he delivered at the Negro Educational Convention (October 13, 1866) and a certification of election returns in Beaufort County (October 20, 1866).

Materials relating to David Gaston Worth (1831-1897) contain essays from David Worth's college days; Civil War correspondence concerning financial conditions in the Confederacy and the Confederate salt works at Wilmington, North Carolina; material relating to the Bingham School, Mebane, North Carolina, and the Fifth Street Methodist Church, Wilmington, North Carolina; there are also some business papers.

Later papers consist of business records belonging to William Elliott Worth: a ledger, 1906-1911, for William E. Worth and Company, dealers in ice, coal, wood, and other merchandise; and records of the Universal Oil and Fertilizer Company, including a ledger, 1903-1914, and a letterpress book, 1906-1907, concerning the manufacture and marketing of various fertilizers, cottonseed oil, and related products.

The papers of Charles William Worth contain letters written to and from his parents while he was a student at the Bingham School, Orange County, N.C., and at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and letters from many prominent North Carolinians advocating for his appointment as American consul at Shanghai, China, and other political posts, 1912-1913 and later years.

The collection also contains five account books, 1888-1924, of Worth & Worth and its successor, The Worth Co., a large Wilmington firm of grocers and commission merchants which also traded in cotton and naval stores.

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The Workers League for a Revolutionary Party was formed by George Spiro in 1938 as the Leninist League. In the mid-1940s the party became critical of Leninism and Marxism and changed its name to the Workers League for a Revoluionary Party. The Party was a splinter group of the Trotskyist party, the Revolutionary Workers League (RWL). Collection contains letters, memoranda, meeting minutes, and other documents relating to the activities of the Workers League for a Revolutionary Party.

Collection contains correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, and other assorted documents relating to the activites of the Workers League for a Revolutionary Party and their publications, In Defense of Bolshevism and, later, the Bulletin. Topics discussed are mainly ideological in nature and include the break with the Revolutionary Workers League (RWL), Stalinism, Trotskyism, World War II, Unionism, and various party platforms. Political developments in Poland, Bulgaria, China, and Czechoslovakia are also discussed.

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Workers' Defense League records, 1940-1949 0.2 Linear Feet — 38 items

The Workers' Defense League was an American socialist organization devoted to promoting labor rights. Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization.

Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers' Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization. The main case was that of Odell Waller, a Virginia sharecropper sentenced to death in 1940 for killing his white landlord. Arguing that the landlord had cheated Waller and that he had in any case acted in self-defense, the WDL raised money for Waller's defense, lobbied for the commutation of his sentence, and mounted a nationwide publicity campaign on his behalf. The effort was unsuccessful, and Waller was executed on July 2, 1942. Other cases included Alton Levey, Rosario Chirillo, and Tee Davis; the organization worked in support of federal regulation to repeal poll taxes. Items include brochures on the Waller case, luncheon and dinner invitations, a tear sheet for an advertisement, action alerts, flyer announcing a contest and a mass meeting in New York, and contribution forms with mailing envelopes.

Also includes a fundraising mailer (1946 May 16) related to Tee Davis and sent by Lillian Smith, the author of the novel STRANGE FRUIT. Tee Davis was an African American from Arkansas who was sentenced to ten years in prison for assault with intent to kill. His crime was firing a shotgun towards the bottom of the front door to his home while an intruder tried to break in. The intruder was a white sheriff looking for thieves.

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Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907 2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

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Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

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Woody family papers, 1784-1939 9 Linear Feet — 2,389 Items

Family of Quaker merchants and millers residing in Guildford County, North Carolina, with relatives in Indiana and Montana Territory. Collection comprises a rich array of business and personal correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1835-1887) relating to Newton D. Woody, merchant and miller of North Carolina, his Civil War service, and his flight to Indiana in 1865 and eventual return to N.C.; the activities of Frank H. Woody, who traveled to and described life in the territories of Washington and Montana before and after the Civil War. There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by Confederate soldiers, one of whom was in the 21st North Carolina Regiment; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868, as well as economic conditions in North Carolina before, during, and after the Civil War. There are also some documents and letters concerning African American life in the South before, during, and after the war. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. Other topics include the activities of Woody relatives who had migrated to Indiana; the activities of the children of Newton and of his brother, Robert Woody, postmaster, miller, and merchant; and the history of the Society of Friends in antebellum North Carolina. Includes legal documents, business records, and minutes of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, N.C.

Papers of Robert Woody, Newton Dixon Woody, and other members of the Woody family include a rich trove of business and personal correspondence; legal and financial papers; printed materials; and manuscript volumes. The papers of this family concern the mercantile and milling businesses of Robert Woody in Chatham County, North Carolina, and Newton Dixon Woody in Guilford County, North Carolina, in the 1850s; the decision of Newton D. Woody to leave North Carolina during the Civil War and his return in 1865; experiences of Frank H. Woody, a lawyer and clerk, in the Washington and Montana territories in the 1860s and 1870s, in which he mentions clashes with Native Americans and settlers, and reports seeing Sherman in 1878. There are also letters with news from relatives living in Indiana.

Other papers include information about temperance meetings, including the General Southern Temperance Conference at Fayetteville, North Carolina, 1835; hog droving; commodity prices in the last half of the 19th century; general economic conditions in North Carolina and the United States in the 19th century; the upkeep of roads in Guilford County; and the experiences of Mary Ann Woody as a student at New Garden Boarding School, Guilford County, 1852-1853. In addition, there is a bill of sale for slaves and a letter from Alabama describing African American celebrations at Christmas, 1857.

There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by a soldier in the 21st North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; and accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. There is also a May 1865 letter saying that John Gilmore of N.C. was dividing land with freed African Americans, and a letter mentioning African American violence during elections in an unspecified state in Dec. 1870.

Volumes in the collection include minutes of meetings of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, North Carolina, 1824-1830; memorandum books; an account book kept during the construction of a Quaker church at High Falls, North Carolina, 1905-1909; minute book of meetings of the Friends of Prosperity, 1913-1914. Other papers in the collection mention camp meetings and religious revivals in North Carolina and their effect on Quakers. There are also financial record books of Robert Woody and Newton Dixon Woody.

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Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s 2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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James Leslie Woodress papers, 1941-1976 2.4 Linear Feet — 1112 Items

Professor of American literature at the University of California, Davis. The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection (2.4 linear feet) consists mainly of professional papers including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works on the history of American literature.

The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection consists mainly of professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works, including Booth Tarkington: Gentleman from Indiana, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America: A Collection in Honor of Clarence Gohdes, Howells and Italy, A Yankee's Odyssey: The Life of Joel Barlow, and "Voices from America's Past," a historical pamphlets series. Among the significant correspondents are Ashbel G. Brice and John Menapace of the Duke University Press, Elizabeth Blackert and Robert F. Wilson of McGraw-Hill, and scholars such as Walter Blair, Hugh Holman, Jay B. Hubbell, Lewis Leary, Floyd Stovall, and Willard Thorp. Background notes and drafts of publication materials are also contained in the collection. The collection is divided into seven series, corresponding to Woodress' published works and arranged in alphabetical order by title: Booth Tarkington, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America, Howells and Italy, Voices from America's Past, and Yankee's Odyssey. These series are described fully below. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Woodhull was a United States Naval officer. Scrapbook of algae specimen, circa 1853-1857.

Scrapbook (88 pgs) featuring cards that hold pressed, dried specimens of algae, two to six specimens per page, some with color ink added. There are presentation notes written on the first page of the scrapbook.

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ALS. Refers the addressee to Alfred Stille's and John Shaw Billings' writings on cholera.
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Advertising and business executive. President of Dictaphone Corporation (1922-1927, 1948-1960), based in New York. President of Associated Advertising Clubs of the World and International Advertising Association (precursor to American Advertising Federation). C.K. Woodbridge papers include correspondence, text and notes for speeches and writings, clippings, scrapbooks, black-and-white photographs, audio belt recordings and other printed materials. Topics addressed include the management, training and compensation of sales personnel; women in the advertising business; corporate management and public relations; internationalization of advertising and marketing and the role of professional organizations; and product development (importation of margarine from the Netherlands to the U.S. and Canada; popularization of dictating equipment in office spaces). Companies and organizations represented include Advertising Club of New York, American Machine and Metals (parent company of Trout Mining), Anton Jurgens Margarine Works (precursor of Unilever), Associated Advertising Clubs of the World, Dictaphone, Incorporated Sales Managers' Association (UK), International Advertising Association (later renamed Advertising Federation of America merged to become the present American Advertising Federation), Kelvinator, League of Advertising Women, Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women, Remington Rand, and Spencer Kellogg & Sons. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

C.K. Woodbridge papers include correspondence, text and notes for speeches and writings, clippings, scrapbooks, black-and-white photographs, audio belt recordings and other printed materials. Topics addressed include the management, training and compensation of sales personnel; women in the advertising business; corporate management and public relations; internationalization of advertising and marketing and the role of professional organizations; and product development (importation of margarine from the Netherlands to the U.S. and Canada; popularization of dictating equipment in office spaces). Companies and organizations represented include Advertising Club of New York, American Machine and Metals (parent company of Trout Mining), Anton Jurgens Margarine Works (precursor of Unilever), Associated Advertising Clubs of the World, Dictaphone, Incorporated Sales Managers' Association (UK), International Advertising Association (later renamed Advertising Federation of America merged to become the present American Advertising Federation), Kelvinator, League of Advertising Women, Philadelphia Club of Advertising Women, Remington Rand, and Spencer Kellogg & Sons. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Womonwrites records, 1979-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items

Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

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Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

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Materials documenting the Women's Worship Circle activities including correspondence, invitations, programs, handouts, liturgies, member reflections, photographs, planning and meeting notes and agendas.

The Women's Worship Circle records document the creation and operation of the organization, in which members engaged with and performed feminist theology through the development of their own worship services. The records consist of correspondence, liturgies, programs, meeting notes, handouts, members' reflections, photographs and invitations.

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Women's Refugee Commission records, 1979-2020; 1979-ongoing, bulk 1989-2011 55.6 Linear Feet — 0.92 Gigabytes — 36,200 Items

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The Women's Refugee Commission was established in 1989 as part of the International Rescue Committee. It advocates for laws, policies, and programs to improve the lives and protect the rights of refugee and internally displaced women, children, and adolescents. Collection includes audiovisual materials (interviews, Voices of Courage luncheons, and footage and photographs from trips to refugee camps); field and research reports; children, education, and youth program materials; foundation files; former board and commission member files; Reproductive Health program materials and reports; Livelihoods program materials and reports; files from executive directors; subject files; board of directors files; and media binders for the Women's Refugee Commission. Countries represented include Cambodia, Afghanistan, Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Thailand, Myanmar, Israel, Guatemala, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan, Liberia, Kosovo, Iraq, Zambia, Tanzania, the United States, and others. Material predating the founding of the Commission primarily includes photographs from UNHCR and other organizations. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The collection is organized into several series, each representing different operations within the Women's Refugee Commission.

The Audiovisual Materials series includes tapes in a variety of formats documenting speaking engagements, luncheons, and interviews with WRC staff; raw footage of trips to refugee camps and field visits with refugees around the world; and recordings of testimony and other projects highlighting the experiences of refugee women and children. This series also includes over 5,000 photographs, slides, and negatives documenting trips to refugee camps and the activities of refugees around the world. Access is RESTRICTED: use copies are required for access.

The Printed Materials and Publications series consists largely of the publications and documentation produced by the Women's Refugee Commission staff about refugee conditions in crisis situations around the world. Trip reports constitute a large portion within the series, covering visits to refugee camps in Africa, Asia, Europe, South America, and United States prisons (where asylum seekers are detained). Also included are public reports and guidelines on issues like domestic and gender-based violence; reproductive health and the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP); armed conflict and its effects on children; and fuel alternatives and strategies. Drafts of publications, newsletters from the WRC, and a small amount of drawings by refugee children make up the rest of this series.

The Children, Youth, and Education series includes a variety of materials from that WRC program, including additional reports and guidelines. A large component consists of reports, meetings, and other files from the Education in Emergencies initiative.

The Foundations series includes name files for various foundations, trusts, and charities who support the operations of the Women's Refugee Commission. Also included are name files for former board members and commissioners.

Protection Program is a small series with materials from the Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) group and meeting files from the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW).

The Reproductive Health series is a large series with several subseries, all relating to the activities of the Reproductive Health program. One such subseries is the Reproductive Health Response in Conflict (RHRC) Consortium's historical documents, which includes meeting files, conference and event materials, annual reports, and some photographs. Another subseries is United States government-funded projects, covering HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) projects, Thai-Burma border trafficking research, donor files, and subgrantee files make up the remainder of the series. The majority of the Reproductive Health series is restricted.

The Media series consists of newspaper clippings and printouts regarding refugee sitations and the Women's Refugee Commission's coverage in the media.

The Social Protection and Livelihoods series includes program materials and evaluations, with heavy documentation for the Age, Gender and Diversity Mainstreaming (AGDM) Initiative project and its various implementations around the world. Also included in this series are reports and research relating to the Livelihoods program, WRC general information and materials, strategic planning for the group, and board and delegation visits, meetings, and agendas.

The Subject Files series includes topical files primarily related to refugee women and their organizations; issues, such internal displacement, habitat, literacy, and resettlement; the Commission's participation and protection project; and education, especially in emergencies and for girls and adolescents. Other files are related to the Commission's partners in refugee work.

The Executive Director Files series includes materials from Executive Directors Mary Diaz, Carolyn Makinson, and Sarah Costa, such as summary reports and correspondence from all of the WRC programs, UN Security Council Resolutions and other WRC-related initiatives, Board of Director meeting packets, and files for individual board members, commissioners, experts, and fundraisers.

The Board of Directors (BOD) Files series contains primarily board member packets and planning documents for Commission board meetings between 1997-2014. Some board member packets also contain Advocacy Day materials. There are also items related to the Excecutive and Nominating Committee meetings, as well as packets on specialized topics, such as peace initiatives and the Bureau of Public Affairs in the U.S. Department of State. There are a few files related to Board mailings, donors, and potential commissioners.

D.C. Office Files are CLOSED for 20 years (until 2031) unless prior permission is received from the donor. The series includes files on Haiti, Gender, Detention and Asylum, and other programs run through the D.C. office.

The New York Office Files includes material related to the rebranding of the Commission's logo and general design issues, planning anniversary celebrations, launches for reports and book publications, and general files on communications and accountability working groups.

Acronyms frequently used in the collection:

  • AGDM: Age Gender Diversity Mainstreaming
  • CSW: Commission on the Status of Women
  • EmOC: Emergency Obstetric Care
  • GBV: Gender-based Violence
  • INS: Immigration and Naturalization Service (US)
  • IRC: International Rescue Committee
  • MISP: Minimum Initial Service Package
  • RH: Reproductive Health
  • RHC: Reproductive Health in Crises
  • RHRC: Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium
  • SIPA: School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • UNFPA: United Nations Population Fund
  • UNHCR: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
  • WPS: Women, Peace, and Security
  • WRC: Women's Refugee Commission

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Branch of an international peace advocacy organization founded in 1915; formerly known as the Chapel Hill Branch (N.C.). Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Collection comprises a poster that promotes the organization's "aims to make knowledge about women's bodies and health available to women," and to "develop policy about women's health with women." Important issues illustrated include affordable health care, stopping the spread of AIDS, and a woman's right to choose contraception. There is also contact information.
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Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

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Collection comprises a four-page embroidery examination completed in ink by Mrs. Fred Kennedy in Norfolk, Nebraska, including 6 stitch samples. The exam did not provide the questions, and has been annotated by the person who graded it, who also attached four typed comments to the stitch samples. Includes original mailing envelope.
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The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of East Durham was a Quaker women's group based in Durham (Androscoggin Co.), Me. Collection comprises the East Durham unit's minute book that also features a membership list, along with four items sent as part of "circular letters" mailed from the national organization to each auxiliary.

Collection comprises the East Durham unit's minute book (1894-1904; 108 pgs., plus blanks) that also features a membership list (1895), along with four items sent as part of "circular letters" mailed from the national organization to each auxiliary. Minutes outline monthly meeting and fund raising activities and provide brief reports on the work of missionaries, with topics such as famine in India or war in China. The secretaries occasionally note group responses to such reports, including, "[this] made us all feel thankful that we live in America." The East Durham organization supported the work a missionary in Ramallah, as well as two others working with native tribes in the western United States. Circulars (1904 and undated) describe the work of the national organization and outline activities to be undertaken by the local auxiliaries.

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Womankind Books papers, 1977-1984 and undated 1.4 Linear Feet — 128 items

Collection includes materials removed from two incomplete scrapbooks Carole Powell began. Materials cover 1977-1984 but are mostly undated and relate to the founding and opening of Womankind Books, and its associated distribution activities and concerts on behalf of Olivia records. Includes flyers, newspaper articles and clippings, bookmarks, newsletter articles, advertisements, a catalog, press releases and posters for concerts, along with eight glossy black-and-white photographs of the musicians. There are also materials relating to fund raising activities undertaken by the Womankind Support Project, including on behalf of the Womankind Health Center, including mock-ups, mailers, and flyers for benefits; fund raising solicitations; and announcements. There are several items related to Powell's support of the Walter Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro campaign in 1984 and to Powell's campaign for Metropolitan County Council member at-large in 1983. There are also a few items related to Chicago's "Catch the Spirit" campaign in 1984. Includes personal greeting and other cards and messages for Powell, along with her business cards, as well as two 9.5 x 6.75-inch black-and-white photographs of the interior for Womankind Books.
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Robert Wolf was a forester with the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of the Budget, and the Office of Investigations for the Comptroller General. He is credited with drafting the National Forest Management Act of 1976. Collection includes transcripts of over 50 interviews for the Bob Wolf oral history project. Subjects include the Aztec Land and Cattle Company, 1945; below-cost timber sales and Forest Service management goals, 1980s; termination of the Klamath Reservation, 1950s; the 1976 payment in lieu of taxes bill, HR 9719; the Multiple Use Act of 1960; the National Wilderness Preservation Act; grazing fees and the 1961 Vale, Oregon, grazing disupte; the Youth Conservation Corps, 1950-1964; the Forest Road and Trail Act of 1964; the 1974 Resource Planning Act; the National Forest Management Act of 1976; the timber industry; log exports; Oregon's "Sweet Swap" of private and federal lands; public land law; construction of the Lolo Pass Road, 1957; the 1959 controversy over the Kern Plateau in the Sequoia National Forest; timber sales and the Quinalt Indian Reservation; the federal government bail-out of the timber industry, 1982-1988; the change in the Siskiyou National Forest Boundary, 1950s; national forests; the Trade Act of 1962 and US timber interests; public land management, 1950s-1980s; and the impact of the Nixon and Carter administrations on the Forest Service. Also includes a biographical sketch and an index to the transcripts.

Chiefly transcripts of over 50 interviews for the Bob Wolf oral history project. Subjects include the Aztec Land and Cattle Company, 1945; below-cost timber sales and Forest Service management goals, 1980s; termination of the Klamath Reservation, 1950s; the 1976 payment in lieu of taxes bill, HR 9719; the Multiple Use Act of 1960; the National Wilderness Preservation Act; grazing fees and the 1961 Vale, Oregon, grazing disupte; the Youth Conservation Corps, 1950-1964; the Forest Road and Trail Act of 1964; the 1974 Resource Planning Act; the National Forest Management Act of 1976; the timber industry; log exports; Oregon's "Sweet Swap" of private and federal lands; public land law; construction of the Lolo Pass Road, 1957; the 1959 controversy over the Kern Plateau in the Sequoia National Forest; timber sales and the Quinalt Indian Reservation; the federal government bail-out of the timber industry, 1982-1988; the change in the Siskiyou National Forest Boundary, 1950s; national forests; the Trade Act of 1962 and US timber interests; public land management, 1950s-1980s; and the impact of the Nixon and Carter administrations on the Forest Service. Also includes a biographical sketch and an index to the transcripts.

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During her career in women's public policy, Leslie R. Wolfe served as both the director of the Women's Educational Equity Act Program (WEEAP), and as the longtime director of the Center for Women Policy Studies. This collection documents her professional life and contains materials generated by her work with WEEAP, her speeches, women's health policy materials focusing on HIV/AIDS and human trafficking, and publications from the Center for Women Policy Studies.

The collection consists of materials documenting Leslie R. Wolfe's career in women's public policy, particularly her work as the director of the Women's Educational Equity Act Program from 1979-1987. These include lobbying materials, publications, speeches, grant administration, and correspondence. The collection also contains materials documenting Wolfe's work on women's health care policy from her time with the Center for Women Policy Studies, with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS and human trafficking. These materials include publications, conference proceedings, research reports, and correspondence.

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Papers include a receipt of payment for attendance by Wistar upon a Wm. Cohen, and an 1839 invitation card to a Wistar Party.
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ALS. Writes regarding the publication of the second volume of his work, Commentaries, with the firm of Cadell and Davies of London.
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Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.
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Winn family papers, 1780-1925, bulk 1780-1889 5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,684 items, 27 vols.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, papers, and volumes, mainly of John Winn (d. 1844), farmer, lawyer, and postmaster, and his son, Philip James Winn, physician and postmaster of Fluvanna Co., Va., and of the Winn (Wynn) family. The papers of the elder Winn relate to bounty claims of Revolutionary veterans, personal and business affairs, and include information about "Bremo," the plantation of Gen. John Hartwell Cocke. The papers of Philip James Winn relate to his education at the Virginia Military Institute and the University of Virginia, his career in medicine, the service of his brothers in the Confederate Army, and family activities, and include a description of the religious service of the Dunkards, records of the invention and patenting of a "new gate latch," and a letter of William H. Winn describing the battles of Bethel (1861) and Gettysburg (1863). More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the "New Gate Latch"; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

Family and business correspondence of John Winn (d. 1844); of his wife Lucy Winn; and of their numerous children, including Philip James Winn. The correspondence of John Winn, farmer, lawyer, postmaster at Winnsville, captain in the War of 1812, and agent for General John Hartwell Cocke, includes information on Bremo, the plantation of the latter, including also a list of periodicals subscribed to by Cocker and legal cases relative to Revolutionary bounty land.

Correspondence centering around Philip James Winn includes information on the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, both of which he attended; one letter with a description of the unusual religious services of the Dunkards; a deed for land purchased by a free Negro; records of the invention and patenting of a 'New Gate Latch' by Philip J. Winn; and the interest of various members of the family in law, medicine, agriculture, mechanics, business, religion, and the operation of a stagecoach line between Richmond and Staunton, Virginia.

Collection also Includes a letter of William H. Winn containing detailed descriptions of the battles of Bethel, 1861, and Gettysburg, 1863, in which he participated as a Confederate soldier. More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the 'New Gate Latch'; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

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George Winfield was a resident of New Market, Virginia. Collection includes two volumes--an account book and a notebook containing writings, memoranda, accounts, and time tracking for farmhands. The notebook also contains a two-page description of the "Shenandoah Bridge Affair", which involved Ashby's cavalry (Confederate) and Chew's battery (Confederate).

Collection includes two volumes--an account book and a notebook containing writings, memoranda, accounts, and time tracking for farmhands. The notebook also contains a two-page description of the "Shenandoah Bridge Affair", which involved Ashby's cavalry (Confederate) and Chew's battery (Confederate).

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Enoch Cobb Wines was a prison reformer and served as corresponding secretary of the National Prison Association. Collection comprises a letter E. C. Wines wrote to G. F. Thayer (1848 January 24) regarding his thoughts on the superintendent of schools in Boston. Wines mentions Alexander Dallas Bache, who served as superintendent of schools in Philadelphia. Also includes two unrelated newspaper clippings regarding Wines' participation in prison reform congresses, with dates penciled in as 1871 and 1872.

Collection comprises a letter E. C. Wines wrote to G. F. Thayer (1848 January 24) regarding his thoughts on the superintendent of schools in Boston. Wines mentions Alexander Dallas Bache, who served as superintendent of schools in Philadelphia. Also includes two unrelated newspaper clippings regarding Wines' participation in prison reform congresses, with dates penciled in as 1871 and 1872.

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G. B. Windship letter, 1850 October 30 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

George Barker Windship was a physician and weight lifter; he was believed to have been the strongest man in the world of his weight. Collection contains a letter written by G. B. Windship to C. C. Shackford (1850 October 30) regarding his lecture schedule. As an addendum, the letter also includes copy for tickets to or a broadside for his lecture, including the text "At the close of the lecture the Dr. will give several wonderful illustrations of his immense Physical Power...."

Collection contains a letter written by G. B. Windship to C. C. Shackford (1850 October 30) regarding his lecture schedule. As an addendum, the letter also includes copy for tickets to or a broadside for his lecture, including the text "At the close of the lecture the Dr. will give several wonderful illustrations of his immense Physical Power...."

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M. F. Wilson diary, 1903 September 21-1904 September 20 1.0 Volume — 196 pages — paper, photographs (albumen, silver gelatin), illustrations (ink drawings) — 22 x 19 cm housed in box 24 x 21 cm — Numbering: 5-154, [42] p. — Pages 1-4 lacking, 32 pages blank, glossary pages 152-154, 7 pages at end of volume contain photographs, postcards, a newspaper, and Japanese notepaper samples. — Blue goatskin clamshell box.

M. F. Wilson was a midshipman in the gunroom of the HMS Leviathan, a Royal navy cruiser based in the China Station in 1903. Diary of life aboard a British war ship, maintained by M. F. Wilson over one year, including entries related to target practice and other drills, preparation of torpedos, coaling, mooring and unmooring, movements of sailors among the Royal Navy's ships, watches and duties, cleaning and painting, preparations for inspection, and the coming and going of other countries' vessels. He also records activities during free time, including playing football, hockey, rugby, cricket and taking part in boxing matches and hunting parties. Wilson outlines his shore leave excursions to Mato, China; Tokyo; Shanghai; and the Ming Tombs, where he attended dinners and the theater, bathed and swam, or held picnics and hiked. There are descriptions of hotels, bath houses, tea rooms and stores. In an entry for December 12, Wilson notes the purchase of his photographic gear, and in February he announces that war has been declared between Japan and Russia, the progress of which he follows in subsequent entries. Major ports mentioned include Nagasaki, Weihaiwei, China; Hong Kong, Yokohama, Woosung, and Nankin.

Diary of life aboard a British war ship, maintained by M. F. Wilson over one year, including entries related to target practice and other drills, preparation of torpedos, coaling, mooring and unmooring, movements of sailors among the Royal Navy's ships, watches and duties, cleaning and painting, preparations for inspection, and the coming and going of other countries' vessels. He also records activities during free time, including playing football, hockey, rugby, cricket and taking part in boxing matches and hunting parties. Wilson outlines his shore leave excursions to Mato, China; Tokyo; Shanghai; and the Ming Tombs, where he attended dinners and the theater, bathed and swam, or held picnics and hiked. There are descriptions of hotels, bath houses, tea rooms and stores. In an entry for December 12, Wilson notes the purchase of his photographic gear, and in February he announces that war has been declared between Japan and Russia, the progress of which he follows in subsequent entries. Major ports mentioned include Nagasaki, Weihaiwei, China; Hong Kong, Yokohama, Woosung, and Nankin.

There are 64 albumen and silver gelatin photographs, probably all taken by Wilson. Includes panoramas of Hong Kong, Yokohama, and Weihaiwei harbors; as well as photographs of his fellow midshipmen; steam boats used for transport; images of the Leviathan; docking and drydock areas; coaling; along with picnics, hikes, hunting parties, and street scenes from his shore leave, particularly in Mato, Weihaiwei, Shanghai, and the Ming tombs. There are also images related to target practice for the ship and two images of Japanese ships destroyed by the Russians during the Russo-Japanese war.

There are 19 ink drawings, including one map. Subjects include landscapes, sunken vessels, Leviathan target practice, and other incidental images.

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Trained as muralist, b. in Terre Haute, Ind. in 1907, d. 1991. From 1940s-1960s worked in various media to interpret Moby Dick visually. Collection comprises undated, typeset copies of the synopsis (12 pgs.) for the musical drama "The White Whale," based on Melville's novel; notes on the set and costumes (3 pgs.) for the musical, and two versions of one page of dialog for the musical itself. Also includes a 1949 program for Wilson's gallery exhibit of 100 color drawings based on the novel, entitled "Moby Dick." There is no indication whether the musical was produced.

Collection comprises undated, typeset copies of the synopsis (12 pgs.) for the musical drama "The White Whale," based on Melville's novel; notes on the set and costumes (3 pgs.) for the musical, and two versions of one page of dialog for the musical itself. Also includes a 1949 program for Wilson's gallery exhibit of 100 color drawings based on the novel, entitled "Moby Dick." There is no indication whether the musical was produced.

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2 ALS. Pertains to the exchange of copies of a book by Wilson. Wilson asks for Hunt's marked copy and offers a fresh copy.
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Col. David S. Wilson (1825-1881), originally from Ohio, was a lawyer and editor in Dubuque, Iowa. He served with the Sixth Cavalry of Iowa from 1862-1864 and also practiced law in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., during the 1860s and 1870s. He was appointed circuit judge and district judge in Dubuque and served until 1878. He and his wife, Henrietta, had four children: Henry, Gertrude, John, and David. The family's papers consists largely of personal correspondence between D.S. and Henrietta, as well as a significant amount of correspondence between the couple and their children. Also included in the collection are a selection of D.S. Wilson's legal and political materials, such as a diary from his 1860 term in the Iowa General Assembly, miscellaneous court case briefings, and some materials from his work as an attorney for the New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company.

The Col. David S. Wilson Family Papers document the activities of Col. David S. Wilson and his family of Dubuque, Iowa, from the mid-1850s through the early 1870s. The majority of the collection consists of the family’s correspondence. David and his wife, Henrietta, wrote frequent letters during his many absences from Dubuque; both parties are well-represented in the family's papers. Topics tended to center on the family's finances, personal and family news, and local events. Col. D.S. Wilson's military service during the 1860s was only mentioned in passing, as it related to the family's travels or finances. Later letters from D.S. Wilson's time in San Francisco discuss court cases and business news, and include details on family disputes between David and his brother Samuel M. Wilson, also a lawyer. D.S. Wilson repeatedly wrote about his unhappiness at being separated from his family in San Francisco. He finally returned to Dubuque to practice law there and in Washington, D.C.

Other major sources of correspondence are the couple's four children, particularly Henry (called "Harry") and Gertrude (called "Gertie") Wilson, who spent time at Kenyon College in Ohio and Brooke Hall in Pennsylvania. Henry and Gertrude regularly wrote home to their parents and included news about their activities and classmates. Nearly all of the collection's letters from 1873 and 1874 are directed to Gertie, who was actively courted by several men. Gertrude's suitors between 1870 and 1874 include James S. Donnell (Pittsburgh), John H. Rutherford (Cincinatti), Alonzo E. Wood (Dubuque), James H. Park, Charles Plunkett, and George Brock (Chicago); she eventually married Brock on March 2, 1874. The Wilsons' third child, John, appears to have attended school in Dubuque; letters between him and his classmates are also present in the collection and include many secret messages, codes, and nicknames. "Johnnie" was regularly referred to as the Champion Flirt of Iowa. Only a few letters remain for the youngest son, David Jr., nicknamed "Dada."

The collection includes interesting political and legal documents. A diary kept by Wilson in 1860 records his activities as a state representative in the Iowa General Assembly. Also present are miscellaneous materials from some of D.S. Wilson's court cases, including several from the U.S. District Court of Southern California relating to the case McGarrahan vs. the New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company. Wilson's materials also contain a cipher that appears to relate to that case, including code names for various parties and terms. There is also a 1855 General Land Office certificate for D.S. Wilson, signed by President Franklin Pierce.

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Patricia Rowe Willrich papers, 1949-1996 2.25 Linear Feet — 750 Items

The Patricia Rowe Willrich Papers, 1948-1996, are comprised of published and unpublished autobiographical writings; essays and lectures on contemporary American authors; correspondence with contemporary American authors; and miscellaneous other papers related to 20th century American literature. The writers featured in the correspondence include Maxine Hong Kingston, Larry McMurtry, John McPhee, Reynolds Price, Wallace Stegner, Peter Taylor, and Anne Tyler. The most extensive correspondence is with Anne Tyler and is arranged in the Anne Tyler Papers Series.

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William H. Willis was Professor and Chair of the Department of Classics at Duke University. Collection contains approximately 6000 travel slides from Europe, Asia, and the Middle East dating 1950s-1970s.

Collection contains color slides from travel in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East with notable holdings from Greece and Turkey, are arranged first geographically and then by date. Original grouping for slide shows that were housed in carousels are maintained and noted.

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Bailey Willis papers, 1882-1896 1.5 Linear Feet — 256 Items

U.S. Geological Survey geologist. Collection consists mainly of letters Willis wrote to his wife but also includes letters to him and between other family members. They frequently wrote to one another in code; a key to the code is with the collection. His letters pertain to the Geological Survery as well as family, travels, the Appalachians and other prominent geologists such as Raphael Pumpelly. A few sketches are also included.

Collection consists mainly of letters Willis wrote to his wife, Altona Grinnel, but also includes letters to him and between other family members. They frequently wrote to one another in code; a key to the code is with the collection. His letters pertain to the Geological Survey as well as family, travels, the Appalachians and other prominent geologists such as Raphael Pumpelly. A few sketches are also included.

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Cornelia Ann Ludlow Willink (1788-1866) used these notebooks as a young girl in New York studying penmanship, mathematics, and geography. The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments. Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin, and was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of a mathematics manuscript workbook and five manuscript copybooks used by Cornelia Ann Ludlow as a young girl between the ages of approximately eight and fourteen years old (dating between 1796 and 1802). The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments.

Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

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William Volker Fund records, 1953-1961 1.8 Linear Feet — 25 Items

The William Volker Fund operated from 1932-1965 as a charitable foundation promoting free-market and liberatarian economics. Along with funding research, the Fund sponsored the work of Old Right economists, and gave liberatarian books to college libraries through the National Book Foundation. Accession (2009-0179) (25 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1961) includes reports and surveys commissioned by the Fund regarding education and health; sourcebooks on education resources and conferences; National Book Foundation files; and other miscellaneous materials, including a William Volker Fund office manual and board meeting reports.

Accession (2009-0179) (25 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1961) includes reports and surveys commissioned by the Fund regarding education and health; sourcebooks on education resources and conferences; National Book Foundation files; and other miscellaneous materials, including a William Volker Fund office manual and board meeting reports.

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Dr. William J. Williams and his wife, Irene Leslie Sands Williams, a nurse, were Southern Baptist medical missionaries stationed at Ogbomosho Baptist Hospital, Nigeria from 1944 through 1984. The couple also worked in Gaza and Kurdistan, and were active in several Baptist churches in the United States. This collection contains their diaries, photographs, correspondence, and other items documenting their work and family life as Christians, medical personnel, and educators.

The collection consists of personal diaries, correspondence, and photographs largely dating from the couple's service in Nigeria from the 1940s-1980s.

The Diaries series contains diaries from both Bill and Leslie; each reflects their personal style of journaling. The William J. Williams subseries contains small datebooks, usually featuring regular entries about his and Leslie's daily movements or activities. Leslie Williams' subseries contains diaries that vary in length and size; for a period of time in the 1940s and 1950s, she used her diary as a sort of scrapbook, which meant volumes arrived with all kinds of letters, clippings, and ephemera tucked in the pages. Because these presented preservation challenges to the volume, and likely difficulty for use in the reading room, archivists separately foldered the inlaid items but attempted to record where in the volume they originated. Thus researchers looking to reconstruct Leslie's correspondence should also check the Diaries series, which includes letters along with other items that she saved in her diaries.

The Correspondence series arrangement largely reflects how the materials were transferred to Rubenstein. The bulk of the letters are from Leslie to friends and family, including Jereen Rugis (her college roommate), May Bernhart, and other stateside friends and family. There are also pockets of correspondence from Bill to Leslie, both dating from the 1930s while each was in school, and from 1976, during a furlough. Other correspondence is more formal, including administrative letters from the Foreign Missions Board regarding their appointments and salaries.

The Photographs series contains albums, slides, prints, and negatives, some captioned but largely uncaptioned. Images date from the 1940s through the 1980s. The bulk of the iamges are from Nigeria, including photographs of Bill, Leslie, and their children; medical care for patients in Ogbomosho, Eku, and various villages and leper colonies; education of student nurses and church services in Nigeria; and photographs of plants and other Nigeria street scenes. Other photographs document their travels to Gaza, El Salvador, Honduras, Gaza, and Kurdistan, as well as their visits to the United States (including images in Texas, Oklahoma, and Detroit).

The Medical Missionary series contains assorted items from Bill and Leslie's theological and medical education in the United States, as well as materials from their appointment as missionaries in Nigeria. The series contains assorted newsletters and administrative materials from the Baptist Mission and other churches that supported their work; travel documents such as passports and shipping logs; their personal banking and cash accounts from the operation of the hospital; two Bibles used by Bill and Leslie; and other ephemeral materials from their missionary careers.

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Stanley Thomas Williams papers, 1921-1955 1.5 Linear Feet — 66 Items

Williams was a Professor of English at Yale University. The collection includes lecture notes, reprints, manuscripts and drafts.

Lecture notes on Brook Farm, James Fenimore Cooper, Benjamin Franklin, Washington Irving, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Herman Melville, and Henry David Thoreau, and American literature of the 17th and 18th centuries; reprints of articles and reviews by Williams; and manuscripts and drafts of Italy and the American Literary Pilgrim, and The Good and Great for Company.

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Sarah R. L. Williams letter, 1889 April 19 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection contains a letter from Sarah R. L. Williams (1889 April 19) to Frank D. Andrews, regarding his requests for autograph letters. She mentions her "constitutional dread of bringing up the diverse memories which are inseparable from the handling of files of old letters." With envelope.
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John W. Williams papers, 1822-1835 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 32 Items

John W. Williams was a Philadelphia lawyer. A small collection of legal papers, correspondence, and clippings chiefly concerning an 1835 lawsuit in which Robert Aitken of Baltimore alleged that a mulatto girl living in Philadelphia was Emily Winder, the daughter of Milly Winder. Milly Winder was Aitken's former slave whom he had freed in 1824, while keeping her daughter as his slave. Aitken claimed that the child had been stolen from him and given to Jacob Gilmore and his wife, free African Americans, to raise as their child. John W. Williams handled Aitken's suit for the girl's return. Includes affidavits, subpoenas, and notes on the testimonies of both black and white witnesses for the defense and the prosecution, including the testimony of Milly Winder, who told of her attempts to locate her daughter after she was freed.

Samll collection of legal papers, correspondence, and clippings chiefly concerning an 1835 lawsuit in which Robert Aitken of Baltimore alleged that a mulatto girl living in Philadelphia was Emily Winder, the daughter of Milly Winder. Milly Winder was Aitken's former slave whom he had freed in 1824, keeping her daughter as his slave. Aitken claimed that the child had been stolen from him ten years earlier and given to Jacob Gilmore and his wife, free African Americans, to raise as their child. Gilmore claimed that the defendant could not be the slave Aitken was searching for, in that he claimed that a woman gave the girl to him and his wife several years before Aitken's slave went missing.

Papers include the notes and evidence compiled by John W. Williams, the lawyer for the plaintiff Aitken, to present the case before the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. The lawyer for the defense was David Paul Brown. Witnesses for the defense claim to have known Emily as a little girl in Philadelphia prior to 1825, and believed her to be white, while witnesses for the prosecution claimed Emily was Aitken's missing slave. Includes the testimony of Milly Winder, who told of her attempts to locate her daughter after she was freed and who claimed that the woman in question could not be her daughter that went missing. This case occurred before the passing of the Federal Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, which removed the possibility of a court trial prior to the removal of an alleged fugitive slave.

Collection arranged chronologically within one folder.

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Jennette Williams photographs, 2000-2006 4 Linear Feet — 14 Items

Documentary photographer and instructor at the School of Visual Arts in New York. Fourth recipient of the biennial Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography in 2008. (Acc. 2009-0141, 2009-0245, and 2009-0246) (14 items; 4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2006) includes 10 (20x24) platinum/palladium contact prints and 3 (20x24) pigment ink on rice paper images from Williams' book, The Bathers, featuring women bathing and lounging in Turkish and Hungarian bathhouses. Also includes a CD of an artist talk given by Williams at an exhibit opening in 2009. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

Collection includes 13 prints from The Bathers, Williams' winning entry for the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize. Prints are 20x24, and feature women bathing and lounging in steam rooms and bathhouses in Istanbul and Budapest. Ten of the images are platinum/palladium contact prints, and the remaining three are pigment ink on rice paper.

This collection also includes a CD with an artist talk, given by Williams at the opening of the Duke exhibit of The Bathers in 2009. This item has been transferred to Duke's electronic server.

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James T. Williams papers, 1836-1947 48 Linear Feet — 36,000 Items

The Williams Papers span the period 1836 to 1947 with the bulk dating from 1904 to 1942. The collection contains the following series: Diaries and Reminiscences; Correspondence; Subject Files; Legal Papers; Financial Papers; Writings and Speeches; Miscellaneous; Clippings; Printed Material; and Pictures. Correspondence comprises the majority of the collection and particularly focuses on Williams's professional career during the period from 1910 to 1925 when he was editor of the Tucson Citizen and the Boston Evening Transcript. While the collection documents aspects of Williams's personal and professional life from his college days through the early 1940s, the last twenty years of his life are not included. There is as well very little information about the Teapot Dome Affair in the correspondence, which occurred during the period covered by the collection.

Williams wrote, spoke, and accumulated material about a variety of topics and concerns which are represented in different parts of the collection. Among the most prominent are Aviation and the Presidential Elections of 1916, 1920, and 1924 which are found in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Clippings, Printed Material and Pictures Series; Military preparedness before the entry of the United States into World War I in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, and Pictures Series; Arizona's efforts to achieve statehood in the Correspondence, Legal Papers, and Writings and Speeches Series; Massachusetts politics in the Diaries and Reminiscences, Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Clippings, and Printed Material Series; and Peace and disarmament in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Clippings and Printed Material Series. Prominent politicians such as Warren G. Harding and Herbert Hoover are represented in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Clippings Series. The collection would be of interest to researchers studying the League of Nations, the Republican Party during the first quarter of the 20th century, and the political and social climate in Greenville, S.C..

The Correspondence Series illustrates that as a leading spokesman for the Republican Party, Williams corresponded with many public figures concerning the topics above. After moving to Tucson, Williams became involved in Arizona's efforts to become a state. He represented the positions taken by President Taft and expressed these viewpoints in numerous editorials related to political matters. Many letters criticize Woodrow Wilson and Josephus Daniels for their policies relating to military preparedness and foreign relations. Of particular note are Williams's strong opposition to the League of Nations and his correspondence in the collection with leading opponents of the League, including Henry Cabot Lodge (1850-1924), William Edgar Borah, Hiram Warren Johnson, and Frank Bosworth Brandegee.

Also included in the Correspondence Series is extensive family correspondence containing material about the social life and political affairs in Greenville, S.C., where Williams's father was mayor, and about his mother's family, the McBees of Lincolnton, N.C. Numerous letters were written by his uncles, Silas McBee, a noted Episcopal clergyman and editor in New York; William Ephraim Mikell, Dean of the Law School at the University of Pennsylvania; and William Alexander Guerry, an Episcopal bishop in South Carolina. There are also letters from cousins, Mary Vardrine McBee, who founded Ashley Hall, a school for girls in Charleston, South Carolina, and Alexander Guerry, who served in various positions at the University of Chatanooga and at The University of the South. Other correspondents in the series include William Howard Taft, Leonard Wood, Nicholas Murray Butler, Albert J. Beveridge, Calvin Coolidge, Frank H. Hitchcock, Charles Nagel, Theodore Roosevelt, and John Wingate Weeks.

Related collections include the Vardry Alexander McBee Papers at Duke University, the Silas McBee and the McBee Family collections at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the James Thomas Williams (1845-1936) Papers at the University of South Carolina, and an interview with Williams in the Biographical Oral History Collection at Columbia University.

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Helen Maria Williams was a British novelist, poet, and translator of French-language works. Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. [Joel?]Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient. One letter contains the date 1820; the other letters are undated. Topics in the letters include Coquerel's position, her income, the health and situation of friends and family members, an unnamed woman she wishes to avoid, along with the imprisonment of James Wol[l]stonecraft and Thomas Payne's [Paine's] efforts on his behalf. Three letters are accompanied by partial or full transcription.

Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. [Joel?]Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient. One letter contains the date 1820; the other letters are undated. Topics in the letters include Coquerel's position, her income, the health and situation of friends and family members, an unnamed woman she wishes to avoid, along with the imprisonment of James Wol[l]stonecraft and Thomas Payne's [Paine's] efforts on his behalf. Three letters are accompanied by partial or full transcription.

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Daniel McGregor Williams papers, 1917-1975, bulk 1918-1933 0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 127 Items

Daniel McGregor Williams was a University of North Carolina graduate, civil engineer, water resources expert, and member of Company D of the 105th Engineers Regiment of the 30th Division of the American Expeditionary Force in the latter part of World War I. Collection is arranged into six series: correspondence, 1917-1918; addresses and writings, 1918-1933; miscellany, 1917-1957; clippings and printed material, 1918-1975; pictures, 1918-1920s; and volumes, 1924-1952. Correspondence includes commendations and military orders, while the writings include a personal account of Williams's war experiences, with detailed information on his division, its members, and engagements. Printed materials include clippings about Durham, North Carolina's water supply. World War I photographs include members of Company D, 105th Engineers, and the ship ZEALANDIA. Some photos are from the early 1920s and some show a clearing of land for the building of an electric power plant in Asheville, N.C. The volumes include a report on the power possibilities of the Flat River; a report on water improvements for Durham, N.C.; an annual report of Durham, N.C.; and a report on steps necessary to insure electric power in Rocky Mount, N.C.

Collection is arranged into six series: correspondence, 1917-1918; addresses and writings, 1918-1933; miscellany, 1917-1957; clippings and printed material, 1918-1975; pictures, 1918-1920s; and volumes, 1924-1952. Correspondence includes commendations and military orders, including a facsimile of John J. Pershing's signature. Williams's writings include a personal account of his war experiences, including descriptions of the tunnels dug by the Germans on the Hindenburg Line. There is detailed information on Williams's division, its members, and engagements.

Among the printed materials are clippings about Durham's water supply including the Flat River Dam. World War I photographs include images of members of Company D, 105th Engineers, and the ship ZEALANDIA, an important Australian passenger and troop transport ship. Some photos are from the early 1920s and some show a clearing of land for the building of an electric power plant in Asheville, N.C. Volumes consist of a report on the power possibilities of the Flat River; a report on water improvements for Durham, N.C.; an annual report of Durham, N.C.; and a report on steps necessary to insure electric power in Rocky Mount, N.C.

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Benjamin S. Williams papers, 1792-1938 4 Linear Feet — 859 Items

Confederate Army officer, planter, and official of Hampton County, S.C. Mainly personal letters of Williams and his family, concerning his Civil War military service in the 25th and 47th Georgia Infantry Regiments, his efforts to become a planter after the war, his personal life, and his work as sheriff and auditor of Hampton County, S.C. Includes early land deeds, and letters from a physician who served in Cuba and Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War.

Papers of Benjamin S. Williams, Confederate soldier, cotton planter, businessman and local politician, consisting of land deeds; a marriage license; several papers relating to the sale of slaves; clippings; correspondence; general orders of the South Carolina militia in 1877; and commissions of Williams for various offices. Civil War letters from Benjamin S. Williams, from his father, Gilbert W. M. Williams (d. 1863), Baptist minister and colonel in the 47th Regiment of Georgia Volunteer Infantry, and from A. D. Williams describe camp life; Colonel Williams's duties as commander of the 47th Regiment; deserters; Abraham Lincoln; military activities in Georgia from 1861 to 1862, in Mississippi in 1863, around Chattanooga (Tennessee) during 1863, and Smithfield (North Carolina) in 1865; charges against the 47th Regiment; the death of Sergeant Albert Richardson; and the disbanding of the Brunson branch of the South Carolina militia. Other correspondence discusses the destruction in South Carolina after Sherman's troops passed through; the behavior of the freedmen; articles written by Benjamin S. Williams regarding his war experiences; Tillmanism; the United Daughters of the Confederacy; affairs of the Confederate Infirmary at Columbia; South Carolina; the United confederate Veterans; Williams's pension claim; efforts of William A. Courtenay to write a history of the battle of Honey Hill, South Carolina; the service of Dr. Abraham Dallas Williams, brother of Benjamin S. Williams, in Cuba and Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War; the activities of the "red shirts" in South Carolina; and an investigation of the financial condition of Hampton County, South Carolina, in 1906.

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Amory Leland Williams watercolors and etchings, 1921-1957 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 36 items — Sizes range from 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 to 13 3/4 x 20 inches

Collection is arranged in two series: watercolor paintings by artchitect and amateur artist Amory Leland Williams, painted from 1923 to 1939; and a group of etchings by various noted American artists, dating from 1921 to 1957, collected by Williams. Most of the watercolors measure about 12x19 inches, and were painted in southern France and Italy, with a few from southern California and the American or Mexican desert. In Europe, Williams painted in brilliant scenes of Greek temples, churches, barns, canals, gardens, and monuments. The etchings are by notable American printmakers such as John Taylor Arms, Louis Rosenberg, and others. A handful are in their original portfolios, as published by the Society of American Graphic Artists.

Assembled by architect and artist Amory Leland Williams, this collection of 36 artworks is arranged in two series: watercolor drawings by Williams, painted from 1923 to 1939; and a group of etchings and one lithograph by various noted American artists, dating from 1921 to 1957, collected by Williams. The prints range in size from 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 to 13 3/4 x 20 inches, with most measuring roughly 12x19 inches.

The watercolors are scenes from southern France (near Grasse) and Italy (Rome, Sicily, Stresa, Venice), probably painted during a trip in or before 1923; there are also some scenes from southern California and the American or Mexican desert, the latest of which is dated 1939. In Europe, Williams captured the brilliant colors of the Mediterranean, focusing on architectural details of Greek temples, churches, barns, canals, monuments, and fountains. Many pieces are signed, dated, and titled. One shows the Vittorio Emanuele monument in Rome under construction in 1923. Another, a small pastel caricature, is titled "Impression of the Kaiser" also from 1923.

The 10 etchings and one lithograph are by notable American printmakers such as John Taylor Arms (2 prints, one of which is inscribed at length to Williams), Louis Rosenberg (3 prints), and one each by Carl Schultheiss, Victoria Hutson Huntley, Richard Bishop, Warren Davis, and Don Sucuum. A handful are in their large original portfolios with an explanatory title sheet, as published by the Society of American Etchers, later known as the Society of American Graphic Artists (1952).

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Collection comprises a collection of Alonzo Williams' annotated German texts. There are six titles annotated and interleaved in seven volumes, including Williams' edition of Faust; works by Schiller, including Maria Stuart, the Maid of Orleans, and William Tell; Karl Lachmann's Die Gedichte Walthers von der Vogelweide; and Gotthold Ephraim Lessing's Nathan der Weise.
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Emma Willard letter, 1841 February 20 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a 2-page letter Willard wrote (20 February 1841) to Sheldon Moore, a lawyer in Kensington, Conn., regarding her deliberations over the location of a Normal School, either in Kensington, the town where she was born, or in Hartford. She notes "that other things being equal, I would rather be the means of benefiting my native place than any other."
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Wilkins Media Company records, 1967-1998 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — 13400 Items

Wilkins Media Company is an outdoor advertising company based in Atlanta, Georgia. Founded in 1965 as Southern Outdoor Markets, the company changed its name in 1974 to Associates of the Bell Company. In 1987 Bill Wilkins purchased the company, changing the name to Wilkins Outdoor Network. The name changed again in 1999 to Wilkins Media Company. The Wilkins Media Company Records span the years 1967-1998 and include slides, photographs, presentation scripts, audio and video cassettes, brochures, pamphlets and publications related to Wilkins Media Company's activities as well as to the outdoor advertising industry in general. Represented are materials from the Institute of Outdoor Advertising, Outdoor Advertising Association of America, Patrick Media Group, Traffic Audit Bureau, Metromedia Technologies and Naegele Advertising Companies. Companies represented include Dole, Ford, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Toyota. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wilkins Media Company Records span the years 1967-1998 and include slides, photographs, presentation scripts, audio and video cassettes, brochures, pamphlets and publications related to the company's activities as well as to the outdoor advertising industry in general. Represented are materials from the Institute of Outdoor Advertising, Outdoor Advertising Association of America, Patrick Media Group, Traffic Audit Bureau, Metromedia Technologies and Naegele Advertising Companies. Companies represented include Dole, Ford, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Toyota.

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Charles Wilkes papers, 1816-1876 7 Linear Feet — 4,566 items

U.S. naval officer and explorer, of Washington, D.C. Family correspondence, chiefly relating to naval cruises of Wilkes and his son, John Wilkes; the U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842, to Antarctica, the Pacific Islands, and the Northwest Coast of the U.S., including preliminary planning, the voyage itself with detailed descriptions of places visited, and publishing the results; gold mining and milling in North Carolina; the Civil War; and Wilkes family business ventures in North Carolina; together with legal and financial papers, writings, printed material, clippings, and other papers. Includes correspondence, 1848-1849, with James Renwick (1792-1863) and others.

The largest section in this collection is the correspondence, 1816-1876. It covers such subjects as the naval cruises of Charles Wilkes and his son, John; the Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842, in terms of preliminary planning, the voyage itself and detailed descriptions of places visited, and publishing the results of the expedition; gold mining and milling in North Carolina; the Civil War; and Wilkes family business ventures in North Carolina. There are many letters written by prominent persons, including a particularly rich section containing letters of scientists in 1848 and 1849. Also there is a lengthy series of James Renwick (1792-1863) and Charles Wilkes correspondence. Other groups of papers are the clippings, financial papers, legal papers, miscellany, printed material, writings, and volumes.

The correspondence covers a sixty-year span, 1816-1876, with the majority of the letters being addressed to Charles Wilkes. The letters commence with one from John Wilkes about obtaining a warrant as a midshipman for his son Charles. Most of the early letters to 1818 are those of John to Charles concerning the son's early naval career and the father's advice pertaining to it.

In the 1820s begin letters from Charles Wilkes while on naval voyages, 1822-1823, describing Rio de Janeiro; Valparaiso; and the earthquake, burial customs, and clothing in Peru. The bulk of the letters for this period fall in 1825, while Wilkes was in Washington, D. C., waiting to take a naval examination for promotion to lieutenant. His letters concern social occasions, visiting friends, and prominent personages, including President and Mrs. John Quincy Adams and a dinner they gave, Mrs. Calhoun, and Prince Achille Napoleon Murat. Wilkes evidently made a conscious effort to contact and get to know the "right" people, pertly to further his career. Other Wilkes letters refer to the court-martial of Commodore Charles Stewart, at which Wilkes was called to testify; two French generals in Washington, Generals Lafayette and Simon Bernard; and steamboat and stagecoach travel.

Letters to Wilkes in 1825 and 1826 relate news about the trade situation in Chile, Simon Bolivar, politics and government in Peru, and U. S. Navy commissions. A lengthy series of James Renwick (1792-1863) letters begins in 1828 and continues to 1854. Renwick was an engineer and educator, professor of natural philosophy and chemistry at Columbia, and an authority in every branch of engineering of his day. The letters, which were written primarily to Wilkes and to Jane Wilkes, Renwick's sister, relate to scientific and family matters Letters of Renwick's sons, Henry and Edward, eminent engineers, and James (1818-1895), a noted architect also appear in the papers.

In 1828 and 1829 letters begin in reference to preliminary plans for an exploring expedition. Particularly, Captain Thomas Ap Catesby Jones wrote a lengthy letter on Jan. 2, 1829, about the proposed expedition. President Jackson had given him command of the exploring squadron but later eased him out of command. On May 7 Wilkes wrote to Secretary of Navy John Branch about instruments and charts for the planned expedition.

In the 1820s there begin series of letters among Wilkes family members that continue in varying degrees throughout the collection. Those included in addition to Charles are his brothers John ("Jack''), who resided on a plantation outside Charleston; Henry, a lawyer in New York; and Edmund, also a lawyer in New York; and a sister Eliza (Wilkes) Henry in Albany, N. Y. There is an extended correspondence between Charles and his wife Jane, which runs from 1825 to 1848.

From July, 1830, to May, 1831, Charles Wilkes was on an extended Mediterranean cruise. As a result the collection for this period contains many lengthy letters he wrote to his wife that are replete with detailed descriptions of such locations as Gibraltar, Port Mahon, Algiers, Tunis, Naples, Florence, and Marseilles. In particular there is an expecially good account in September, 1830, of a visit Wilkes made to meet the Bey of Tunis and the prime minister at the palace. Also there is information about the French expedition to Algiers and the reaction to the French troops. Wilkes also demonstrated his interest in cultural and social life through his careful descriptions in Oct., 1830, of the National Museum, the San Carlo Opera, and churches in Naples. He also participated in much social life while visiting France in Dec., 1830.

The letters for 1832 and 1833 fill only a portion of one folder. Of note is a letter, July 28, 1833, by Charles Wilkes's brother John about the South Carolina militia, states rights, Governor Hayne, and politics in South Carolina

A long series of letters from Henry Wilkes in New York to his brother Charles in Washington, D C., appears from 1834 through the 1840s. The topics are primarily business and financial matters, sale and management of property, rental houses, and the Jackson City Association. Henry also wrote concerning elections in New York, riots there, and his attitude toward blacks. Of additional interest are letters in Dec., 1834, one that Charles Wilkes wrote to Secretary of the Navy Mahlon Dickerson about measurements of the eclipse, and one from James Renwick to Wilkes in reference to the U. S. Coast Survey.

By mid-1836, some correspondence begins to appear concerning preparations for the coming Exploring Expedition. For example, Wilkes wrote to John Boyle, Acting Secretary of the Navy, in July about instruments he needed for the voyage and requesting funds to purchase charts, books, and instruments. In August Wilkes journeyed to England and Europe to obtain scientific instruments for the expedition. In 1837 he wrote to Navy Secretary Dickerson about his dealings with Edward John Dent, a chronometer maker in London, and later about the disposition of instruments purchased for the expedition. Other letters in 1838 discuss the organization of the expedition, who will command it, speculation as to whether or not Wilkes will go, and plans and preparations for staffing and equipment. On June 3, 1838, Mary Somerville, an English scientific writer and astronomer, wrote to Wilkec about various aspects of oceanography which were still possible topics for inquiry on an exploring expedition. In the last half of 1837 are letters about Wilkes's surveying efforts and a report by Mrs. Wilkes on a visit from Dolley Madison.

From August, 1838, to June, 1842, Charles Wilkes was the commander of the U. S. Exploring Expedition. Writing from the U. S. Ship Vincennes to his wife, his letters are generally lengthy and marvelously detailed. Although little information is included about the specifics of the scientific experiments and specimen gathering, there is a wealth of information about the people and places visited. It is possible to include in this sketch only the highlights of information in the letters. Please consult the subjects listed in this Guide for further information. In 1838 and 1839, the voyagers went to Madeira; Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; Callao, Peru; the Society Islands; and Sydney, Australia. Included is information about the homes, plants, and wine-making in Madeira; the President of Chile; travels to various small islands in the Pacific Ocean; natives; and social occasions. Also Wilkes referred to discipline problems on board ship, the officers in the squadron, the spirit of overall harmony on the expedition, and an apparent lack of support for the expedition by the U. S. government.

In 1840, Wilkes noted his sighting of the Antarctic Continent and then the trip to the Fiji Islands. This latter stop was particularly poignant for Wilkes because his nephew, Wilkes Henry, and a Lt. Underwood were murdered by natives who sometimes practiced cannibalism. The voyage was marred by several personnel problems. Wilkes suspended and sent home Dr. Gilchrist, a surgeon assigned to the expedition, and had difficulties with Joseph P. Couthuoy, a member of the scientific corps whom Wilkes dismissed. Wilkes's use of strict discipline was to result later in a court-martial.

In late 1840 and early 1841, the ships were docked in the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), where he wrote a detailed account of an adventurous trip to explore the volcanic mountain, Mauna Loa, and of missionaries in Hawaii, In May, 1841, he noted a stop in Oregon and the Columbia River.

Letters in 1842 concern Wilkes's promotion and court-martial. His name was omitted from the list of promotions in the Navy, and he was not promoted to commander until 1843. The court-martial charges were primarily the result of his supposed use of harsh discipline on the expedition. As mentioned previously he was sentenced to be publicly reprimanded.

There begins in the late 1830s and 1840s correspondence between Charles Wilkes and his children, and among the children, which will continue throughout the collection. The children with whom he communicated were John ("Jack") (1827-1908); Jane (1829-[18--?]); Edmund (1833-[18--?]), an engineer; and Eliza (1838-[18--?]). Other family letters include several from Anne de Ponthieu to her cousin Charles Wilkes in the 1830s, and a long series between Henry Wilkes and his sister-in-law Jane Wilkes in the 1840s.

The family correspondence for the remainder of the 1840s during the post Exploring Expedition period includes many letters of Henry Wilkes, brother of Charles, particularly in 1846 and 1847. They concern business and financial matters, coal property in Pennsylvania, and the sale of the Jackson City property.

During this period John Wilkes (1827-1908) wrote from the U.S.S. Mississippi, which was on a cruise to Pensacola, Vera Cruz, and other ports. Contained in his letters is a brief report of Slidell's mission to Mexico, Several of his letters are from Annapolis where John was a midshipman at the U. S. Naval Academy in early 1847. The others were written from the U. S. S. Albany, which he was on board for a surveying cruise to Mexico and the western coasts of Central and South America. While on the cruise in late 1847 and 1848, he wrote to his father descriptions of various stopping places such as the Island of St. Thomas, Curaçao, and Caracas, Venezuela. In 1848 John was appointed Acting Master of the Albany. The next year John's letters to his father consist of those he wrote while on board the U. S. S. Marion, and while attached to his father's Exploring Expedition publication work for which he traveled to Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D. C.

John's younger brother, Edmund, wrote several letters to his family while he was in school in Philadelphia in 1846 to 1847. The bulk of his letters during this period, though, date from August, 1848, through 1849, from Charlotte, N. C. As a teenager, Edmund was given the responsibility of going to Charlotte to oversee some mining and milling property there. This extensive correspondence consists basically of reports by Edmund to his father and instructions from Charles to his son; as a consequence, much information is revealed about mining and milling efforts in the Charlotte area at this time. Specifically Edmund gave accounts of grinding ore at the Charlotte and Capps Mines, Capps Mine preparations, comments about amalgamation problems, milling ore, and working stamp, grist, and saw mills at St. Catherine's Mills Charles Wilkes owned at least a one-quarter share of the Capps Gold Mine, and also had a share in a co-partnership for the mine called the Capps Company. It was his intention to obtain possession of the engine at the Capps Mine and to provide facilities for others to use it either for shares or by a tribute system. He also wished to make St. Catherine's Mills a business place for grinding all sorts of ores, but none of his ventures in Charlotte was ever very successful or profitable.

In the summer of 1848 Jane Wilkes, the wife of Charles, took a vacation in Newport, Rhode Island, a fashionable summer resort area. Her letters in July describe the people and activities there. Mrs. Wilkes had suffered a leg injury in June, which worsened over the summer. She died in August in Newport while her husband was on a trip to South Carolina and also to Charlotte to inspect family property.

As previously noted there is a series of James Renwick (1792-1863) letters in this collection. The correspondence is particularly heavy for the 1843 to 1849 period. The letters concern reviewing of the manuscript of the Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition and his calculations made from measurements made during magnetic observations on the expedition. Renwick also wrote about his attempt to be appointed to the U. S. Boundary Commission, which failed, and the beginning careers of his three cons.

The period, 1848 to 1849, is an especially rich one for this collection in terms of the correspondence of prominent persons it contains. From 1843 to 1861, Charles Wilkes was assigned to special service, chiefly in Washington, D, C., preparing for publication and publishing the information collected on the Exploring Expedition. Much of his correspondence during 1848 to 1849 deals with describing and cataloging the specimens, such as lichens, collected on the expedition; work on preparing charts; writing, editing, and publishing of volumes; and paying the bills for this work.

In the course of this work Wilkes received letters from many prominent scientists, naval officers, senators and congressmen, and statesmen. Please consult the "List of Selected Persons" in this Guide for an extensive listing of correspondents. Of particular interest are four series of letters: 1. Asa Gray, botanist, to Wilkes from 1849 to 1859, writing about work on the botany of the Exploring Expedition; 2. Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz, zoologist, corresponding to Wilkes from 1849 to 1861, concerning drawings of fish and echinoderm specimens from the expedition; 3. Joseph Henry, scientist and first director of the Smithsonian Institution, writing, 1849 to 1875, about loans of Exploring Expedition specimens; and 4. John R. Bartlett (1805-1886), state official and bibliographer, writing in 1849 about the sales of the Narrative and the publication of a spurious abridgment of the work. Other scientists who corresponded include Isaac Lea, James D. Dana (1813-1895), William D. Brackenridge, Titian Ramsay Peale, William S. Sullivant, and Edward Tuckerman.

The correspondence for the 1850s continues two important themes of the collection: the continuing work concerning the Exploring Expedition, and gold mining and milling in North Carolina. Throughout, there are letters referring to various aspects of the Exploring Expedition work, such as descriptions being made of specimens, appropriations and bills, as well as letters from many prominent scientists. Examples of such letters are Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz writing about the classification and drawings of fish specimens, Asa Gray about his work describing the botany of the expedition and William Sullivant's drawings of mosses, Spencer F. Baird about his report on the reptiles, William Sullivant about the engraving of drawings and publication of his work on mosses, and Charles Pickering about his report on the geographical distribution of plants and animals.

Many other prominent persons who were not scientists also corresponded with Wilkes during the 1850s, Of interest is a letter dated April 9, 1851, from President Millard Fillmore to Wilkes thanking him for sending a copy of his work on meteorology.

A very long series of letters between Charles Wilkes and his younger son Edmund continues from the 1840s through the 1850s, Most of the early letters concern the mills at St, Catherine's Mills near Charlotte, N. C.; financial matters; and the fact that the mills are not proving to be a very successful venture, In the summer of 1850, Edmund returned home and then in September began attending the Laurence Scientific School at Harvard to train to be an engineer, The remainder of his letters for this period primarily concern his work as an engineer on railroads in Ohio, particularly in Zanesville. His letters describe hits work, operations of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the many accidents on this railroad in 1858.

The very long series of letters from John to his father Charles Wilkes continues in 1850 until 1852 while John is on board the U.S.S. Marion on a cruise continuing to places such as Rio de Janeiro, China, and Manila Bay. He wrote very lengthy descriptive letters on this cruise. In the summer of 1852 he was working on the calculations for observations of the Exploring Expedition and also corresponded while on trips to Pennsylvania and Ohio.

The remainder of the correspondence of John Wilkes as well as that of some others pertains to mining and milling operations in the Charlotte area. In 1853 John went to North Carolina to be superintendent of the Capps mining operations and presumably to continue work begun by his brother Edmund earlier. John wrote about the condition of various mines, such as the Capps, McGinn, and Dunn mines; mining operations, such as pumping water out of the Capps mine shaft; his brief tenure as agent of the Capps Mining Company; problems with the Capps Company; and continual financial problems. By August, 1855, the Capps Mine was defunct. Charles Wilkes had been President of the St. Catherine's Mining Company. John also became involved in milling operations and sent back reports about the work, progress, and machinery repairs at the St. Catherine's Mills; stamp mills; flour and corn milling; and questions about Wilkes's ownership of St. Catherine's Mills. In 1858 John turned his attention to the Mecklenburg Flour Mills, which he purchased with William R. Myers. Other correspondence concerns a proposed St. Catherine Gold Mining Company, which would have been formed to sell a newly invented machine for reducing metallic ores.

There is considerably less bulk for the 1860s and 1870s than for earlier years, there being one box of material for each of these decades. Certain letters in 1860 begin to mention the possibility of secession. Throughout the Civil War period are references to various battles, ships, naval and army officers, and views on the war. On November 8, 1861, Charles Wilkes commanded that the British mail steamer Trent halt and be boarded. He then searched the vessel, arrested the Confederate commissioners James Mason and John Slidell, and removed them to the U.S. Ship San Jacinto. Wilkes's primary error was in searching a neutral vessel and seizing the agents on board, rather than bringing the ship into port. His actions became quite controversial both in the United States and in Europe. Although the British people were outraged by the events, a majority of Lincoln's cabinet applauded the act. The matter was finally resolved, though, when Secretary of State Seward released the prisoners, realizing that the alternative was war with England. Two letters in 1862, written by Michele Costi, a publicist living in Venice, address this affair. He wrote a strong defense of Wilkes's actions in the Trent affair. A copy of Costi's, In difesa del San Giacinto, is contained in the writings. There is no firsthand account by Wilkes of this affair in the collection.

In July and August, 1862, there is a series of letters from Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to Charles Wilkes, who was co landing the James River Flotilla at that time. Also in 1862 are various orders about ships, crews, and discharges, as well as letters concerning aspects of the U. S. Navy, such as health, medical care, surgeons, liquor, and deserters. Many of the letters in 1862 and 1863 comment on General George Brinton McClellan, particularly after his removal as commander-in-chief of the U. S. Army; the Wilkes family favored him. In late 1862 and early 1863 letters refer to the fact that Wilkes was passed over for promotion to rear admiral and to his reputation as an officer. His wife Mary had much correspondence attempting to secure the promotion. Wilkes was not promoted to rear admiral on the retired list until 1866. On June 1, 1863, he was detached from the West India Squadron and recalled home. Unfortunately his letters for this period at sea, 1861-1863, are not included in this collection. Only a handful of letters exist for 1864; two of them are from Wilkes to Gideon Welles concerning Wilkes's court-martial.

Family letters during the Civil War are concentrated mainly in 1862 and 1863, while Wilkes was at sea. His wife and two older daughters remained in Washington, D. C., and in their letters they discuss prominent citizens of the city, army generals, naval officers, and activities there. Many letters refer to business and financial matters.

At the conclusion of the Civil War, John Wilkes's letters from Charlotte to his father resume. John was at this time serving as the first president of the First National Bank of Charlotte and had resumed operations at the Mecklenburg Iron Works which he owned. His letters relate to business and economic conditions in North Carolina and the South during Reconstruction, making a start again after the Civil War, and business and financial matters. Wilkes was in a partnership that owned the Rock Island Manufacturing Company; letters refer to its financial problems. In about 1866, Charles Wilkes moved to Gaston County, North Carolina, where he had purchased the High Shoals Iron Works. He had a contract of sale, but no deed, so protracted legal battles ensued. The Iron Works continued to produce batches of pig iron and manufacture nails. Letters in the collection pertain to the Iron Works and its production. Only a few letters exist for 1868 and 1869.

The correspondence for the 1870s consists primarily of family letters, mostly written by John Wilkes to his father. Letters continue about the problems of the Rock Island Manufacturing Company, which had failed in about 1869. Other letters concern the Mecklenburg Iron Works, which was at one time called the Mecklenburg Foundry and Machine Shops, of which he was proprietor. He also referred to the continued question of ownership of the High Shoals Iron Works and the appropriation for the work of the Exploring Expedition in 1870. A few other letters were written by Mary and Edmund Wilkes, who went to live in Salt Lake City in 1871, but returned to New York later.

Other letters for the 1870s pertain to the Exploring Expedition. Charles Wilkes wrote to Lot M. Morrill about publishing the volumes of the work of the expedition. There are letters from Frederick D. Stuart, assistant to Wilkes, concerning funds to finish the publication of the Exploring Expedition volumes. It was difficult in the later years to obtain this funding from Congress.

The two clippings are a picture of Charles Wilkes and an article, 1862, concerning publication of the results of the Exploring Expedition.

The financial papers, 1830-1875, include such items as financial statements, Exploring Expedition statements, bills, receipts, cost estimate, and a bond.

In the legal papers, which span the years 1827-1865, are indentures, many of which are signed by Charles Wilkes and Richard B. Mason, among other parties. Also included are articles of association and other papers for the Jackson City Association, a signed approval by Secretary of the Navy Isaac Toucey of a summons to Wilkes for a trial, and undated plats. There are court documents, such as agreements, summons, a complaint, and a memorandum. Some of these items pertain to litigation concerning a Lynch vs. Wilkes family real estate dispute.

The miscellany consists of papers, 1825-1875. Exploring Expedition items include a memo in 1838 concerning the acting appointments as commanders of Charles Wilkes and William H. Hudson, magnetic measurements, and in 1858 a few items about revisions to various maps and publications of the expedition. Three depositions occur in this section in 1862 concerning fortifications at Drewry's Bluff. They are written by a deserter from the Confederate Navy, a former Confederate soldier, and a New York soldier who had been behind Confederate lines. Other Civil War papers in 1863 and 1864 relate to the court-martial of Wilkes.

The printed material spans the years 1849 to 1874. Included is a broadside that General John James Peck penned on September 20, 1864, entitled, "Siege of Suffolk-Chancellorsville." The purpose of the paper was to debunk the idea that any significant portion of Longstreet's army was transferred to Chancellorsville. In the printed material also is "Report on the High Shoals Property in Gaston County, North Carolina" by F. Winter. This is a proof of the pamphlet written in 1873 concerning the geology of High Shoals. Other titles are "Working the Gold Mines in New Granada," "Prospectus of the American Review, " and "Map of the City of Zanesville."

While the writings cover the two years, 1862 to 1863, most of them are undated. Included is a copy in Italian of "In difesa del San Giacinto," 1862, by Michele Costi. This was a defense of Wilkes's actions in the Trent affair. An English translation of this item was published as a pamphlet under the title, Memoir on the Trent Affair. A copy is housed in the Rare Book Room. Related items are "The Surrender of Mason and Slidell" written in Wilkes's hand and another article, both of which defend his actions in the Trent affair. Copies of "Naval Reform" and "Abuses in the Navy," 1862, are also included. Two folders contain the sixteen-chapter manuscript "Trip to the Far West" by Charles Wilkes in 1863. The narrative is comprised of descriptions of the localities visited, including Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Milwaukee, the Mississippi River, St. Paul, Iowa (especially Dubuque), St. Louis, Cincinnati, Erie, New York--Buffalo and Niagara Falls, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York City. "Canal Trip in Peru" is listed as being included with the manuscript but is not a part of this collection. Other undated writings describe various aspects of New York City, iron-clad vessels, New Jersey, and Baltimore.

The volumes, 1823-1847, include account books of Charles Wilkes, a notebook owned by Edmund Wilkes, and "Notes related to Fejee [sic] Islands." There is an account book for the ship O'Cain, 1823, maintained while Wilkes was on a trip to ports in the South Atlantic on a sealing voyage. Wilkes was in command of the ship, which was fitted out by its owner, Mr. Winship. Other financial records of Charles Wilkes are in three Daybooks of Receipts and Expenses, 1828-1829, 1829-1832, and 1833-1835. Edmund Wilkes kept the notebook in 1847 while he was a student in Philadelphia. Evidently it was from a chemistry course. Charles Wilkes wrote "Notes related to Fejee [sic] Islands" from July 15 to August 7, 1840, while on the Exploring Expedition.

Two oversize items are in oversize storage: "Map of the World shewing [sic] the Extent and Direction of the Wind and the Route To Be Followed in a Circumnavigation of the Globe" by Charles Wilkes, 1856, and a broadside, including a plat of several lots of Charles Wilkes's land in Washington, D. C. for sale, May 12, 1874.

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James King Wilkerson papers, 1820-1929 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 896 Items

Confederate soldier, member of the 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. K; and farmer, from Granville County, N.C. The papers of James King Wilkerson and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson and Luther Wilkerson, James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter. The Civil War letters, written by James Wilkerson to his family, contain references to the C.S.S. Virginia, detailed descriptions of marches, comments on crop conditions as he moved from place to place, his Civil War service around Petersburg, Virginia, late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865.

The papers of James King Wilkerson (1842-1919) and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks belonging to James when he was 16 and 17, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson (1877-1955) and Luther Wilkerson (1874-1942), James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter.

The Civil War letters were all or nearly all written by James Wilkerson, who served in the Confederate Army, 55th North Carolina Regiment, Company K, from Aug. 1861 through spring of 1865. His letters to his family are significant for their references to the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (the former U.S.S. Merrimac); detailed descriptions of marches, including references to orders dealing with men who couldn't keep up or fell during the march; comments on the condition of crops as he moved to different locales; and references to his Civil War service around Petersburg, Va. late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865. The collection is rounded out by a copy of The Spirit of Prayer (Nathaniel Vincent, 1840), owned by James K. Wilkerson during the Civil War.

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Daniel Levinson Wilk is a historian. Muravchik was a longtime staff member of the Socialist Party of America and the Jewish Labor Committee. Collection comprises an audiocassette tape of the oral history interview conducted by Wilk with Emanuel Muravchik while Wilk was completing his graduate work at Duke University. The interview primarily focused on Muravchik's career in the Socialist Party, particularly from the 1920s to the 1950s, and mostly in New York State. There is no transcript for the interview, and two digital files have been created from the audiocassette.

Collection comprises an audiocassette tape of the oral history interview conducted by Wilk with Emanuel Muravchik while Wilk was completing his graduate work at Duke University. The interview primarily focused on Muravchik's career in the Socialist Party, particularly from the 1920s to the 1950s, and mostly in New York State. Related topics include Muravchick's education; the process followed to place Norman Thomas on the New York State ballot as a Socialist Party candidate for the 1940 Presidential election; the relationships between socialists and communists; approaches used to build the Socialist movement; union and other organizing; as well as the impact of WWII on the movement and its leaders. Among the noted persons mentioned was J. Edgar Hoover. There is no transcript for the interview, and two digital files have been created from the audiocassette.

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Lady Wilde letter, 1852 November 19 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection comprises a letter from Lady Wilde discussing the loss of her mother, followed by her marriage, and announcing the birth of her eldest son, William Charles Kingsbury Wilde. She also comments on marriage, "a woman's duty ends with marriage. She becomes a vegetable, a house leek, a mop--I feel that I am 'potted' for the rest of my days...." Includes an enclosure with a note written in another hand identifying Wilde along with the letter's recipient, whose last name may be Grant.
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Political and personal correspondence of William Wilberforce (1759-1833), member of the House of Commons. Many letters relate to his leadership in the movement for Britain's abolition of the slave trade. Correspondence discusses the evils of the slave trade; the slave trade in Dutch, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish colonies; slavery, especially in the West Indies; the composition and distribution of pamphlets on the slave trade; the attendance of Thomas Clarkson at the Congress of Vienna against Wilberforce's advice; William Pitt's (1759-1806) support of the abolition movement; efforts to interest the Roman Catholic Church in the abolition cause; the determination as to whether abolition could be enforced; and noted English and French leaders and their position on the abolition question. Other topics discussed include British foreign relations; the Church of England; Roman Catholicism in Ireland; politics and government in England, France, Ireland, Jamaica, Sierra Leone, Trinidad, and Venezuela; elections; French colonies; free trade versus protection; the French Revolution; Greek Independence; Haiti; South Africa; the Society of Friends; the Royal Navy; parliamentary reform; need to reform the penal code; and personal matters including Wilberforce's failing health. Correspondents include British politician William Pitt (the younger); Thomas Harrison, a close friend and a member of the Duke of Gloucester's West India Committee; Hannah More, an English writer and philanthropist; his close friend John Scandrett Harford, Jr. of Blaise Castle (near Bristol, England); George Montagu, Fourth Duke of Manchester; Lord Brougham; Spencer Perceval; Thomas Chalmers; George Canning; and John Bowdler (d. 1815).

Collection consists largely of correspondence to and from William Wilberforce, with subjects ranging across abolitionist politics in Great Britain, business correspondence about the West India Committee, and personal family news and health. Correspondents include British politician William Pitt (the younger); Thomas Harrison, a close friend and a member of the Duke of Gloucester's West India Committee; Hannah More, an English writer and philanthropist; his close friend John Scandrett Harford, Jr. of Blaise Castle (near Bristol, England); George Montagu, Fourth Duke of Manchester; Lord Brougham; Spencer Perceval; Thomas Chalmers; George Canning; and John Bowdler (d. 1815).

Letters from this collection, particularly in the 1810s, often reference slavery and Wilberforce's work with abolitionists. In one letter of Aug. 10, 1814, Wilberforce wrote Harrison that he had been able to persuade Thomas Clarkson not to attend the Congress of Vienna. Articles appeared in The Edinburgh Review during 1814 which questioned William Pitt's motives in supporting the abolitionists. Wilberforce (Oct. 22, 1814) wrote Harrison concerning his relations with the younger Pitt (d. 1806), and stated that his belief was that Pitt had been a "sincere friend" of the abolition movement. Other letters for 1814 mention such things as the West India Committee and its membership, including the Duke of Gloucester, Lord Grey, Marquis Lansdowne, and Lord Grenville (Mar. 20 and Apr. 20), and the planned composition and distribution of pamphlets describing the evils of the slave trade and advocating its abolition (Apr. 26 and Oct. 3). The letter of Apr. 26 suggests the establishment of a special board, sanctioned by the King, to see to the composition of such works. Other letters from this period are between Wilberforce and Harford. One letter of Oct. 12, 1814, speaks of French publications which favor abolition and mentions Chateaubriand, Humboldt, Sismondi, and Madame de Staël. It also tells of the Duke of Wellington, the King of France (Louis XVIII), Prince Talleyrand, and the English Prince Regent (later George IV) as being favorable to abolition. A letter of Nov. 23, 1814, continues to speak of abolition in the light of world events, and Wellington and Tallevrand's correspondence with him. One fragment of a strong letter, dated 1815, gives a graphic account of two slave ships. This letter also asks Harford to try to interest the Roman Catholic Church in banning the slave trade. Wilberforce also mentions trying to interest Sir Thomas Acland and Lord Castlereagh in making an attempt to interest the Pope in the abolition of the slave trade. In 1817, Wilberforce was bothered by the hostile pamphlets of one of his opponents, the anti-abolitionist Joseph Marryat. Wilberforce wrote to Harrison concerning this matter on Aug. 4, 1817, and discussed the urgency of having one of James Stephen's speeches in answer to Marryat printed and distributed as soon as possible. Wilberforce recognized the need for much printed material to educate the peoples of all countries, and especially the "unprincipled Frenchmen" (letter of Aug. 5, 1821), in support of abolition of slavery. A July 9, 1816, letter speaks of Zachary Macaulay; and a May 7, 1817, letter tells of a Macaulay letter falling into the hands of Joseph Marryat. Wilberforce also speaks bitterly of Marryat's attack on himself.

The collection also includes letters about conditions and religion in Ireland. A Sept. 8, 1812, letter asks Harford (during his bridal tour of Ireland) to try to ascertain the comparative moral effects of the Catholic and Protestant religions on the peasant and servant classes of Ireland. A Feb. 7, 1827, letter from Charles Forster to Harford tells of the efforts of the Church of England clergy to convert the Roman Catholics in Ireland.

These letters often mention charities, especially the Bible Society. A May 2, 1821, letter speaks of investigating and learning about colleges. Wilberforce speaks of the "experiment" in education being conducted by Harford. This is leading up to Harford's giving land and helping found St. David's College in South Wales in 1822. A Nov. 9, 1827, letter speaks of St. David's College. There is also an 1819 pamphlet for the "House of Protection for the Maintenance and Instruction of Girls of Good Character."

The collection also includes two volumes which record Wilberforce's account with the London banking house of Smith, Payne, and Smiths during 1829-1833. The itemized transactions provide details about his expenditures, including investments and benevolences.

Other topics discussed include the African Institute; agriculture; economic panic among farmers, 1830; the Corn Laws; American Friends; the Treaty of Amiens; the Army Training Bill; the Waterloo campaign; conditions in New South Wales, Australia; British relations with Austria, Brazil, France, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, the United States, and the Vatican; economic conditions in Austria; Baptists; Baptist missions in India; the Church of England in England, Ireland and other British colonies; patronage and tithes of the Church of England; the Methodist Church; the Moravians, the Church Missionary Society; the Church of Scotland; the Blagdon Affair; censorship of books; emigration to Canada; the Congress of Vienna; the coal trade; economic conditions in England and Scotland; education; St. David's College, South Wales; politics and government in England, France, Ireland, Jamaica, Sierra Leone, Trinidad, and Venezuela; elections; French colonies; free trade versus protection; the French Revolution; Greek Independence; Haiti; South Africa; the Society of Friends; labor; landlords and tenants; manufacturers in Scotland; the textile industry; the Royal Navy; Black officers in the Royal Navy; parliamentary reform; prisons; need to reform the penal code; the use of capital punishment; the poor laws and poor relief; Socinianism; the New Rupture Society; and personal matters, including Wilberforce's failing health.

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Collection contains largely correspondence received by Samuel Wilberforce relating primarily to missionary activities of the Church of England in East Africa and various British colonies and describing also scenery, local politics, and efforts to thwart the slave trade. Correspondents include John William Colenso, bishop of Natal; Christopher Palmer Rigby, British Army officer in Zanzibar; Charles Frederick Mackenzie, bishop of Central Africa; David Livingstone; Lord John Russell, British foreign secretary; Henry Labouchere, colonial secretary; Walter Chambers, missionary in Sarawak; Thomas Clarkson; Sir James Brooke, rajah of Sarawak; and Sir Samuel White Baker. Also includes some of Wiberforce's routine correspondence regarding appointments, meetings, and casual matters.

The majority of this collection consists of letters received by Samuel Wilberforce while he served as Bishop of Oxford, and tend to relate to missionary activities of the Church of England in East Africa and various British colonies in the mid-nineteenth century. Letters from the 1830s document Wilberforce’s role in coordinating the Society for Propagation of the Gospel with the Church Missionary Society. Additional correspondence from 1857 through 1864 describes other Anglican Church missions and clergy in Sarawak (Malaysia), Tasmania, New Zealand, and the West Indies. Notable correspondents include Sir James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak (whose memorandum dates from Apr. 2, 1860) and Sir Samuel White, whose letter from 1869 describes his expedition on the White Nile in Egypt and Sudan.

East Africa is the subject of several letters to Wilberforce between 1853 and 1863. Two letters from John William Colenso, Bishop of Natal, discuss the status of the Anglican Church in Natal, his attempts to acquire financial aid, the refusal of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel to provide aid for white residents, difficulties between Natal’s governor and his council, and injustices to the Kaffirs. A letter (dated Aug. 23, 1860) from Christopher Palmer Rigby, British veteran officer, describes economic and social conditions of Zanzibar, including the extent of the slave trade there and French activities on the island. Rigby also writes about the depopulation of the African coast due to slave expeditions, British naval actions against slavers, and recent ventures into the African interior. A batch of ten letters from Charles Frederick Mackenzie, Bishop of Central Africa, date between 1859 and 1861. Mackenzie’s letters describe the preparations for his trip to the Shire River region, his consecration of the mission in Cape Town, South Africa, and his work and discussions with Daniel Livingstone, who assisted in founding the mission in Nyasaland (Malawi). He describes their journey to the mission site, including Livingstone’s freeing of slaves they encountered being transported to markets, and also writes about relations between the local Manganja and Ajawa tribes.

The collection also includes contemporary copies of letters describing David Livingstone’s activities in the Zambezi River area, including a letter from Mar. 15, 1862, which describes Mackenzie’s destruction of a hostile village and his death from fever and dysentery. A related letter (unsigned) from Apr. 27, 1862, describes Mackenzie’s activities in the Shire region, as well as the political landscape between various tribes and the role of slave traders in fermenting war between various groups. A letter from Feb. 2, 1863, from British Foreign Secretary Lord John Russell informs Wilberforce that Livingstone’s expedition has been withdrawn from the mission.

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Single-page written, signed testimony by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed."

Single-page written testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman. Devised title; estimated location based on provenance.

"Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed."

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Susan Wicklund papers, 1970-2013 8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Dr. Susan Wicklund is a former abortion provider from Wisconsin. The papers chiefly document her professional career, centering on her work in the Midwest, where she operated abortion clinics in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin from the 1990s to 2013. Materials include many items of correspondence from patients, supporters, and opponents; files on national and local abortion rights and women's movement groups; articles and newspaper clippings; conference papers; materials related to anti-abortion groups; legal documents, including court case records; a recording of her 1992 "60 Minutes" television interview, and drafts of her book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007). A few clinic documents also exist in the form of leasing records, sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Susan Wicklund papers include personal correspondence and professional papers regarding her work as an abortion provider in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. Materials relate mostly to her work at Mountain Country Women's Clinic in Livingston, Montana in the 1990s, and include newspaper clippings, letters of support, patient reviews, donations, and administrative documents relating to the clinic in the form of sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks.

Materials relating to Wicklund's 1992 television interview on the "60 Minutes" program include a VHS tape of the interview, clippings, and many letters of support as well as hate mail.

The collection also contains materials related to anti-abortion groups and their harassment of Wicklund; these records also include legal documents referring to a related court case.

Also present in the collection are materials about various women's health organizations, support groups, conferences, and other clinics and centers, including Planned Parenthood, National Women's Organization, and the National Abortion Rights Action League. Drafts of Wicklund's book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007) are also in this collection.

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James Howard Whitty papers, 1792-1943 and undated 19 Linear Feet — Approx. 12,275 Items

Journalist, businessman, Poe scholar and editor, and an avid collector of Poe memorabilia; resided in Richmond, Virginia. The James Howard Whitty papers include letters, drafts of books and articles, research notes, newspaper clippings, and other papers, all relating to Whitty's writings on Edgar Allan Poe's life and career, his editorship of Poe's poetry, and his relationship with other literary scholars. The numerous clippings are found both loose and mounted in three scrapbooks. There is also a manuscript volume containing a Richmond, Virginia book seller's accounts. Other research materials on Poe consist of transcripts of Poe's letters and over 600 images related to Poe's life. There is voluminous correspondence from Poe scholars and other literary critics, including George Woodberry, Mary E. Phillips, and Thomas O. Mabbott. Whitty's research papers also contain copies of letters from John C. Frémont to Joel Poinsett in 1838, research material and correspondence relating to Virginia planter and early Congressman John Randolph of Roanoke, and the history of Richmond, Virginia.

Papers of James Howard Whitty, author and authority on the life and work of Edgar Allan Poe, are chiefly comprised of correspondence, research writings and notes, printed material such as clippings and engravings, and copies of 19th century correspondence, all relating to Whitty's writings on literary figures and Virginia history.

Whitty's research materials on Edgar Allen Poe include copies of a large number of letters by Edgar Allan Poe and members of his family; documents concerning the events surrounding Poe's death; a large amount of correspondence with other Poe scholars, particularly George E. Woodberry, Mary E. Phillips, and Thomas Ollive Mabbott; and research notes made by Whitty, including material for a complete Poe bibliography, and rough drafts of Whitty's writings on Poe. There are also over 600 images, chiefly engravings, including portraits of Poe and his family, images of the places where Poe lived, and the museums and shrines dedicated to him. In addition, there are letters relating to Whitty's work as organizer and first president of the Edgar Allan Poe shrine in Richmond, Virginia, and to Whitty's quarrel with the directors of the shrine in 1924.

The hundreds of clippings included in this collection consist of what seems to be almost every article or mention of Poe from 1900-1935. Many of the articles are in duplicate and many of them contain notations by Whitty. There are also three scrapbooks of clippings.

Other materials center on Whitty's interest in the history of Richmond, Virginia; business correspondence pertaining to Whitty's work on the staff of the Richmond Times; notes on and copies of correspondence of John Randolph of Roanoke, 1814-1816 (Virginia planter and Congressman) to Ann Morris, in which he accuses her of being a common prostitute and the murderess of her child and of his brother. Copies of her answers to his accusations are also included. Whitty was interested in writing on John Randolph of Roanoke, but apparently never did so. Additional research materials include notes on and copies of letters from John Charles Frémont to Joel R. Poinsett, 1838; and other printed material, including reviews, copies of sections of books, publication notices, and advertisements. There is also a manuscript volume containing the accounts of a Richmond bookseller, 1929-1936.

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Collection includes correspondence separated into two subseries: "Letters To or About Walt Whitman," and "Letters From or By Walt Whitman." Most of Whitman's letters in the collection were written between 1880 and 1891. Letters include those written to and from friends, family members, editors, publishers, and soldiers Whitman met in and around Washington, D. C. during the Civil War. The Clippings Series includes both large groups of clippings collected and annotated by Whitman, and clippings Whitman took from complete or nearly complete articles. Also included are manuscripts and printed materials about or relating to Whitman, most of which date during Whitman's lifetime. There are portraits, etchings, engravings, and sketches both of Whitman and of his brother, George, and sister, Hannah. A Writings Series contains manuscript and printed versions of poetry and prose dating from Whitman's career in journalism up to the end of his life. It is divided into four subseries: Manuscript Poems (1855-1882 and undated); Manuscript Prose (1852-1891 and undated); Proofs (1874-1891 and undated); and Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman (1841-1891).

The Walt Whitman papers incorporates material spanning the dates 1841-1940, with the bulk of the material dating from 1841-1891. The virtual reorganization of the collection, based upon that devised by Ellen F. Frey in A Bibliography of Walt Whitman (Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1945), divides it into six series: Correspondence, Writings, Clippings, Material About or Relating to Whitman, Portraits, and Miscellany.

Items marked as unavailable are currently missing.

Correspondence is separated into two subseries: "Letters To or About Walt Whitman," and "Letters From or By Walt Whitman." Most of Whitman's letters in the collection were written between 1880 and 1891. The Clippings Series lists both large groups of clippings collected and annotated by Whitman, and clippings Whitman took from complete or nearly complete articles. Whenever possible, these have been dated according to the periodical in which the articles originally appeared. Material About or Relating to Whitman is comprised of subseries that catalog manuscript versions of Richard Maurice Bucke's biography of Whitman, as well as other manuscript material written by Whitman or recorded by his friends. The Portraits Series includes formal photographic and painted portraits, etchings, engravings, and sketches, both of Whitman and of his brother, George, and sister, Hannah. The Miscellany consists of ephemera related to Whitman's life and career as a poet. Two scrapbooks, book wrappers for the first edition of Leaves of Grass, and documents relating to the Whitman fund are listed among this series' eclectic contents.

By far the largest series in the collection, the Writings Series contains manuscript and printed versions of poetry and prose dating from Whitman's career in journalism to the end of his life. It is divided into four subseries: Manuscript Poems (1855-1882 and undated); Manuscript Prose (1852-1891 and undated); Proofs (1874-1891 and undated); and Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman (1841-1891). The first subseries, "Manuscript Poems," is further subdivided into categories intended to define three separate levels of poetic composition: manuscript versions of poems that appear in at least one edition of Leaves of Grass, manuscript versions of poems not published in Leaves of Grass, and verse fragments and outlines. The researcher is advised to consult the NYU Collected Writings of Walt Whitman, particularly Harold W. Blodgett and Sculley Bradley, eds., Leaves of Grass: A Comprehensive Reader's Edition (New York: NYUP, 1965), pp. 585-706, for publication of previously uncollected material. Although older, Oscar Lovell Triggs, ed., Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman, vol. 3 of 10 (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1902) and Clarence Gohdes and Rollo G. Silver, eds., Faint Clews and Indirections: Manuscripts of Walt Whitman and His Family (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1949) are also helpful, the former particularly when used alongside Frey's Bibliography.

The Manuscript Prose Subseries in the Writings Series is further divided into seven categories. The first three are comprised of manuscript versions of stories, prefaces, and essays and lectures, respectively. Four less distinct subheadings follow. "Notes on Literature" represents an almost exact transliteration of Frey's category of the same name, however it should be noted that this category does not, at the time of writing, list all of Trent's holdings in Whitman's literary-critical manuscripts. Some literary criticism is contained in "Autobiographical Manuscripts" and "Whitman on His Own Writings," along with more purely impressionistic self-reflection. "Miscellany" should also be consulted, as it brings together in an unsystematic way Whitman's notes on travel, reading, and education as well as a scattering of notes on poetry and different forms of literary production.

The last two subseries of the Writings Series bring together various published versions of Whitman's writing. Annotated proofs of his poetry and prose are identified in the finding aid, and cross-references are included between the Proofs Subseries and the Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman Subseries in instances where the collection lists both a proof and a published version of a poem or article among its headings. The Periodicals Containing Contributions by Whitman Subseries provides a survey of his writing during his lifetime.

Many published works by and about Walt Whitman and housed in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library have been cataloged individually. These can be found by searching the Duke online catalog.

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Dorothy Whitlock papers, 1948-1989 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 300 Items

Occupational therapist and medical illustrator active in Utah and North Carolina. The Dorothy Whitlock Papers span the dates 1948-1989 and derive from Whitlock's work as an occupational therapist and medical illustrator. The collection contains visual materials which include image files and loose images of medical illustrations in a variety of media, including but not limited to watercolor, graphite pencil, brushed graphite paint, pen and ink drawings, photographs of etchings, and photographs. The images include but are not limited to portrayals of various medical procedures, conditions, techniques, and tools. The collection also contains papers related to Whitlock's time as an occupational therapist at the Veterans' Administration Hospital in Oteen, North Carolina, and papers related to her interest in and work on tuberculosis. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Dorothy Whitlock Papers span the dates 1948-1989 and derive from Whitlock's work as an occupational therapist and medical illustrator. The collection contains visual materials which include image files and loose images of medical illustrations in a variety of media, including but not limited to watercolor, graphite pencil, brushed graphite paint, pen and ink drawings, photographs of etchings, and photographs. The images include but are not limited to portrayals of various medical procedures, conditions, techniques, and tools. The collection also contains notebooks created during Whitlock's time at the Veterans' Administration Hospital in Oteen, North Carolina, where she practiced as an occupational therapist.

Additional items include professional materials, including professional files and loose professional materials containing undated in-service notes on tuberculosis, notes and papers from the National Tuberculosis Association's conferences in 1948, 1950, 1951, and 1952 in Salt Lake City, Utah, planning materials for an occupational therapy convention in Glenwood Spring, Colorado in 1950, including correspondence and papers, and additional loose notes relating to Whitlock's work.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Lyman Whiting papers, 1713-1955 1.5 Linear Feet — 310 Items

Whiting was a Massachusetts clergyman. The collection consists of materials documenting Whiting's professional life as a Congregational minister.

Collection consists of materials documenting his professional life as a Congregational minister. Records in the collection outline his career, name apointments, offices held, publications, and nominations received. There is also personal correspondence, a 1713 will, a letter from B.B. Edwards, some genealogical information, and a narrative that appears to be his description of his sensations shortly before his death.

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John Whitford papers, 1829-1921 3 Linear Feet — 1011 Items

Planter, Confederate Army officer, and North Carolina state senator. Correspondence, tax books, military order book, postwar plantation records, and legal papers relating to Whitford's planting activities before and after the Civil War, his service as a colonel in the 67th Regiment of North Carolina Troops, and his position as state senator. Includes Whitford family letters and papers.

This collection contains the papers of John N. Whitford, commander of the 67th North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War, cotton planter, and state senator. The collection includes contracts for the hire of slaves in the 1850s; reports of Mary E. Williamson and Caroline Williamson at school in Oxford, North Carolina; accounts of F. T. Williamson, Mary E. Williamson, and Caroline Williamson with their guardian, William Foy; fire insurance policies; papers relating to suits involving John N. Whitford; miscellaneous military papers, for the most part related to the service of John N. Whitford in the Confederate Army; contracts between Whitford and freedmen; a letter to Whitford from a former slave; miscellaneous land surveys and papers related to land transactions, household accounts, bills and receipts, and legal papers; handbills for Whitford's campaign for the state senate in 1888; papers and letters related to the breeding of horses; tax lists for the lower Black River district, New Hanover County, North Carolina; records of tax delinquents; and the wills of John N. Whitford and Mary E. (Williamson) Whitford. Volumes include a tax book for New Bern, North Carolina, 1856; account books; and memorandum books. One of the memoranda books contains general orders of John N. Whitford as the col. of the 67th Regt. of N.C. Troops and post-Civil War plantation records of John N. and Harry Whitford. There is printed material on the Farmers' Alliance in North Carolina and Virginia, the Knights of Honor, and the Royal Arcanum.

One notable letter written by one of Whitford's freed slaves describes his condition and asks for a certificate of ownership for a horse, because some soldiers were trying to confiscate his property (Oct. 8, 1864).

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Wendel White photographs, 2009-2019 4.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 75 photographic prints — 24x30 and 24x42 inches

Wendel White is a photographer and Distinguished Professor of Art at Stockton University in New Jersey. This photograph collection comprises two bodies of work by White that explore aspects of African American history through artifacts, archives, and 21st century landscapes. The first, "Manifest," comprises 45 24x30 inch color inkjet photographs of single objects relating to African American material culture and history, taken by White in various public and private collections throughout the U.S. Subjects in these stark images include a diary, printed notices, slavery narratives, a lock of Frederick Douglass's hair, a drum, a slave collar, a tobacco pouch, a tintype photograph, and other objects. "Manifest" is the 2015 winner of the Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. The second portfolio, "Red Summer," refers to race-related violence against African Americans that took place from 1912 to 1923, with the majority occurring during the summer of 1919. It consists of 30 24x42 inch color photographs, taken by White from 2017 to 2018, at sites across the United States where violence against African Americans - assaults, riots, and lynchings - took place, paired with contemporaneous newspaper accounts of the events. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Wendel White photographs collection consists of two bodies of work that explore aspects of African American history through images of artifacts, historical printed pieces and manuscripts, and 21st century landscapes.

The first, "Manifest," comprises 45 24x30 inch color inkjet photographs of single objects relating to African American material culture and history, taken by White in various public and private collections throughout the U.S. Subjects in these stark images include a diary, printed notices, slavery narratives, a lock of Frederick Douglass's hair, a drum, a slave collar, a tobacco pouch, a tintype photograph, and other objects. "Manifest" is the 2015 winner of the Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Color.

The second portfolio, "Red Summer," refers to race-related violence against African Americans that took place from 1912 to 1923, with the majority occurring during the summer of 1919. It consists of 30 24x42 inch color photographs, taken from 2017 to 2018, of the sites across the United States where violence against African Americans - assaults, riots, lynchings - took place, paired with contemporaneous newspaper accounts of the events.

The photographer notes: "Several projects that have occupied my attention during the past two decades are, in retrospect, part of a broader effort to seek out the ghosts that continue to haunt the remnants of the past." The full artist's statements on "Manifest" and "Red Summer" are included in the series descriptions for those projects.

A photobook based on the "Manifest" project was published in 2014 by Chroma (California Institute of Integral Studies) as Manifest. Images from both projects have been exhibited in institutions across the U.S.

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Robert White collection of Chinese Cultural Revolution materials, 1920s-2000s and undated 15 Linear Feet — 2 flat boxes; 10 trays; 2 document cases; 1 tube; 2 custom boxes

Robert White is an Appalachian State University professor who studied and taught in China during the 1980s and 1990s. The collection contains pins, posters, objects, textiles, and printed material, largely produced for a Chinese audience, promoting the ideals and persona of Mao Zedong, the establishment of the People's Republic of China, and the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-1976).

Collection consists of posters, pins, buttons, flags, printed materials and publications (including Little Red Books), objects and ephemera, most featuring representations of Mao, acquired by White in the 1980s while he participated in academic exchanges with China during his research at Appalachian State University and Duke University. Most of the materials were created and printed in China and intended for the Chinese public. A small number of printed items were intended for an American or global audience, printed in English by the government's Foreign Languages Press. The majority of items were produced during the Cultural Revolution period, and celebrate or promote the ideals and persona of Mao Zedong. Other themes or events idealized in this collection include the creation of political collectives around the country; the establishment of the Red Guard; army service; atomic power; traditional farming; the Down to the Countryside Movement; the Foolish Old Man fable; and other political events and personas within the Chinese Communist Party during the mid-twentieth century. Other noteable references include the Three Red Banners; the Sixteen Points program; the Red Guards' eight mass rallies in Tiananmen Square in Beijing during 1966; Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-tung (also known as the Little Red Book); and community performances, particularly the 8 Model Plays. Mao is prominently featured on the majority of the posters; another notable figure is Lin Biao. Other figures represented include Mao's wife Jiang Qing, exiled Cambodian king Norodom Sihanouk, as well as pre-Cultural Revolution leaders Liu Shaoqi, Zhou Enlai, and Hua Guofeng.