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John Buettner-Janusch Letters and Clippings, 1979-1992 and undated 0.25 Linear Feet

John Buettner-Janusch was a professor at Duke University in the 1960s who was convicted of manufacturing illegal drugs in his New York University laboratory in the 1970s and of sending poisoned candy to a New York judge and another Duke professor in 1987.

The John Buettner-Janusch Papers consist of letters written by Buettner-Janusch while in prison, primarily from 1987-1992, as well as clippings on his chargings and convictions. Several letters are addressed to "Annie and Will", although many letters are missing the first page or are not addressed, and many are undated. Most are handwritten. Many of the letters relate stories of Buettner-Janusch's research trips to Madagascar. Also included are clippings that detail accusations against him related to the manufacture of illegal drugs at NYU as well as the poisoned candy sent to Judge Brieant in 1987, and his obituary from the New York Times in 1992.

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Mel Shimm Papers, 1954-1990 3.0 Linear Feet

Mel Shimm was a professor of law and Associate Dean at the Duke Law School. The Mel Shimm papers include materials from Mel Shimm's time as a faculty member at Duke Law School. Included are class materials such as exams and readings, correspondence, committee materials, and other materials.

The Mel Shimm papers include materials from Mel Shimm's time as a faculty member at Duke Law School. Included are class materials such as exams and readings, correspondence, committee materials, and other materials.

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Frances D. Acomb papers, 1953 - 1975 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Frances D. Acomb (1907-1984) served as a professor of history at Duke University from 1945 to 1975. She specialized in French history. The Acomb papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan; as well as the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors, the American Association of University Women, and other professional organizations. English.

The papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of modern European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan. Acomb's memberships in the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors and the American Association of University Women are documented through minutes and other materials.

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John W. Alspaugh papers, 1875 - 1898 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

John Wesley Alspaugh was a lawyer, editor, and civic leader in Winston-Salem, N.C. A key supporter of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C), he served as chairman of the Board of Trustees and as a member of the Committee of Management, which ran the school from 1884 to 1887. Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management. English.

The John W. Alspaugh Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management.

The letters of the other two members of the Committee of Management, Julian S. Carr and James A. Gray, concern the finances of Trinity during the critical struggle for the institution's survival, when many pledges to an endowment fund were unpaid. Notes signed by the Committee of Management had to be met, speakers approved, scholarships considered, teachers employed, insurance paid, meetings arranged, and reports prepared, among other business.

In 1886, the question of employing Dr. John B. Bobbitt as collection agent for Trinity was debated. The quest for funds was hampered by the impossibility of collecting a loan to Charles L. Heitman. Meanwhile, the executor of the estate of Braxton Craven was pressing for settlement of debts owed by the college.

With the arrival of President John Franklin Crowell in 1887, the Alspaugh correspondence diminishes, although he remained as chairman of the Board of Trustees for many years. Still haunting the Trustees was the debt against Mrs. Craven for the college bells. John B. Bobbitt was trying to secure payment for his services as a collector of notes pledged to Trinity. In 1889, S. L. Leary of Charlotte, N.C. offered his services as an architect for the new buildings needed when the college considered moving to Raleigh, N.C.

Two broadsides, dated 1884 and 1886, contain reports of the Committee of Management of Trinity College. Also included is the annual report made by Chairman of the Faculty William H. Pegram to the President and Board of Trustees of Trinity College.

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863-1961 13.25 Linear Feet

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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Katharine M. Banham papers, 1910-1995 26 Linear Feet — 20,000 Items

Katharine May Banham (1897-1995) served as a professor in the Department of Psychology at Duke University from 1946 to 1967, specializing in child psychology and development. Papers include correspondence, writings, speeches, case files and research notes, teaching materials, diaries, memorabilia, photographs, and oral history interviews of Katharine M. Banham, relating to her work in the field of psychology and her contributions to Duke University, Durham, and North Carolina. Prominent subjects include psychological experimentation, child psychology, geriatrics and gerontology, human social and emotional development, children with cerebral palsy, the Woman's College, Duke Preschool, Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, the North Carolina Psychological Association, the Durham Child Guidance Clinic, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. English.

The Katharine May Banham Papers span the years between 1910 and 1995, with the bulk occurring between 1945 and 1984. These papers include her master's theses and dissertation work, professional and academic writings, case files, and data documenting psychological experiments that culminated in the development of tests, as well as research articles and one monograph; transcripts of talks and addresses; translations of French psychological texts, teaching materials; administrative records of and records documenting her role in various civic and academic clubs and organizations; professional and personal correspondence; and personal materials including art, photographs, memorabilia, poetry and other personal writings, diaries, biographical information, legal documents, and tapes and transcripts of an oral history interview done in 1980. The main subject areas include Banham's contribution to the profession, her participation in the Duke community, and the Durham community as well as regional, national, and international communities and agencies.

The collection chiefly reflects Banham's career as a woman psychologist during a period when there was little support for women in professional or academic careers. The papers document Banham's research and teaching in three countries; her contributions in the areas of child psychology and geriatrics, particularly human social and emotional development; functioning and development of children with cerebral palsy and disabilities; the history and especially the development of psychological testing of children and adults; and parapsychological phenomena. Research and teaching materials are located within the Academic and Professional Psychology series and Duke Activities series. Materials relevant to Banham's professional development are scattered throughout all five series.

The collection is also important for the perspective it offers on the Duke University Psychology Department and the Woman's College during the 1940s to the 1960s. Information related to both as well as her role in the Admissions and scholarships Committees among other faculty committees (see the folder list located in the description of Duke Activities series), the Duke Preschool, the Duke Film Society, and the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement can be found primarily in the Duke Activities series. Material regarding the development and teaching of an infant and child psychology curriculum and a series of correspondence with graduate students are also of special interest and can be found in the Duke Activities series. Other materials relating to her contributions to the Duke Community are located in the Academic and Professional Psychology series, the Correspondence series, and the Personal Files series.

Banham's contribution to the city of Durham is reflected in the Agency and Club Participation series with the most in depth materials relating to her role in establishing the French Club, the Photographic Arts Society, the Altrusa Club, and the Committee for Successful Aging (which became the Golden Age Society and finally, the Coordinating Council for Senior Citizens), and, to a lesser degree, in the Academic and Professional Psychology series specifically in her role as one of the founding psychologists of the Durham Child Guidance Clinic. Banham co-founded the North Carolina Psychological Association in addition to being an active member and officer of other regional, national, and international organizations such as the League of Women Voters, the American Association of University Women, and the International Council of Women Psychologists.

Banham's life was defined by her professional and academic commitments and so her closest relationships were with her colleagues and the many individuals to whom she gave her time and the benefit of her professional skills. The Correspondence and personal series best reflect her tireless efforts on behalf of the people with whom she come into contact. Her papers are particularly useful as they document the period of the 1920s through the 1960s in England, Canada, and especially the United States from the perspective of a highly educated, professional woman.

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James David Barber Scrapbook, 1939-1996 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 Item

James David Barber was a Political Science professor at Duke from 1972-1995. The scrapbook includes news clippings, correspondence, family photographs and childhood memories from the years roughly 1939-1996.

Entitled "My Life," the scrapbook contains nine sections: My Main Vita, My Books, Professors Blessing Me, My Early Life, My Teaching, My Work to Help Duke University, My Coming Forth for Politics, Some Things I Have Done for Humans, and Pictures. It reflects Professor Barber's work as an educator, author and activist. A substantial portion of the scrapbook contains letters from Barber's former students at Duke. In these letters, the students evaluated Barber's courses in political science. Also included are typescripts of Barber's "What Duke Can Be" and "Duke's Constitution," letters to Barber upon his retirement from Duke and family pictures.

This scrapbook is a xerox copy made by James David Barber in 1996 (includes color scans). The original remains with his family.

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John Spencer Bassett collection, 1802 - 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) 1 Linear Foot — 250 Items

John Spencer Bassett, a professor in the History Department of Trinity College from 1893-1906, was a renowned educator and advocate of freedom of expression. A native of North Carolina, Bassett received his A.B. from Trinity College in 1888 and his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University in 1894. He returned to Trinity College to teach and was active in teaching, writing and collecting southern Americana. Bassett began publication of an annual series of Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society; founded the honorary society 9019, a precursor to Phi Beta Kappa; founded and edited the scholarly journal, the South Atlantic Quarterly; and encouraged his students to publish and fostered their interests in Southern history. In 1903, Bassett published an article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy in the South Atlantic Quarterly, that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. Bassett's views brought on a controversy that became known as the Bassett Affair that helped to establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States. The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. English.

The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. The correspondence (1893-1917) includes a copy of a 1911 letter to Charles Frances Adams in which Bassett gives his account of the Bassett Affair. Other correspondents include Oswald G. Villard, William Kenneth Boyd, Edwin Mims, and William E. Dodd. Much of the original correspondence concerns affairs of the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association. Clippings ([1802]-1896) include articles about North Carolina politics, Civil War history, the Bassett Affair, Trinity College matters, race relations, the media, and education. The manuscripts include the autobiography of Jessie Lewellin Bassett, wife of John Spencer Bassett, in which she describes her life from 1866 until her marriage to Bassett in 1892; a copy of the paper, "How to Collect and Preserve Historical Material," that Bassett presented to the State Historical Association on Oct. 23, 1900; and John L. Woodward's Ph.B. thesis, "Causes and Progress of the Revolutionary Movement in North Carolina," (1894).

The bulk of John Spencer Bassett's personal papers can be found in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress.

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Paull Franklin Baum papers, 1928-1989 0.2 Linear Feet — 125 Items

Dr. Paull F. Baum was a James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University from 1922 until his retirement in 1955. He was an internationally famed scholar in the field of medieval and Victorian studies and was considered an authority in the principles of English versification and the works of Chaucer, Rossetti, Tennyson and Matthew Arnold. The collection includes correspondence, a manuscript, clippings, research material and book reviews by or to Dr. Baum. It ranges in date from 1928-1989.

Contains correspondence, a manuscript, clippings, research material and book reviews by or to Dr. Baum. The correspondence includes two letters from Mrs. Helen Rossetti Angeli, daughter of William M. Rossetti, and Archibald Henderson. The latter's letter is in response to Baum's review of his biography of George Bernard Shaw. Henderson makes an interesting statement about Shaw's opposition to much that he included in the biography, especially two chapters which Shaw tried unsuccessfully to persuade Henderson to leave out of the book. Dates range from 1928-1989.

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Charles A. Baylis papers, 1924-1973 4.5 Linear Feet — 3600 Items

Charles A. Baylis was a professor of philosophy at Duke University from 1952-1970. This collection contains the correspondence, writings, personal papers, and departmental records. The material ranges in date from 1924-1973, bulk from 1950-1970.

This collection is organized into two series, correspondence and personal papers, and covers the years from 1924 to 1973. The bulk of the material is personal correspondence between Baylis and colleagues at other universities. Other material includes papers relating to groups and organizations that Baylis belonged to, course exams and syllabi, and essays he wrote. Notable in this collection is Baylis' Masters Thesis (1924) and a tenure case involving a colleague at the University of Washington (1948).

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Waldo Beach papers, 1949-1986 0.7 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Waldo Beach was a professor of Christian Ethics in the Duke University Divinity School between the years 1946-1986. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, typescripts and printed material concerning civil rights, politics and other ethical issues and ranges in date from 1949-1986.

Collection includes correspondence, memoranda, typescripts and printed material primarily concerning ethics. Major subjects include civil rights and research in politics and ethics. Individual files include a proposal to the Danforth Foundation to improve teaching, correspondence concerning residential development in Duke Forest, conferences on Human Values and Public Policy, and cooperative research in the areas of politics and ethics. Items of note include a copy of an undated typescript, "A President Named Jimmy", by James D. Barber, a pamphlet produced by the Durham Community Planning Council titled "Durham's Assets in the Arts", and first-hand accounts of the January 3, 1964 sit-in in Chapel Hill. The collection ranges in date from 1949-1986.

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Helen S. Bevington papers, 1965-1976 1.7 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Helen S. Bevington was a poet and taught in the Dept. of English at Duke University from 1943-1976. The collection includes page and galley proofs and typescripts. It ranges in date from 1965-1976.

The collection contains page and galley proofs as well as typescripts for five of Bevington's published works. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1976.

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Lucius A. Bigelow papers, 1915-1973 2 Linear Feet

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Lucius A. Bigelow (1892-1973) served as a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University from 1929 to 1961. Papers of Lucius A. Bigelow include correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs during his career as a professor of chemistry at Brown University and Duke University. Major subjects within the papers are fluorine chemistry, organic chemistry, chemistry education, and research conducted for the Manhattan Project, the Office of Naval Research, and the Army Research Office. Professional correspondents include H. S. Booth, Henry Gilman, and William A. Noyes. English.

Records produced by Lucius A. Bigelow throughout his career as a professor of chemistry both at Brown University and Duke University. Materials are present from 1915 to 1973. The bulk of the records consist of correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs. The majority of the material pertains to Bigelow's time at Duke University however, there is some material stemming from his tenure at Brown University.

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Hugo Leander Blomquist papers, 1912-2000, bulk 1917-1964. 6.0 Linear Feet

Hugo Leander Blomquist was professor and chair of the Botany Department at Duke University from 1921-1957. The collection includes correspondence between H.L. Blomquist and his wife Margaret during the 1920s and during H.L. Blomquist's service in the Army during World War I, class notes, North Carolina maps, as well as drawings and photographs of his book The Grasses of North Carolina. The collection ranges in date from 1912-2000.

Collection contains personal and professional correspondence of Hugo L. Blomquist from the years 1912 to 1961. Correspondence includes letters to his brother during Blomquist's service in the Army during World War I as well as correspondence between H.L. Blomquist and his wife Margaret Mordecai Blomquist before and after their marriage. Also includes materials related to Blomquist's time in the Army, citizenship process, maps, notes, and oversize illustrations and photographs associated with the publication of his book Grasses of North Carolina. Illustrations were removed from acidic paper wrapping and boxed for preservation.

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W. Bryan Bolich papers, 1891-1972 5 Linear Feet — 5,000 Items

W. Bryan Bolich (1896-1977) served as a Professor of Law at Duke University from 1927 to 1966. Papers contain family memorabilia, general correspondence, photographs, an oral history, diaries, course notes, writings, drafts of statutes revisions, and clippings. Major subjects include family work at Southern Railway in Forsyth County, N.C., Duke Law School curriculum development and reorganization, Law Day, the Rhodes Scholarship, Trinity College Class of 1917 alumni activities, Law School Alumni Association, North Carolina House of Representatives, and property and alien rights laws authored with the North Carolina General Statute Commission.

Correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, diaries, certificates, correspondence and drafts of laws, miscellaneous memorabilia from Bolich's career as a Professor at Duke University Law School, student notebooks from courses taken at Trinity College and University of Oxford, and a taped memoir and 19-page transcription. Family materials include materials from Southern Railway and much correspondence between Bolich's parents during their courtship (ca 1891-1893). Political correspondence between Bolich and Richard Nixon is filed in Series 3 (Correspondence. Political).

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Allan H. Bone papers, 1944 - 1989 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Allan H. Bone (1917-1992) spent nearly forty years in the Duke University Department of Music. He served as professor of music, chair of the department, and conductor of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners. English.

The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners.

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Frank L. Borchardt papers, 1971-1997 28 Linear Feet

Personal and professional papers. Some subjects include: Calis (computer aided language instruction); Calico presentations and manuals; NSA contracts and proposals; German Department administrative materials; Duke Language Tool kit.
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William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

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Charles K. Bradsher papers, 1951-1997 1.8 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Charles Kilgo Bradsher was a Class of 1933 Duke alum and a Duke professor in the Chemistry Department from 1939-1979. His collection includes personal and departmental materials, especially concerning the Chemistry Department, the Gross-Edens Affair.

Collection includes personal and departmental materials concerning the history and faculty of the Department of Chemistry and the teaching of chemistry, the Gross-Edens Affair, long range planning, and research. Contains correspondence with Paul Gross concerning the Gross-Edens affair and documents regarding faculty promotions which should remain confidential. Replaced folder labels and discarded packet of departmental receipts for processing.

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John S. Bradway papers, 1914-1991 60 Linear Feet — 0.03 Gigabytes

Papers of John S. Bradway, lawyer, legal aid advocate, and educator. Bradway's primary interest and work was in the field of legal aid. He served as Secretary of the National Association of Legal Aid Organizations (NALAO) from 1922-1940, and as its President from 1940-1942. While at Duke University, Bradway founded and directed the Duke Legal Aid Clinic from 1931 until 1959. The bulk of the collection reflects Bradway's role as Secretary for the National Association of Legal Aid Organizations (NALAO). Some materials were gathered by John Lindsey, a colleague and friend of Bradway's, and include writings, teaching materials, and some correspondence. Materials include correspondence with various state and city legal aid bureaus, detailed statistics and annual reports from these organizations, correspondence with various national social service and aid agencies such as the National Conference on Social Work, and NALAO committee reports and conference proceedings. Also included are chapter files of his books, addresses, and articles written by Bradway on topics relating to legal aid.

The bulk of the collection reflects the work of John S. Bradway in his role as Secretary for the National Association of Legal Aid Organizations (NALAO). Materials include correspondence with various state and city legal aid bureaus, detailed statistics and annual reports from these organizations, correspondence with various national social service and aid agencies such as the National Conference on Social Work, and NALAO committee reports and conference proceedings. Also included are chapter files of his books, addresses, and articles written by Bradway on topics relating to legal aid. Duke Legal Aid Clinic (DLAC) materials are also present.

Bound volumes include correspondence, pamphlets, reports, and other materials related to John Bradway's work with NALAO which have been bound together into volumes. These series of volumes were numbered, and are incomplete.

Accession UA2017.0063 was gathered by John M. Lindsey, a friend and colleague of John Bradway, and includes copies of writings and teaching materials created by Bradway, as well as some correspondence and materials related to Bradway's death.

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John S. Bradway correspondence with Richard M. Nixon, 1959-1978 0.5 Linear Feet

John S. Bradway was a professor to Richard Nixon while he was a student at Duke Law School in the 1930s. The collection consists of letters, telegrams, and cards sent to and from Richard Nixon prior to his 1968 election, during his presidency and subsequent impeachment, and following his resignation in 1974 during his second term in office. Topics in the correspondence include the Vietnam War, political protests, Nixon's coverage in the press, his impeachment trial, and his book.

The collection consists of carbon copies of letters Bradway sent to Nixon, and letters, telegrams, and cards from Richard Nixon prior to his 1968 election, during his presidency and subsequent impeachment, and following his resignation in 1974 during his second term in office. Topics in the correspondence include the Vietnam War, political protests, Nixon's coverage in the press, his impeachment trial, and his book. Also included is correspondence between Bradway and President Gerald Ford.

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B. Harvie Branscomb papers, 1922-1952 0.5 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Branscomb became a member of the Library Council in 1928 and served as Director of the Duke University Library from 1934 to 1941. Collection contains library reports, collection information, and correspondence to and from B. Harvie Branscomb.
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Joseph P. Breedlove papers, 1913-1950 2 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Breedlove was appointed Librarian of Trinity College in 1898 and oversaw the growth of the libraries after Trinity expanded to become Duke University. He served as Librarian until 1939 when he was named Librarian Emeritus. The Joseph P. Breedlove papers document the expansion and management of the Duke University Library after the General Library opens in 1930. The papers contain some annual reports of the Trinity College as well as an undated Guide to the Trinity College Library. Correspondence with Library Council member B. Harvie Branscomb includes a June 14, 1937 feasibility report of the resources needed to convert the Library classification scheme from Dewey Decimal to Library of Congress. The collection also includes a history of Wiley Gray medal with a list of winners.

The bulk of the Breedlove papers document the expansion and management of the Library after the General Library opens in 1930. Some annual reports from the Trinity College era can be found in Box 1 and an undated Guide to the Trinity College Library is located in Box 3. Box 3 also contains speeches and articles by Breedlove as well as a report on library instruction for freshmen. Of particular interest is a folder in Box 1 containing Breedlove's correspondence with B. Harvie Branscomb. Branscomb was a member of the Library Council and served as Director of Libraries (a faculty appointment) from 1934 to 1941. A June 14, 1937 feasibility report of the resources needed to convert the Library classification scheme from Dewey Decimal to Library of Congress can be found in the Branscomb folder. In addition to materials about the Library, the collection also includes documentation of Breedlove's campus activities with the Trinity Class of 1898 and a history of Wiley Gray medal with a list of winners.

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Roberta Florence Brinkley papers, 1933-1962 1.7 Linear Feet — 1,750 Items

Educator and administrator Roberta Florence Brinkley was professor of English and Dean of the Woman's College at Duke University from 1947 until 1962. Collection contains manuscript materials, correspondence, class notes, memoranda, and other papers. The bulk consists of notes, drafts and a typescript of the unpublished Milton's Poems Adapted for Music, and related materials on the relationship of music and other arts, including the various versions and adaptations of Paradise Lost.

Collection contains manuscript materials, correspondence, class notes, memoranda, and other papers. The bulk consists of notes, drafts and a typescript of the unpublished Milton's Poems Adapted for Music, and related materials on the relationship of music and other arts, including the various versions and adaptations of Paradise Lost. The remaining papers consist of notes for Dr. Brinkley's classes on English poetry, a typescript, memos, and correspondence concerning her activities with Duke University Church, and materials concerning art development at Duke. A copy of her eulogy, written by Dean Ellen Gobbel and Miriam Warren was added to the collection.

The manuscript of Milton's Poems Adapted for Music is on loan and is available for consultation but cannot be released without the permission of S.G. Brinkley.

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A. S. Brower papers, 1939-1958 9.2 Linear Feet — approx. 5,300 Items

Brower served Duke University in the roles of Administrative Assistant, Comptroller/Business Manager and Treasurer from 1937-1962. Included in the collection are files from Brower's service to the North Carolina State Board of Education, Medical Service Association, Civil Pilot Training Program, U. S. Office of Scientific Research and Development and Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1939-1958.

The collection is divided into seven series: State Board of Education, Civil Pilot Training Program, Medical Service Association, U. S. Office of Scientific Research and Development, Duke Chapel Crypt and Oversize. The bulk of the collection pertains to the State Board of Education and the Civil Pilot Training Program and the types of materials include correspondence, reports, minutes, financial records, printed material, and photographs. Of note is the signed correspondence from architect Julian Abele in the Duke Chapel Crypt series.

Some of the paper is brittle and should be handled with care. A previous staff member attempted to remove staples from some of the material, resulting in tearing. They should also be handled with care.

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Frank C. Brown papers, 1899-1943 30 Linear Feet

Frank Clyde Brown (1870-1943) served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University, and as Comptroller and University Marshall of Duke University. He oversaw the initial construction of Duke University's West Campus and the renovation of East Campus. Brown also founded the North Carolina Folklore Society. The Frank C. Brown Papers contain correspondence, logs, diaries, reports, lantern slides, notebooks, clippings, a scrapbook, and other materials. While some papers relate to teaching and English department activities, the bulk of the collection concerns the construction of Duke University, including correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, builder and manufacturer information, construction progress reports, travel diaries of visits to other campuses, and records of James B. Duke's views on architecture and involvement in campus planning. English.

The Frank C. Brown Papers include both Personal papers and Subject files relating to his career as a student, professor, and folklorist and also to his role in the construction of the Duke University campuses. The Personal papers series includes correspondence, biographical information, writings, addresses, lectures, clippings, diaries, coursework, blueprints, and slides. It includes correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, manufacturers' literature, construction progress reports, diaries of trips made in 1924 and 1926 to look at other campuses, and a lantern slide presentation on the campus. This series contains records documenting James B. Duke's views on architecture and his involvement in the planning of the campus. Also present is a diary/scrapbook kept by Brown and President William Preston Few during a 1924 tour during which they visited some twenty colleges and universities around the Eastern United States.

The Subject files series contains the alphabetical office files of Frank C. Brown. The bulk of the files pertain to the construction of the Duke University campuses and include information on planning, design, building materials, furnishings, builders, manufacturers, and vendors. A few items interfiled in the Subject files series relate to Brown's activities as a faculty member and as a member of professional and academic organizations.

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Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan Papers, 1924-2011 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet

Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan was a professor of French at Duke University from the 1960s through the 1990s. The Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan Papers include biographical materials, writings, a textbook, and other materials from her life in France and at Duke University.

The collection consists of photographs, writings, and memorabilia from Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan's life and work as a professor of French at Duke University. Photographs span Anne-Marie Bryan's life and include images of her family, including her husband and children; the majority of the images are reproductions of originals. Writings include a copy of her textbook Fast French (published posthumously), a typed manuscript copy of a memoir in French as well as selections from a separate memoir in English. Also included are copies of some artwork created by Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan, a biography written by her daughter Yvonne Bryan Tomek, and poems about her life written by her son-in-law and former student, James Tomek.

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Virginia Bryan Papers, 1955-2007 2.0 Linear Feet

Virginia Bryan was Assistant Dean of the Woman's College and a botanist. The collection includes correspondence, notes, field notebooks, article reprints, and other materials related to Virgnina Bryan's work as a botanist.

The collection includes correspondence, notes, field notebooks, article reprints, and other materials related to Virgnina Bryan's work as a botanist.

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Edmund M. Cameron records, 1929 - 1972 13.5 Linear Feet

Edmund "Eddie" McCullough Cameron (1902-1988) served as head basketball coach, head football coach, and Athletic Director during his 46 year career at Duke University. He was known for enhancing Duke athletics and the Department of Physical Education by improving and adding facilities and expanding athletic programs. The Cameron Indoor Stadium at Duke was named in his honor. The Cameron papers include correspondence, reports, memoranda, scrapbooks, and other printed materials. Among the major subjects of the collection are the Duke basketball and football teams, the Duke athletic department, the Duke Department of Physical Education, collegiate athletics, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and the Atlantic Coast Conference. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reports, memoranda, scrapbooks, and other materials related to Cameron's career at Duke University. The first series, Subject Files, consists of office files, primarily correspondence, from the 1950s to the early 1970s, during Cameron's term as Athletic Director. The second series, Correspondence, also consists of some professional correspondence, but includes a number of personal letters and dates from the 1940s to the 1970s. The Clippings series is a brief collection of articles saved by Cameron. The Manuals and Printed Materials series includes reports and guides published by the NCAA and the ACC during the 1950s through the 1970s. The Scrapbooks series consists of three disassembled scrapbooks dating from the 1920s through the 1970s. These books include correspondence, photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, game programs, and tickets and other memorabilia.

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James Cannon III papers, 1912 - 1974 4.6 Linear Feet — 4,500 Items

James Cannon III worked as an educator and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1960, serving as Dean of the Divinity School from 1951 to 1958. The Canon papers contain correspondence, manuscript drafts of sermons and publications, course materials, subject files, clippings, photographs, ephemera, and scrapbooks relating to the life and work of James Cannon III. Major subjects include biblical literature and the Bible as literature, religious education, missionary training, history of religion, Christianity, Buddhism, comparative religion, and the Cannon family, especially James Cannon, Jr. and James Cannon IV. English.

The Cannon papers were originally organized into three main files and arranged alphabetically within these files. Three series reflecting the original order were created: Personal files and family history, Writings, and Subject files. The Writings series was reorganized by type of writing into three subseries: Sermons, Articles, and Course materials. Some clippings files, reference materials, gradebooks, and duplicates were removed from the papers.

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Julian Shakespeare Carr papers, 1880-1982 0.5 Linear Feet — approx. 85 items

Julian Carr was a tobacco and textile manufacturer and civic leader of Durham (Durham Co.), N.C. He also served on the Board of Trustees of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). The collection includes material related to Carr's service on the Board of Trustees as well as personal family papers. The material ranges in date from 1880-1982.

The collection includes about 72 items which cover the period when Carr served as Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.) and on the Committee of Management with John Wesley Alspaugh and James Alexander Gray. The bulk of this correspondence deals with attempts by Carr, largely unsuccessful, to call in notes pledged to the endowment of the College. There are significant letters from Alspaugh, Gray, and John Franklin Crowell, as well as a Treasurer's Report (circa 1885), other financial matters, and lists of Methodist Church assessments made to support Trinity College. Other subjects treated include the settlement of an estate, bills for the widow of Braxton Craven, and a student petition for the replacement of Professor W. T. Gannaway. There are also letters from John W. Sanborn, a candidate for the College's presidency. The other items in the collection include clippings and a photograph pertaining to the Carr family and homes; a farm journal (1910-1911) with instructions from Carr to his manager, B. S. Skinner, and samples of chewing and twist tobacco and handmade cigarettes produced in the 1880s at W. T. Blackwell's Durham tobacco company.

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E. Malcolm Carroll papers, circa 1930-1954 3.7 Linear Feet — 600 Items

E. Malcolm Carroll was a professor of History at Duke University from 1933-1959. The collection includes his writings, research notes, some course materials and a manuscript, mostly undated. The collection ranges in date from circa circa 1930-1954.

Collection includes manuscripts, clippings, course materials, and handwritten research notes relating to Carroll's publishing project on German World War I and World War II documents. There is also a book-length manuscript entitled "The Western Powers and Soviet Russia, 1917-1921," a book review for the South Atlantic Quarterly, five addresses, and a copy of the preliminary bibliography of the writings of Dr. Carroll, which was compiled by Frederic B. M. Hollyday. While most items are undated, the collection ranges in date from circa circa 1930-1954.

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Allan Murray Cartter papers, 1955-1959 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Allan M. Cartter was a professor of Economics and Dean of the Graduate School at Duke from 1959 to 1962. The collection contains two book manuscripts, for The Redistribution of Income in Postwar Britain (1955) and The Theory of Wages and Employment (1959). The collection ranges in date from 1955-1959.

Collection contains manuscripts of two of Cartter's published books: The Redistribution of Income in Postwar Britain (1955) and The Theory of Wages and Employment (1959). Items were untied and foldered for processing. It ranges in date from 1955-1959.

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Ernesto G. Caserta papers, 1965-2007 1 Linear Foot — approx. 650 Items

Ernesto G. Caserta was a professor in the Dept. of Romance Languages at Duke University. Collection includes notebooks prepared by Caserta of scans and the original documentation, largely consisting of correspondence from 1965-2007. The bulk of the collection is in Italian.

The bulk of the collection is in Italian. Senior Processing Archivist Paula Jeannet Mangiafico translated the material and provided the following collection overview:

Divided into three series (descriptions taken directly from his papers): professors and scholars; miscellany (colleagues, friends, and students); and Duke University correspondence (promotions, Hearing Committee, Research Council)

Scanned copies followed by the original letters, assembled and arranged by Caserta. Arranged in chronological order, with the exception of Part II and the Appendix, which are in alphabetical order.

Letters written to Caserta from Rocco Montano (U. of Illinois) form the bulk of the body of the first series, and chiefly discuss the state of Italian studies in the U.S., academic culture, Montano's publications and literary research, and Caserta's own career at Duke and his literary writings. There are few personal or family matters discussed, but throughout there are references to each man's health. The correspondence extends from 1965 to 2007.

The rest of series one, notebook 2, begins with Alfredo Parente (several letters), and then the rest is taken up with a long-term correspondence from Dante Della Terza (Harvard), 1970-2007, Caserta's graduate studies mentor at Harvard, chiefly focusing on the same topics as Montano. Della Terza writes in almost every instance of Caserta's difficulties with the pursuit of promotion and tenure at Duke University. This correspondence is followed by a lengthy body of letters from Giovanni Cecchetti (UCLA), 1968-1993, again focusing on the state of Croce studies (Caserta's specialty), Italian studies in the U.S., the culture of the academy in the U.S., publications both by Cecchetti, Caserta, and others (particularly in the field of Dante and Croce studies. Cecchetti, as others, gives advice in almost every letter concerning Caserta's professional development, beginning from the completion of Caserta's thesis on Croce and throughout his years at Duke University. Throughout this series from Notebook 2 there are many references to Caserta's publications and their reception in the U.S., including his work on Croce and Marxist thought. Other smaller groups in this series include letters from Giovanni Gullace (SUNY Binghampton), 1982-1998, Raffaello Franchini (Univ. of Naples), 1971-1988, and Angelo De Gennaro (Loyola Marymount), 1983-1989. The content of these letters is much the same.

The second series, miscellaneous letters from friends, colleagues, and students, contain more references to personal matters, such as his married life and travels, and are sometimes more informal in nature than previous series of exchanges with older colleagues.

The third series is entirely in English and is taken up with Caserta's series of difficulties with promotion and support at Duke University. This material is restricted for 25 years from date of origin as it contains administrative records.

The fourth series contains the original letters and documents that comprise the first three series. The Duke-related material is also restricted for 25 years from the date of origin.

Materials were removed from non-archival binders and placed in archival folders, in original order.

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Nora Campbell Chaffin papers, 1835-1981 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Nora Chaffin was on the history faculty at Duke University from 1935-1944. Her collection contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

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Lewis Nathaniel Chase papers, 1807-1941 2 Linear Feet

Lewis Chase taught in the English Department at Duke University beginning in 1929. It is unclear when/if he left the University. He died in 1937. The collection largely includes material pertaining to Chase's research on writer Edgar Allan Poe. It ranges in date from 1807-1941.

The collection includes correspondence pertaining to Chase's publications and research on Edgar Allan Poe's works, Chase's research notes, typescripts of Poe-related correspondence found in libraries, clippings, postcards and other memorabilia relating to Edgar Allan Poe. It also includes photographs, mostly commercial prints, of people and places related to Poe's life, including London scenes, the Poe cottage and Seagate Castle. Correspondence files are extremely brittle. Among the correspondents are Edmund Gosse, John Erskine and J. E. Spingarn. There is also an unidentified handwritten travel diary dated September 1858, which was found in the Woman's College Library, and believed to have been left by Chase. It details travels in New England and China. Paperclips damaging the files were replaced, as were disintegrating folders. The collection ranges in date from 1807-1941.

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Robert Wilson Christ papers, 1922-1952 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Christ was assistant librarian for Duke University from 1948 until his death in 1951. Primarily materials pertaining Robert Wilson Christ's professional activities with the American Librarian Association. The papers also include a talk given to the North Carolina Negro Library Association. Christ collected the writings of Walter de La Mare and his papers contain seven letters by De la Mare and one by the illustrator W. Graham Robertson.

Primarily materials pertaining Robert Wilson Christ's professional activities with the American Librarian Association. The papers also include a talk given to the North Carolina Negro Library Association. Christ collected the writings of Walter de La Mare and his papers contain seven letters by De la Mare and one by the illustrator W. Graham Robertson.

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Elmer T. Clark papers, 1929 6 Linear Feet — 9 Items

Born in 1886, Elmer Talmadge Clark was a publicist and editor for the Methodist Church and related bodies. Collection contains 9 bound volumes of original data questionnaire sheets regarding The Psychology of Religious Awakening, published in 1929 by the MacMillan Company.

Contains 9 bound volumes of original date questionnaire sheets regarding the Psychology of Religious Awakening, published in 1929 by the MacMillan Company. It was based on a four-page questionnaire on religious experience covering: I. General, II. Religious Education, III. Conversion and IV. Religious Growth. Volumes are numbered I-XI.

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Elon Clark papers, 1958-1970 2.2 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Elon Clark was a professor in the Duke Medical Center's Division of Audiovisual Education. His collection includes drawings, sketches, correspondence and other materials used to design the Duke University shield, mace, academic gowns, flags and university colors.

Collection contains drawings, sketches, correspondence, and other materials used in the design of the Duke University shield, mace, academic gowns, flags, and university colors. Only representative examples of preliminary designs were retained. Drawings and sketches were interleaved with archival paper and placed in buffered folders for preservation. The oversize container includes drawings by Professor Ransom Patrick (Art Department) as suggested for new design for Duke Shield (1) and flag (2). Also present is an original drawing by Elon H. Clark that was presented to and accepted by the Trustees.

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Kenneth Willis Clark papers, 1924-1980 23 Linear Feet

Kenneth Willis Clark was a faculty member in the Divinity School at Duke University. The Kenneth W. Clark papers include materials from Kenneth Clark's time as a faculty member in the Divinity School. Topics covered include teaching and work on a translation of the biblical New Testament from Greek manuscripts.

The Kenneth W. Clark papers include materials from Kenneth Clark's time as a faculty member in the Divinity School. Topics covered include teaching and work on a translation of the biblical New Testament from Greek manuscripts.

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Diskin Clay papers, 1962-2014 18 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Diskin Clay was on the Classics faculty at Duke University from 1990 to 2008. This collection of his professional papers includes correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus. There are also many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips.

The professional papers of classics professor Diskin Clay include correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus.

Also included in the collection are many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips. Clay's writings are also present in the form of short papers and drafts of longer works. There is one CD-ROM.

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James T. Cleland papers, 1928-1975 50 Linear Feet — 50,000 Items

Contains personal and professional papers relating to the life and work of James Tough Cleland, preacher, Dean of the Duke University Chapel (1955-1973), and Professor of Preaching in the Divinity School (1945-1968). Materials include addresses, sermons, lecture notes, speeches, clippings, printed materials, correspondence, a tape recording, committee records, course materials, photographs, subject files, a scrapbook, diaries, and gift albums. Albums include sketches, engravings, frontispieces, and colored illustrations from printed materials. Major subjects include armed forces chaplains, hospital chaplains, death and dying, euthanasia, spirituality, Christianity, the study and teaching of the book of Paul, the study and teaching of the Bible, study and teaching of preaching, Duke University Chapel, Duke University, and the Divinity School. Materials range in date from 1825 to 1982 (bulk 1928-1975). Contains restricted materials. English.

Contains personal and professional papers relating to the life and work of James T. Cleland, preacher, Dean of the Duke University Chapel (1955-1973), and Professor of Preaching in the Divinity School (1945-1968). Types of materials include addresses, sermons, lecture notes, speeches, clippings, printed materials, correspondence, a tape recording, committee records, course materials, photographs, subject files, a scrapbook, diaries, and gift albums. Gift albums include sketches, engravings, frontispieces, and colored illustrations from printed materials. Materials range in date from 1825 to 1982 (bulk 1928-1975). Box 19 contains restricted materials.

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Joel G. Colton papers, 1942-2002 8.5 Linear Feet — 8,000 Items

Joel G. Colton (b. 1918), Professor of History and administrator at Duke University (1947-1974, 1982- ). Collection contains correspondence, course materials, writings, clippings, committee materials, subject files, and research notes of Colton.

Correspondence, course materials, writings, clippings, committee materials, subject files, and research notes of Joel G. Colton relating to his teaching and administration at Duke University, military service, education, awards, and publications.

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miriam cooke Papers, 1981-2013, bulk Bulk 1985-1992 1.5 Linear Feet

miriam cooke is a professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. The miriam cooke Papers include materials documenting a faculty exchange program between Duke and Cadi Ayaad University in Morocco, as well as other projects related to Islam and the Middle East, such as the Duke Islamic Center (DISC) and a draft of the book Mediterranean Passages: Readings from Dido to Derrida (2008). The papers also include materials about Duke faculty operations, particularly within the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL).

This collection documents the professional and administrative activities of miriam cooke, professor in the department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University (formerly AALL, Asian and African Languages and Literature). Professional activities documented include the development of a faculty exchange program between Duke and Cadi Ayaad University in Marrakesh, Morocco, beginning with a festival of Moroccan culture held at Duke in 1985. Several files contain correspondence with the United States Information Agency (USIA), which provided grant funding for the program, and journals from faculty members in the United States and Morocco detailing their exchange experiences. Other files in this series contain information relating the Center for Study of Muslim Networks, which formally developed into the Duke Islamic Center (DISC) in 2006; and a project on War and Gender conducted in the early 1990s with Duke University History professor Alex Roland. Administrative activities documented focus on cooke's role as a Duke professor. Files include records about faculty and courses in the AALL Department; and correspondence with three deans of Arts and Sciences at Duke: Richard White, Hans Hillerbrand, and Malcolm Gillis. Some materials relate to cooke's time on committees monitoring the interests of women faculty and non-regular faculty at Duke. Publications files include correspondence with members of the Mediterranean Study Committee, information about the Oceans Connect project between Duke and Middle Eastern faculty, and draft chapters for the book Mediterranean Passages: Readings from Dido to Derrida. Materials are largely textual, comprising correspondence, minutes and agendas, faculty travel journals, clippings, publications, and related printed matter. A VHS tape and a few photographs are also contained within the collection.

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Frederick Augustus Grant Cowper papers, 1900-1975 13.5 Linear Feet

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Frederick Cowper was an educator, born in Island Pond, Vermont, March 3, 1883. He received his B.A.,1906, and M.A., 1911, at Trinity College, Hartford, CT, and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, 1920. Cowper also received an L.H.D, from Trinity College in 1956. He was the author of, The Sources, Date and Style of Ille et Galeron, by Gautier d'Arras, (1922), and other works. Cowper was a professor of Romance Languages, Trinity College, Durham, NC, 1918-1924, Duke University, 1924-1952. He married Mary O. Thompson, (1881-1968) in 1909. Dr. Cowper died in Durham on January 24, 1978. There were no children. This collection contains correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, printed material, photographs and film, with bulk dates 1920-1970, produced or acquired by Professor Cowper.

This collection contains correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, printed material, photographs and film, with bulk dates 1920-1970, produced or acquired by Professor Cowper. The major subject of the collection, and of Cowper's scholarly career, is the Ille et Galeron. Other subjects in the papers concern support for liquor laws in Durham and in North Carolina generally, the genealogy of the Cowper and related families, 19th century British consuls in Latin America, civil defense volunteers, and research and teaching romance languages and literature.

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Mason Crum papers, 1885-1974 11 Linear Feet

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Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.

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Bert Cunningham papers, 1927-1943 2.2 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Bert Cunningham was a professor of Biology and Zoology at Trinity College and Duke University from 1916-1943. His collection includes the manuscript and illustrations for his book Introduction to Biology for the College Students, as well as professional correspondence.

Collection contains correspondence relating to the Duke Department of Zoology, the N.C. Academy of Science, and the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Also includes a final revised typescript copy of Cunningham's Introduction to Biology for the College Students as well as correspondence relating to the possible publication of this book.

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John Shelton Curtiss papers, 1796-1981 6.5 Linear Feet

John Shelton Curtiss was a professor emeritus of history at Duke University, specializing in Russian history and civilization. The collection includes professional and personal papers, as well as extensive documentation of Curtiss family history and genealogy.

The collection is divided into three series: professional papers, personal papers, and family history and genealogy.

Curtiss' professional papers are exclusively from after his retirement as a faculty member at Duke University. They include drafts of scholarly articles written by him after his retirement, book reviews and publication information for his book Russia's Crimean War, a C.V., and recommendations for former students.

His personal papers are much more extensive, covering the breadth of his activities during his retirement. Included is his work with a number of local organizations, such as the Durham County Public Library, the Kiwanis Club, the Ruritan society, and the Lebanon Volunteer Fire Department. Also included are personal correspondence, both with family and acquaintances, letters to congress, political activism, documents pertaining to land he partly owned in Texas, and an autobiography he wrote concerning his life in retirement.

The final series is materials pertaining to Curtiss family history and genealogy. These include family trees, baptismal and marriage certificates, correspondence dating back to the early 19th century between various distant relations, and a number of materials which appear to have belonged to his father, Harlow C. Curtiss. Photographs of many family members are present. Also included are photographs of a trip to Moscow John and Edna Curtiss took in 1955. The bulk of the material concerns the Curtiss' line, but some materials concerning the family history of Edna Sutter Curtiss are also included. Most material is manuscript, but at the end of the series are a number of bound volumes concerning family history in Connecticut and New England, as well as a copy of the complete works of Turgenev written in Russian.

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Robert Earl Cushman Papers, 1915, 1941-1988 25 Linear Feet

Robert Earl Cushman was a professor of systematic theology at Duke University, and was dean of the Divinity School from 1958-1971. He was involved internationally in issues related to the Methodist Church, ecumenism, and theological education. This collection contains correspondence, photographs, press clippings, meeting minutes and agendas, sermons, lectures, articles, publications, and other materials documenting his work within Duke Divinity School as well as his interactions with scholars and religious leaders worldwide. Files include records about internal business, courses, recruitment outreach, and student activism at Duke Divinity School; records about Cushman’s activities with the Association of Methodist Theological Schools, the World Council of Churches, and the Second Vatican Council of the Roman Catholic Church, where he was a Methodist observer during 1963-1965; writings, lectures and sermons; and personal materials.

This collection documents the administrative, professional, and personal activities of Robert Earl Cushman, who was dean of the Duke Divinity School from 1958-1971. The collection is organized into four series. Series, subseries and file names are based on the creator’s original folder labels and groupings of material. Duke University administrative materials focus on the business of the divinity school, including Cushman’s correspondence with faculty, students and administration; school committee reports; clippings; and materials related to the curriculum, student admissions and student activism. Professional materials include correspondence with church leaders and with the heads of theological schools; the series also includes reports, bulletins, clippings, and correspondence documenting Methodist conferences and ecumenical activities in which Cushman participated, both in the United States and abroad, such as his experience in Rome during the Second Vatican Council. The writings series contains drafts and final copies of lectures, articles, and sermons; a bound copy of Cushman’s doctoral dissertation; files related to the Wesley Works project; bound copy of his doctoral dissertation about Plato and some clippings and research materials. Personal materials contains correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues; as well as memorabilia, clippings, and miscellaneous documents, including one 1915 document from World War I. The collection contains photographs; an oversize blueprint of the proposed Divinity School renovation; and a recording of an address by King Hussein of Jordan.

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Frank Dailey papers, 1937-1944 0.5 Linear Feet

The collection largely includes photographs taken by Dailey while a student at Duke University. They date from 1938-1940 and include various subjects, including football and the social activities of students. There is a small cache of clippings/newsprint and ephemera.

The collection contains largely photographs taken by Dailey during his time as a student at Duke. The topics of his photographs range from football to dances to fraternity initiations. There are four photograph albums, described in greater detail below, as well s loose photographs which have been sleeved. Many of the loose photographs are enlarged copies of images found in the albums. There are also some clippings and newsprint which may contain published photographs taken by Dailey and ephemera. The collection ranges in date from 1937-1944.

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W. D. Davies papers, 1911-2007 106.5 Linear Feet — 78 containers

W. D. (William David) Davies (1911-2001) was Professor of Biblical Theology at Duke University Divinity School from 1950 to 1955 and from 1966 to 1981 was George Washington Ivey Professor of Advanced Studies and Research in Christian Origins. The collection features correspondence, course materials, writings, subject files, sermon notes, books, and research notes of W. D. Davies. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The collection includes correspondence, research materials, teaching materials, photographs, and books. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The first series, containing multiple accessions, includes correspondence, manuscript materials, article reprints, student papers, lecture notes, course reading materials, sermon notes, student notebooks relating to courses taken at the University of Wales Memorial College in Brecon, general research subject files, research notes relating to teaching at Duke University, Columbia University, Princeton University, Union Theological Seminary, and Texas Christian University.

Accession UA2014-0065 contains personal and professional correspondence, scholarly materials and books from Davies' personal library. The collection also contains materials related to Davies' Feschrift, an honor celebrating Davies'contributions to the field of biblical theology.

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Frank Traver De Vyver papers, 1899-1980 27 Linear Feet — 15,000 Items

Frank Traver De Vyver, 1904-1980, was an economist, professor of economics, and university administrator at Duke University from 1936-1980, and Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills from 1945-1955. The Frank Traver De Vyver Papers, 1899-1980, comprise the correspondence, writings, research, administrative and managerial records, and other professional papers of the economist Frank Traver De Vyver, who was a scholar on the history of labor economics and labor movements and unions. The collection is arranged in six series. Correspondence and Personal Papers contain his personal and professional correspondence and biographical material, including a photograph album of his travel abroad and a scrapbook of his career. The Writings and Research Series contains drafts and reprints of his articles and his research on labor unions and industrial arbitration in Australia and the United States. The Department of Economics Series mainly consists of departmental correspondence and administrative records. De Vyver's work as a Duke University administrator is documented in the University Committees Series, with the largest groups of materials being from the University Planning Committee and the Educational Facilities Committee. The Subject Files cover all of De Vyver's professional activities, including his work as a professional arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association; his managerial career as Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills, Durham, N.C.; his service on government committees and boards, including the War Production Board; his scholarly work on labor economics and industrial relations, collective bargaining agreements, grievance procedures, wages, and textile workers; documents on the Textile Workers Union of America; and his work on the history of labor movements and labor unions in the United States, Australia, and South Africa. The Printed Materials Series contains reprints of his articles and a variety of other formats, including clippings, pamphlets, posters, and serials.

The Frank Traver De Vyver Papers, 1899-1980, comprise the correspondence, writings, research, administrative and managerial records, and other professional papers that De Vyver produced in a half-century career as an economist and scholar specializing in the history of labor economics, movements, and unions, as a professor of economics and a university administrator at Duke University, and as an industrial manager and arbitrator. De Vyver's papers have been arranged in the following six series. The Correspondence and Personal Papers Series primarily consists of his personal and professional correspondence, but also contains biographical material, including a photograph album of his travel abroad and a scrapbook of clippings, photographs, and printed materials about his professional career. The Writings and Research Series contains drafts and reprints of De Vyver's articles and his notes and research materials on such topics as the history of labor unions and industrial arbitration in Australia and the United States. De Vyver's writings are followed by the Department of Economics Series, which includes some teaching materials but is mainly composed of departmental correspondence and administrative records. In addition to his teaching and departmental duties, De Vyver was also very active in the administrative life of Duke University, and this part of his career is extensively documented in the University Committees Series. His work on more than twenty committees, councils, and task forces is represented here, with the largest groups of materials deriving from the University Planning Committee and one of its standing committees, Educational Facilities, which De Vyver chaired from 1962-1974. The Subject Files make up the largest series, comprising almost half the collection. These files cover the full breadth of De Vyver's professional life, not only complementing topics covered in other series but also documenting many colleagues, organizations, and subjects not represented elsewhere in the collection. The following are among the most prominent groups of materials in the Subject Files: De Vyver's work as a professional arbitrator, generally as a representative of the American Arbitration Association; his managerial career as a Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills, a textile mile formerly in Durham, N.C.; his service on various government committees and boards, including the War Production Board; his scholarly work on and professional involvement with a wide variety of subjects and organizations in the fields of labor economics and industrial relations, including collective bargaining agreements, grievance procedures, wages, and textile workers; materials about the Textile Workers Union of America; and the history of labor movements and labor unions in the United States, Australia, and South Africa. The final series of the collection consists of Printed Materials, including reprints of De Vyver's articles and a wide variety of loose research materials in such categories as clippings, pamphlets, posters, and serials.

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Bernard I. Duffey papers, 1957 - 1983 1 Linear Foot — 1,000 Items

Bernard I. Duffey worked as an author and Professor of English at Duke University. Papers include correspondence, notebooks, memoranda, minutes, committee notes, course materials, manuscript materials and research notes. Major subjects include Bernard I. Duffey, Duke University, Duke University's Department of English curriculum, the Duke University Press, Program II, and study and teaching of American literature and poetry. Materials range in date from 1957-1983. Contains restricted materials. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the professional work of Bernard I. Duffey, author and Professor of English at Duke University. Papers include correspondence, notebooks, memoranda, minutes, committee notes, course materials, manuscript materials and research notes. Major subjects include Bernard I. Duffey, Duke University, Duke University's Department of English curriculum, the Duke University Press, Program II, and study and teaching of American literature and poetry. Materials range in date from 1957-1983. Contains restricted materials.

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Louis Dupree papers, 1943-1989 and undated 4.5 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Louis Dupree was a scholar, educator, and consultant on the refugees, politics, and archaeology of Afghanistan and Pakistan. He served as a Senior Research Associate for the Program in Islamic and Arabian Development Studies at Duke University during the late 1980s. The Louis Dupree Papers contain correspondence, notes, clippings, conference programs, drafts, manuscripts, speeches, newsletters, interview transcripts, research materials, teaching materials, a scrapbook, photographs, grant applications, memorabilia, student papers, a dissertation, and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of archaeologist, activist, and scholar Louis Dupree. Major subjects include Louis Dupree, Nancy Hatch Dupree, the Duke University Program in Islamic and Arabian Development Studies, Ralph Braibanti, Afghanistan, Afghan refugees, Afghanistan-Pakistan relations, Pakistan, the United States Army 11th Airborne, the United States Army 187th Airborne, and the United States Military Academy at West Point. English.

The Louis Dupree papers contain correspondence, notes, clippings, conference programs, drafts, manuscripts, speeches, newsletters, interview transcripts, research materials, teaching materials, a scrapbook, photographs, grant applications, memorabilia, student papers, a dissertation, and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of archaeologist, activist, and scholar Louis Dupree.

Major subjects include Louis Dupree, Nancy Hatch Dupree, the Duke University Program in Islamic and Arabian Development Studies, Ralph Braibanti, Afghanistan, Afghan refugees, Afghanistan-Pakistan relations, Pakistan, the United States Army 11th Airborne, the United States Army 187th Airborne, and the United States Military Academy at West Point. Materials range in date from 1943 to 1989. The bulk of the material is from 1980 to 1989, as Dupree had destroyed much of his correspondence and papers, because, according to Nancy Hatch Dupree, he thought they were nobody's business.

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Henry R. Dwire papers, 1897-1944 1.2 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Henry R. Dwire was an alumnus of Trinity College and was appointed Duke University Vice President in 1941 and Director of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs in 1944. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, certificates and a diploma. The collection ranges in date from 1897-1944.

The collection contains Dwire's high school diploma, two certificates, correspondence, photographs, and clippings. The correspondence is congratulatory towards Dwire for his appointment as Duke University Vice President in 1941 and for the honorary degree he was awarded by Davidson College in 1943. Most of the photographs were taken at Davidson College. Most of the loose material was removed from a scrapbook after being transferred to the Archives in 1960. There is adhesive on many of the pages. The collection ranges in date from 1897-1944.

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Howard Easley papers, 1936-1954 1 Linear Foot — 500 Items

Howard Easley was a psychologist and professor of Education at Duke University from 1930 to 1957. Collection includes correspondence, course materials, manuscripts, lists, printed matter, and other papers concerning the Education Department, parapsychology, educational psychology, testing and related subjects. Correspondence, 1936-1942, with students, colleagues and editors includes copies of 1938 letters between J.B. Rhine and Virginia Harding, mother of purported psychic Faith Harding.

Collection includes correspondence, course materials, manuscripts, lists, printed matter, and other papers concerning the Education Department, parapsychology, educational psychology, testing and related subjects. Correspondence, 1936-1942, with students, colleagues and editors includes copies of 1938 letters between J.B. Rhine and Virginia Harding, mother of purported psychic Faith Harding. Course materials include examinations. Manuscripts, mostly by others, include preliminary dissertation exams by several students. Also included are pamphlets related to the genealogy of the Easley and McCullough families, a few gradebooks, and U.S. Naval paperwork regarding Easley.

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Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

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John M. Fein papers, 1960-1985 0.5 Linear Feet — 150 Items

John M. Fein is a Professor Emeritus, Spanish in the Department of Romance Languages. Contains correspondence, memoranda and reports and drafts concerning University committees and their work, including the Acadmic Affairs Commmittee and the University Committee on Undergraduate Admission and Financial Aid. The material ranges in date from 1960-1985.

Contains correspondence, memoranda and reports and drafts concerning University committees and their work. The material ranges in date from 1960-1985.

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Donald J. Fluke papers, 1958-1988 2.1 Linear Feet — 800 Items

Donald J. Fluke was a professor in Duke's Zoology Department. His collection includes correspondence and other documents relating to the Zoology Department, the Graduate School, research proposals and safety, and faculty involvement in civil rights activism. Materials range in date from [1958]-[1988].

Contains correspondence, memoranda, printed materials, clippings, minutes and other records of several University committees from the years roughly 1958-1988. Also includes documents and correspondence relating to research proposals and permits. Major subjects include the Duke Radiation Safety Committee, the Founders' Day Committee and the design of the University Medal, the origins of the School of Business, the Zoology Department, and the Aeolian Organ. Collection also includes documents relating to faculty participation in the civil rights and other Vietnam-era activism.

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Lloyd R. Fortney papers, 1964-1998 2.5 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Lloyd Fortney was a professor of Physics at Duke University. His collection includes grant proposals, correspondence, memos and documents relating to the Physics Department and the Graduate School.

Contains grant proposals, department and Graduate School correspondence, memos and financial documents from the years roughly 1964-98.

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Frances Campbell Brown papers, 1932-1975 9 Linear Feet — 6000 Items

Frances Campbell Brown was a professor of chemistry at Duke from approximately 1931-1973, and a professor emeriti after 1973. Professor Brown was also active in the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), serving as its second vice president from 1964-1966. This collection contains correspondence, subject files, committee minutes, printed matter, speeches, and reports concerning personal, professional, departmental, university matters as well as the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). The bulk of the material dates from 1958-1968. All materials relating to the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and Committee A are restricted until 2017.

This collection contains correspondence and subject files concerning personal, professional, departmental, and university matters; the bulk of the material dates from 1958-1968. Documents include letters, memoranda, committee minutes, printed matter, speeches, and reports. There is a small amount of material concerning the 1962 revision of the University Bylaws in light of the American Association of University Professor's (AAUP) statements on tenure. Major subjects in the collection include academic freedom and tenure, the AAUP, faculty responsibility for educational policy, science libraries, the Department of Chemistry, admissions and Program II. The bulk of the material was generated or received by Dr. Brown in her role as a member and officer of the AAUP.

All materials regarding the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and Committee A are restricted until 2017.

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Ernestine Friedl papers, circa 1950 - 2000 22.5 Linear Feet — 15000 Items

Ernestine Friedl served as chair of the Dept. of Anthropology and as Dean of Arts and Sciences and Trinity College at Duke University. She studied gender roles, rural life in modern Greece, and the Chippewa. The Ernestine Friedl papers include personal and professional correspondence, subject files, course materials, articles, reprints, field notes, and sound recordings related to her anthropological research and her roles as professor and administrator at Queens College and Duke University. English.

The Ernestine Friedl papers include personal and professional correspondence, subject files, course materials, articles, reprints, field notes, and sound recordings related to her anthropological research and her roles as professor and administrator at Queens College and Duke University.

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Thomas M. Gallie papers, 1955 - 1972 9 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Thomas M. Gallie served as Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Computer Science Program at Duke University, and as leader of Triangle Universities Computation Center and the N.C. Educational Computing Services initiatives. The Gallie papers include correspondence, memoranda, reports, clippings, financial records, and grant proposals. Major subjects include the Duke University Department of Mathematics, the Department of Computer Science, N.C. Educational Computing Services, Triangle Universities Computation Center, computing at Duke University, computing in medical services, and computerized phonetic transcriptions. Materials range in date from 1955-1972.

The Gallie papers include correspondence, memoranda, reports, clippings, financial records, and grant proposals pertaining to the career of Thomas M. Gallie, the Triangle Universities Computation Center, and computing at Duke University. Materials range in date from 1955-1972.

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William T. Gannaway papers, 1853-1906 2.4 Linear Feet

William Gannaway was a Professor of Latin and History at Trinity College in Randolph County from 1857 until his retirement in 1892. The collection includes account books and grade books as well as a small amount of correspondence and notes. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

The collection largely includes grade books and account books. These consist of personal account books (Gannaway, like many other teachers, was also a working farmer) and college account books. They have not been separated. The is a report to the Trustees from 1864 as well as miscellaneous memoranda, receipts, financial records and notes, and a small amount of correspondence, including a letter from E. F. Finch in 1888 that concerns the financial affairs of Charles Heitman and their effects on Trinity College. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

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William Henry Glasson papers, 1891 - 1946 and undated 5.0 Linear Feet

William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

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Allen H. Godbey papers, 1926-1947 0.3 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Dr. Allen Godbey was a Professor of Old Testament History at Duke University from 1926-1932. The collection contains letters and self-published printed material. The material ranges in date from 1926-1947.

Contains letters and self-published printed materials. Material ranges in date from 1926-1947.

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Craufurd D. W. Goodwin papers, 1960-2010 78 Linear Feet

Craufurd D. Goodwin has served as a Professor of Economics and administrator at Duke University since 1962. Papers of Craufurd D. W. Goodwin, educator and administrator at Duke University, include correspondence, writings, and subject files relating to his roles as Professor of Economics, Director of International Studies, Vice Provost and Director of International Programs, Vice Provost for Research, and Dean of the Graduate School. Also includes materials from his work for the Ford Foundation.

Papers of Craufurd D. W. Goodwin, educator and administrator at Duke University, include correspondence, writings, and subject files relating to his roles as Professor of Economics, Director of International Studies, Vice Provost and Director of International Programs, Vice Provost for Research, and Dean of the Graduate School. Also included are records of the Board of Trustees Executive Committee, the Academic Council, the Provost Group, numerous economic and economic history professional societies, and several philanthropic foundations, including the Ford Foundation.

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Walter Gordy papers, 1935 - 1986 37.5 Linear Feet — 29,000 Items

Walter Gordy (1909-1985) was a James B. Duke Professor of Physics at Duke University. In his over thirty year career at Duke, he founded and directed the Duke Microwave Laboratory, and researched and published extensively. The Walter Gordy Papers include correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. Major subjects include microwave spectroscopy, microwave radar, the Duke Microwave Laboratory, Army research Office , Durham (ARO-D), and the Duke Department of Physics. English.

The collection includes correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. The materials date from approximately 1935 to 1986. Gordy's professional career, particularly his work at Duke, is well represented. Much of the material stems from his research in the Duke Microwave Laboratory. The correspondence in the collection is mainly professional. A few materials, such as trip souvenirs, represent Gordy's personal life.

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Irving Emery Gray papers, 1915-1980 12 Linear Feet

Irving Emery Gray (1897-1980) was chair of the Zoology Department at Duke University and helped establish the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina. His interests included marine zoology and ecology, and biological adaptation. The Irving Emery Gray Papers include correspondence, reports, notes, documents, slides, photographs, and other materials about Gray's personal and professional life. Major subjects include the Zoology Department at Duke, marine biology, Arthur Sperry Pearse, and the National Science Foundation. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reports, notes, documents, slides, photographs, and other materials related to the professional career and personal life of Gray. His interests in education, zoology, biology, and ecology are represented. The collection features materials generated by his work as chair of the Zoology Department, records of the Duke University Marine Laboratory, copies of Gray's printed works, and correspondence with colleages. The first series, Personal and Family, contains correspondence and other materials related to Gray's personal life. The next series, Publications, Abstracts, and Other Writings, includes both Gray's own publications as well as those of his students. The third series, Zoology Department, Duke University, includes correspondence, minutes, memos and other materials related to Gray's administration of the department. The next series, Correspondence - Personal, Professional, contains correspondence arranged by both individual names and group affiliations. The Course Materials series documents the courses Gray taught, while the next series, Duke University Marine Laboratory - Beaufort, NC, documents Gray's work to establish a research laboratory. The following series, Lists, Keys, Charts, Graphs, Checklists, Bibliographies, includes a variety of reference materials. Field Trips contains notes and other information from Gray's research excursions, and Research Notes and Papers (Titled Folders) features the research used for Gray's publications. The following series, Research Notes and Papers (Unsorted) contains similar materials, but is unprocessed. The final series, Photographic Materials (Positives, Negatives, Slides) contains photographic material related to Gray's personal and professional life.

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John R. Gregg papers, bulk 1947-2009 4 Linear Feet

John R. Gregg, former professor of zoology, was born December 16, 1916. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Alabama, and then completed a Ph.D. in biology at Princeton in 1946. For a decade, he served on the faculty at Columbia University before coming to Duke in 1957. He stayed at Duke until his retirement in 1986. Gregg was also a skilled longbow archer and his papers contain some information about archery. In 2009, he died at the age of 92. The John Gregg Papers contain mostly information about Dr. Gregg's research and work including materials related to the courses he taught. His interest in archery is also reflected. The collection also contains significant correspondence between Gregg and J.H. Woodger, an influential 20th century British theoretical biologist and philosopher of biology.

The collection contains the academic and personal papers of John R. Gregg, Professor Emeritus of Zoology at Duke University. The collection includes correspondence between Gregg and leading biologists such as Joseph Henry Woodger and Arstrid Lindenmayer and notes and drafts of Gregg's many publications, research notes on a variety of subjects in Biology and Zoology, and materials related to lectures given by Gregg. The collection also reflects Gregg's experiences as a professor of Zoology at Duke University with lecture notes and class materials relating to classes he taught. Materials also include personal papers relating to Gregg's passionate interest in archery, including blueprints and designs of archery equipment created by Gregg.

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Lillian Baker Griggs papers, 1930-1949 1.5 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Papers of Lillian Baker Griggs, Librarian of the Duke University Woman's College Library, 1930 to 1949. Contains primarily correspondence, library planning records, budget files, and other materials related to the operation of the Woman's College Library. The correspondence covers activities of the North Carolina Library, the American Library Association, library legislation and education, as well as the Woman's College Library. Also includes a 60 page typed memoir written by Griggs, ca. 1940

Primarily correspondence, library planning, budget files, and other materials related to the operation of the Woman's College Library of Duke University. The correspondence covers activities of the North Carolina Library, the American Library Association, library legislation and education, as well as the Woman's College Library. Box 3 includes a 60 page typed memoir written by Lillian Baker Griggs, ca. 1940

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Julia R. Grout papers, 1916 - 1984 0.75 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Julia Rebecca Grout (1898-1984) served as Chairman of the Women's Department of Health and Physical Education at Duke University from 1924 to 1964. The Julia R. Grout Papers include correspondence, clippings, writings, printed matter, photographs, and other materials related to Grout's professional and personal interests. Topics include Grout's career and retirement; the history of physical education at Duke; comparisons of American and European physical education; physical education for women; Grout's travels to Southern Africa and Europe; and Grout's participation in the Dedication Committee of Baldwin Auditorium at Duke. English.

The Julia R. Grout Papers include correspondence, clippings, writings, printed matter, photographs, and other materials related to Grout's professional and personal interests. The papers are divided into four series. The Personal series includes Grout's resume, retirement materials, tributes to her, and documents related to her funeral. One of the retirement materials is a large bound volume of letters written to Grout by students and colleagues expressing their appreciation for her forty years of service at Duke. The second series, Correspondence, has a brief selection of letters related to Grout's professional career, her 1958 travels to Southern Africa, and work on the Dedication Committee of Baldwin Auditorium. The third series, Addresses and Writings, includes a variety of speeches, papers, and reports written by Grout over her career. Topics include the need for physical education for women, American physical education compared to that of Europe, and the history of physical education for women at Duke. Also included in this series are several speeches made by Grout at the retirement parties of other faculty and staff of the Woman's College. The final series, Professional Travels, documents Grout's international travels to Europe in 1938 and 1958, where she studied the physical education programs of Sweden, Holland, and Norway.

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Norman Guttman papers, 1952-1982 1.5 Linear Feet — 850 Items

Dr. Norman Guttman taught in the Department of Psychology from 1951 until his death in 1984. The collection contains correspondence from 1952-1982.

Contains a mixture of personal, political and professional correspondence, the latter being usually scholarly in nature, with some evaluations of grant proposals and recommendations. The folder on the Nixon Library controversy contains correspondence and printed matter, with a few petitions and name-and-address blanks from contributors to the opposition to the Library, in which Guttman was instrumental. The collection ranges in date from 1952-1982.

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Louise Hall papers, 1934-1981 1.5 Linear Feet — approx. 1000 Items

Louise Hall was a professor of Art and Architecture at Duke University from 1931-1975. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, printed material, clippings, color slides and papers related to the Art Department. The material ranges in date from 1934-1981.

The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, documents related to courses and the Art Dept. as well as reports presented to the Committee on Long Range Planning. There is also material regarding space planning, the American Association of University Women and the UNC-Duke Winchester Excavation. There are color slides of the deconstruction of the Asbury Building on East Campus, printed material, some photographs of Hall, clippings and a copy of Hall's Last Will and Testament. The material ranges in date from 1934-1981.

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John H. Hallowell papers, 1942 - 1981 9 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

John H. Hallowell served as Professor of Political Science and as Director of the Lilly Endowment Research Program in Christianity at Duke University. Papers include correspondence, committee notes, manuscript materials, printed matter, a master's thesis, diplomas, certificates, grant proposals, and student papers. Major subjects include the Duke University Department of Political Science, political ethics, the Duke University Research Council, religious education, religious activities on campus, the Lilly Endowment, and study and teaching of political science. Contains restricted materials. Materials range in date from 1942-1981. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the career of John H. Hallowell, Professor of Political Science at Duke University from 1942-1982. Also contains records of Hallowell's involvement in political science and theological associations, and correspondence. Contains restricted materials. Types of materials include correspondence, committee notes, manuscript materials, printed matter, a master's thesis, diplomas, certificates, grant proposals, and student papers. Materials range in date from 1942-1981.

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Thor Hall papers, 1961-1972 3 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Thor Hall was Associate Professor of Preaching and Theology in the Duke Divinity School from 1962 until 1972. The collection contains materials representative of Dr. Hall's work as a teacher and administrator in the Divinity School as well as information on the growth and development of the Divinity School itself. It also includes materials related to Dr. Hall's work outside the Duke community, particularly in the United Methodist Church. Of particular interest are the folders pertaining to his work in the preaching clinic which he directed in 1964 and 1965. The American Association of Theological Schools Report as well as items in the folder "Organization and Structure, 1968-1971" chart the changes in the Divinity School during the turbulent years of academic and political unrest.

The materials range in date from 1961-1972 and include correspondence, minutes, reports, brochures, and proposals. Two photographs of students at the Approved Pastors School (circa 1963) were transferred from this collection to the University Archives Photograph Collection.

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Frank Allan Hanna papers, 1850-1936 2.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Frank Allan Hanna was a professor of economics at Duke University from 1948-1972. The collection contains largely bound materials from the Wisconsin State Income Tax Study Hanna worked on but it also includes Hanna family genealogy and ledger books for "Negro Accounts" from the antebellum period and galley proofs for one of Hanna's publications. The collection ranges in date from 1850-1936.

This collection contains the work of the Wisconsin Income Tax Commission and its studies between 1929 and 1936. A master tabulating procedures manual is included. Two daybooks from South Carolina, 1850-1855, contain accounts of a store which kept special accounts for African-Americans. The volumes on the genealogy of the Hanna family are to be kept with the papers at the request of Professor Hanna. A set of galley proofs for Institutional Economics by John R. Commons has corrections by Professor Hanna. The collection ranges in date from 1850-1936.

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George Thomas Hargitt papers, 1927-1941 0.5 Linear Feet — 300 Items

George T. Hargitt came to Duke University in 1930 where he became a Professor of Zoology and Director of Graduate Studies. Contains material pertaining to Professor Hargitt's Biology classes 1-4, including lists of reference and reserve books, bibliographies, student term papers, lists of scientific leaders, and outlines for seminars and courses. Materials in the collection date from 1927-1941.

Contains material pertaining to Professor Hargitt's Biology classes 1-4, including lists of reference and reserve books, bibliographies, student term papers, lists of scientific leaders, and outlines for seminars and courses. Materials in the collection date from 1927-1941.

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Ellwood S. Harrar papers, 1928 - 1975 2 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Ellwood S. Harrar served as a Professor of Wood Technology at Duke University from 1936 to 1974, and as Dean of the Duke University School of Forestry from 1957 to 1967. He researched and published extensively on forestry and dendrology. The Ellwood S. Harrar Papers contain documents related to his interests in the lumber industry and wood production. As a Dean, he participated in the planning for the new Biological Sciences Building and frequently corresponded with contractors and vendors regarding its construction. The materials in the collection are primarily correspondence, but it also includes academic papers, biographical sketches, and photographs, among other materials. Major subjects include the U.S. wood industry, wood technology, and forest research. Major correspondents include the Navy Bureau of Ships, Swift and Company, J.P. Perry, J. George Harrar, and the Brunswick Pulp Research Fund. English.

Collection includes correspondence, papers, photographs, and other documents related to Ellwood S. Harrar's career as a professor of forestry and Dean of the School of Forestry at Duke University. It is organized into the following series: Series 1, Personal, 1928-1975; Series 2, Duke University, 1951-1974; and Series 3, Correspondence, 1946-1974.

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Charles Roy Hauser papers, 1924-1969 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Charles R. Hauser was a 40 year faculty member at Duke University. He came to Duke as an instructor in Chemistry in 1929. He was appointed to full professor in 1946 and was named a James B. Duke professor of chemistry in 1961. Collection primarily consists of abstracts of articles which Hauser was co-author. Materials in the collection date from 1924 to 1969.

Collection primarily consists of abstracts of articles which Hauser was co-author. Collection also contains a few personal items including his transcript from the University of Florida-Gainesville, the final examination program for his Ph.D., commemorative certificate for the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, and a letter offering the position of Instructorship in Chemistry at Duke University.

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John Franklin Heitman papers, 1863 - 1911 2.6 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

John Franklin Heitman (1840-1904) was professor of Trinity College in Randolph County from 1883 to 1892, and Acting President of the school from 1884-1887. He later served as Headmaster of Trinity High School from 1892 to 1895. He also published several periodicals during his career. The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications such as the North Carolina Education Journal and the North Carolina Home Journal, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh. English.

The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Much of the material dates from the 1884-1887 period in which Heitman served as Acting President of Trinity College. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh.

This collection is arranged into two series. The first, Correspondence, dates from 1863 to 1894, with one letter from 1911. It includes both personal and professional correspondence, and is arranged chronologically. The second series, Bound Volumes and Other Material, includes a Civil War diary, grade books from Trinity High School, financial and legal documents related to Trinity College, and publications edited by Heitman, as well as a sampling of other types of print materials. This series is arranged alphabetically by topic.

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Mildred L. Hendrix papers, 1951 - 1968 6 Linear Feet

Mildred Hendrix (1905-1985) was the Chapel Organist and University Organist at Duke University from 1944 to 1967 and Professor of Music from 1944 to 1969. The papers include correspondence, certificates, general subject files, recital materials, photographs, and other programs related to her career as an organist and organ instructor at the University. Major subjects in this collection are music for chapel services, organ instruction and performance, scholarly study of the organ, Duke University Chapel programming, and the Duke University Music Department. English.

Papers contain personal correspondence, correspondence with organ students concerning practice times and lesson arrangements, records of works played during sermons, clippings and biographical information on organists invited to perform at Duke, photographs, course syllabi, evaluation of potential students, and correspondence and conference material relating to professional organizations. Also contains bulletins and minutes for Music Department faculty meetings (ca. 1960-1967).

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Franklin Simpson Hickman papers, 1930-1964 0.5 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Franklin Simpson Hickman served as a Professor in the Divinity School from 1927 until he retired in 1953. The collection contains sermons, bulletins, correspondence, and printed material authored by Hickman and ranges in date from 1930-1964.

Contains sermons, bulletins, correspondence, and printed material authored by Hickman. The collection ranges in date from 1930-1964.

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Douglas Greenwood Hill papers, 1947-1961 0.5 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Douglas Hill was a Professor of Chemistry at Duke University from 1931-1968. His specialty was high temperature and solid-state chemistry. The collection includes correspondence, technical papers, reprints and other materials and ranges in date from 1947-1961 and includes undated material.

The collection includes typescripts of scientific papers, related correspondence and graphs. It ranges in date from 1947-1961 and includes undated materials.

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Frederic B. M. Hollyday papers, 1943-1971 2 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Frederic Hollyday was a professor in the Dept. of History from 1956-1982. The collection includes meeting minutes, memoranda and relating to his research and administrative duties and ranges in date from 1943-1971.

The collection includes personal, professional and official material, primarily correspondence and memoranda, concerning Holly's training and his subsequent career in Duke's History Dept. and his service on the Honors Committee of the Undergraduate Faculty Council. There is correspondence with Harold Lewis, E. M. Carroll and other historians which documents the way in which the department sought to bring along young scholars; other letters illustrate concerns the faculty had over matters such as segregation and race relations in the 1950s and 1960s. Some letters describe preparations for E. M. Carroll's Festschrift. There is a small amount of family correspondence and material relating to Hollyday's teaching and professional activities, such as National Archives conferences and the Southern Historical Association. Also included are the records of the Undergraduate Faculty Council Committee on Honors which Hollyday chaired in the late 1960s and probably received records from his predecessors. The collection ranges in date from 1943-1971.

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Holland Holton papers, 1859 - 1956 20.5 Linear Feet — 20500 Items

Correspondence and subject files of Holland Holton (1888-1947), relating to his roles as Professor of History and Science Education, Director of the Summer Session, and Head of the Department of Education at Duke University, and as the first editor of Southern Association Quarterly. Major subjects include the Duke University Dept. of Education and Summer Session, study and teaching of education, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. English.

The majority of the collection is made up of correspondence and subject files of Holland Holton. The papers are grouped into four broad categories: Summer Session, Dept. of Education, Southern Association Quarterly, and Personal papers.

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Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

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Calvin Bryce Hoover (1897-1974) was an economist, a scholar, and a leader in public service. A member of the Duke faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1966, Hoover served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1937-1957, and Dean of the Graduate School from 1938-1948. Hoover is widely accepted as the founder of the field of comparative economics. Materials include correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials. Major subjects of the collection are the economic conditions in the Soviet Union, Germany, and the United States in the 20th century; the administration of an academic department during wartime; Soviet economic policy; Soviet politics and government; the formation of New Deal agricultural policies in the South; and the Office of Strategic Services. English, German, and Russian.

The Calvin Bryce Hoover papers span the years 1922-1970, with the bulk falling between 1929 and 1968. The collection is arranged into nine series: Correspondence; Writings; Academic Materials; Professional Associations; Government Service; Subject Files; Audio-Visual Material; Personal; and Printed Material. The collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials.

The first series, Correspondence, contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically, except for Box 27 which contains correspondence from or about the National Planning Association. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

The second series, Writings, includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence. The third series, Academic Material, includes departmental files, course files, and other materials associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. The series includes material about the Economics Dept., professors, courses taught by Hoover, correspondence, theses, and other files. The fourth series, Professional Associations, includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

The fifth series, Government Service, includes general subject files, files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Cooperation Administration, and correspondence. The sixth series, Subject Files, includes general topical files. The seventh series, Audio-Visual Material, includes photographs and audio reels. The eighth series, Personal, includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to Hoover's wife, Faith.

The ninth series, Printed Material, includes publications not authored by Hoover. There are a fair number of these in German and Russian.

This collection contains materials that would lend itself to many areas of research interests. Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) which offers a unique picture of the work of the O.S.S. in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.

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Ellen Huckabee papers, 1924-1979 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Ellen Huckabee held a variety of administrative leadership positions during her more than 20 years at the Woman's College, including Assistant Dean, Associate Dean, and Dean of Undergraduate Instruction. This collection documents Huckabee's career and her strong interest in fostering education in women through travel. Her interest in understanding generational differences and their significance in effectively educating students is highlighted here. Her post-retirement civic participation is captured in her formal statement at a public meeting in 1979 against the proposed East-West Freeway in Durham. The collection ranges in date from 1924-1979.

The papers include correspondence, much of it in conjunction with her interests in students' study abroad; newspaper clippings on a variety of topics, including her promotion to Acting Dean at Duke Woman's College; text from presentations, including her papers on the modern student and on Horace Williams; literature on women's education; photos and official papers from her World War II service as a WAVE and as a member of the Naval Reserve; a sizeable collection of congratulatory cards and letters following her promotion to Acting Dean at the Woman's College at Duke; travel brochures; printed material from the 1961 national AAUW convention; and personal testimony and printed material related to the Durham East-West Freeway controversy.

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Howard E. Jensen Papers, 1937-1970 0.5 Linear Feet

Howard E. Jensen was a sociology professor at Duke from 1931-1958. The Howard E. Jensen papers include correspondence, writings and articles, and reports related to Howard Jensen's research and work in sociology.

The Howard E. Jensen papers include a bound volume of birthday greetings by colleagues and friends from around the country given to Jensen in 1954, correspondence from 1952-1970, criminology class reading list, reprints of Jensen's articles including "Planning for the Blind in North Carolina," which appeared in THE NEW OUTLOOK (May 1952) and several others, material concerning Durham, including the 1950/51 annual report and a series of articles written by Jensen for the Durham Morning Herald, a report on the Daisy Scarborough Home, Inc. (May 1942), genealogical information, and orientation-related items for foreign students at Duke in 1952.

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Frederick Joerg papers, circa 1942-1967 3 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Frederick Joerg joined Duke University in 1948 as an assistant professor of Economics. He later became a professor of Business Administration and Forest Management, and he worked in university administration as the Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Assistant Provost for Academic Administration starting in the 1960s. Joerg retired in 1983. Material includes lecture notes, papers concerning the Southeastern Personnel Conference, and papers related to Joerg's administrative duties at Duke.

Material includes lecture notes, papers concerning the Southeastern Personnel Conference, and papers related to Joerg's administrative duties at Duke.

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Barney Lee Jones papers, 1957-1995 1.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Barney Lee Jones was born in Raleigh, NC on June 11, 1920, the only child of Barney Lee Jones and Gladys Estelle Upshur. He worked as an instructor in the Department of Religion from 1948-1950. In 1953, Barney returned to Duke for the rest of his professional career. He served as Chaplain to the University until 1956 when he moved into the administration and instructional arenas as Assistant Dean of Trinity College and Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion. He received his PhD from the Divinity School in 1958. The collection contains materials donated by Dr. Barney Jones, including his memories of Duke from 1930-1960, correspondence, material from the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences meetings, and clippings. The material ranges in dates from 1957-1995.

Contains materials donated by Dr. Barney Jones, including his memories of Duke from 1930-1960, correspondence, material from the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences meetings, and clippings. The material ranges in dates from 1957-1995.

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Charles E. Jordan papers, 1942 - 1966 28.5 Linear Feet

Charles E. Jordan (1901-1974) served Duke as Assistant Secretary from 1925 to 1941, as Secretary from 1941 to 1957, as Chairman of the Athletic council from 1949 to 1963, and as Vice President for University Relations from 1946 to 1966. He was also active in community organizations, including the Durham County and North Carolina Boards of Education and various Methodist Church organizations. Jordan retired from Duke in 1966. The collection includes correspondence, subject files, audiotape, and other records relating to administrative and athletic matters at Duke University. Major subjects include scholarships, public relations, intercollegiate athletics (NCAA, ACC, Southern Conference, Duke Athletic Council, and Duke Athletic Association), the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program, the Woman's College, and university publications. There are also materials relating to the proceedings of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church and to educational matters in Durham and North Carolina. English.

The collection includes correspondence, subject files, audiotape, and other records relating to administrative and athletic matters at Duke University. Major subjects include scholarships, public relations, intercollegiate athletics (NCAA, ACC, Southern Conference, Duke Athletic Council, and Duke Athletic Association), the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program, the Woman's College, and university publications. There are also materials relating to the proceedings of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church and to educational matters in Durham and North Carolina.

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William Klenz papers, 1944-1965 2.0 Linear Feet

William Klenz was an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Aesthetics, Art, and Music from 1947-1966. Collection contains sheet music and an unpublished manuscript by William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960. A later addition from Klenz's mentee and collaborator, Geoffrey Simon, contains manuscripts for Pacem in Terris, a cantata for mixed voices and organ (dated 1965), as well as an original performing score for Toccata ("Carillon"), dedicated to Simon (dated 1959 and 1962).

The collection consists of manuscript music and sheet music composed by Klenz, as well as supporting materials for some of the performances and some background information and a personal characterization of Klenz. The unpublished manuscript of William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960, was donated to the Archives by a former student of Klenz.

The 2021 accession contains two additional manuscripts: first, Pacem in Terris, cantata for mixed voices and organ. Texts for Pacem in Terris were selected by Klenz from biblical and rabbinical texts cited by Rabbi Everett Gendler in his The Revolutionary Truism (The Saturday Review, February 13, 1965). The first performance of Pacem in Terris was conducted by Geoffrey Simon at American University (Washington, DC) on November 21, 1965. The material consists of the original manuscript, including an additional Intermezzo not in first manuscript; also contains one performing copy from premiere; one copy (scored in Sibelius) from a later performance; and one copy of program from the premiere.

Also donated in 2021 was an original performing score (copy of manuscript) of Toccata ("Carillon"), for organ, V-19-1959. This score was dedicated to the donor (see final page with Klenz signature, date, and "for G.S."). Its first performance was in Berlin, Germany, at the Neutempelhof Kirche on August 18, 1962.

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Peter H. Klopfer papers, 1957-1980s 58.5 Linear Feet

Peter Klopfer is a Professor in the Department of Biology (previously known as Zoology). This collection contains ledger books and information relating to grants and research proposals, ranging in date from 1957-1971.

Contains materials from the many grants Professor Klopfer received to fund his animal-behavior research. Included are ledger books, correspondence, research and grant paperwork, including applications. The collection ranges in date from 1957-1971.

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Claudia Koonz papers, 1992-1999 0.5 Linear Feet

Claudia Koonz is an emeritus professor of history at Duke University, whose research has focused on Nazi Germany and on ethnic hatreds and fears. The Claudia Koonz papers include some records related to the Refugee Action Project and a proposed center for research on human security.

The Claudia Koonz papers include some records related to the Refugee Action Project and a proposed center for research on human security. The collection includes correspondence, reports, emails, and other materials.

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Paul Jackson Kramer papers, 1856 - 1994 (bulk 1927-1974) 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

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Wladyslaw W. Kulski papers, 1933-1987 7 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Wladyslaw W. Kulski was born in Warsaw, Poland on July 27, 1903. After earning his doctorate, Dr. Kulski served as diplomat and an educator. He taught Political Science at Duke University from 1964 until his retirement in 1973. He died May 16, 1989. Materials include correspondence, pamphlets, manuscripts, course notes, notebooks, photographs, printed matter and a scrapbook. The collection ranges in date from 1710-1987 and is in English, Polish, French and German.

Contains correspondence, diplomatic papers, conference papers, articles, printed matter and other materials related to Dr. Kulski's role as a Polish diplomat before and during World War II and as a lecturer and teacher of Political Science after the war. The materials, approximately half of which are in Polish, pertain to Slavic Studies, Soviet politics and government, and issues in European diplomacy and politics before, during and after World War II. The collection includes hand- and typed-written manuscripts in Polish, English, French and German and materials by and about his brother, Julian E. (1905-1988), including a memoir of Stefan Starzynski, mayor of Warsaw. Also included is the correspondence of Antonina Kulski, largely in Polish with a few in English and French. Her letters that largely cover the Kulski's time in London during World War II and consists of communication with Polish soldiers, namely Kazimierz Domaszewski and Bohdan Brzozowski. There are also some photographs of presumably Polish soldiers during World War II and likely Kulksi family members and friends. There is also a scrapbook of clippings and correspondence. Material ranges in date from 1710-1987, with the bulk covering 1933-1969.

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Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

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Creighton Lacy papers, 1952-1988 1 Linear Foot — 1000 Items

Creighton Lacy has seved as a professor at Duke University Divinity School since 1953. The collection contains correspondence, reports, sermons, directories, memoranda, printed matter and clippings.

The collection contains correspondence, reports, sermons, directories, memoranda, printed matter and clippings. The papers include programs for the annual Symposium on Christian Missions sponsored by the Divinity school and its Missions Committee. There are several folders on Duke alumni who were active in the missions of the Methodist and other churches, particularly those in the Far East. Also included are manuscripts, memoranda, and clippings concerning the Nixon Library controversy of 1981, a civil rights sit-in at Watts Grill in Chapel Hill in 1964 and clippings and newspapers about student unrest at Duke and other campuses between 1968-1970.

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John Tate Lanning papers, 1926-1976 36 Linear Feet

John Tate Lanning (1902-1976) was a historian, colonial Latin America scholar, and Duke University Professor of History. This collection includes correspondence, manuscript materials, committee notes, student papers, newsletters, conference materials, curriculum materials, travel diaries, interview transcriptions, and field research notes. Major subjects include the Duke University Department of History, Duke University Research Council, Hispanic American Historical Review, Latin American library resources, student and teaching of Latin American history, research in the social sciences, and Latin American colleges and universities. English.

Contains personal and professional papers relating to John Tate Lanning's career as an educator, historian, and scholar of Latin American history. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscript materials, committee notes, student papers, newsletters, conference materials, curriculum materials, travel diaries, interview transcripts, and field research notes. Includes materials pertaining to Lanning's editorship of the Hispanic-American Historical Review, interactions with the journal's managing editors, Duke University's Research Council, and the Lanning family. Also contains a diary Lanning kept during a research trip in England, Spain, and France, 1926 October-1927 May. Materials range in date from 1926-1976.