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Collection
William Thomas Laprade was Professor of History at Trinity College (now Duke University) from 1909 to 1953 and Chair of the Department of History from 1938 to 1952. Papers contain personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Major subjects include William Thomas Laprade, history of Trinity College, Trinity College Press, Duke University Press, Duke University Department of History, Duke University libraries, The South Atlantic Quarterly, the American Association of University Professors, study and teaching of European history, American Historical Association, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, Kiwanis Club of Durham, and Phi Beta Kappa. Major subjects of correspondence include family life, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional activities of William Thomas Laprade, educator, historian, editor, and civic leader in the Duke University community. Papers include correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters. Materials include research and manuscript materials for books on 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, as well as a letter from Anthony Eyre to his brother-in-law, Sir John Newton, English mathematician and astronomer (1660). Correspondence concerns professional interests, Laprade's family, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. A complete alphabetical index to named persons in this collection, including correspondence, can be found in Box 16. The oversize box contains materials from the Laprade collection that were formerly housed in the map cabinets and the General Oversize collection. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Personal and Laprade family letters are concerned with family and local news, health, church meetings, grain production at the family mill in Rivermont, Va., the 1908 presidential election, and Laprade's father's voting machine invention. From about 1902 to 1904, Laprade participated in a large network of correspondence centered in the Weekly Courier-Journal newspaper of Louisville, Ky. Students wrote in, under pseudonyms, to discuss their ideals and problems. Other correspondence subjects include the effects of World War I and World War II on the Laprade family.

Collection

Hersey Everett Spence papers, 1794; 1904-1973 2.88 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Hersey Everett Spence was a minister, educator, and writer. After graduating from Trinity College in 1908 he spent ten years in the pastorate before returning to his alma mater in 1918 as Professor of Religious Education and Biblical Literature. The collection contains correspondence, writings (poems, plays, eulogies by Smith), clippings, a sound recording, and other printed material reflecting the opinions and career of H.E. Spence. The materials in the collection range in date from 1794; 1904-1973; with the bulk of the materials dating from 1938 to 1970.

The Hersey Everett Spence papers contain correspondence, writings (poems, plays, eulogies by Smith), clippings, a sound recording, and other printed material reflecting the opinions and career of H.E. Spence. Spence was noted for his outspokenness on the state of the University and on matters such as desegregation (he was not in favor) and athletics (he was in favor). Other subjects present include: biography and family genealogy; the Methodist Retirement Home; and the Duke Memorial Methodist Church (both in Durham, NC). The collection includes over 100 unpublished poems; a copy of Spence's "When Preacher's Meet", a volume concerning the NC Pastor's School; the typescript of "I Remember" (1954) [400 pages, titled "Fifty Years of Alma Mater"]; and a taped interview (12 June 1970; no transcript). The materials in the collection range in date from 1794; 1904-1973; with the bulk of the materials dating from 1938 to 1970.

Collection
John Shelton Curtiss was a professor emeritus of history at Duke University, specializing in Russian history and civilization. The collection includes professional and personal papers, as well as extensive documentation of Curtiss family history and genealogy.

The collection is divided into three series: professional papers, personal papers, and family history and genealogy.

Curtiss' professional papers are exclusively from after his retirement as a faculty member at Duke University. They include drafts of scholarly articles written by him after his retirement, book reviews and publication information for his book Russia's Crimean War, a C.V., and recommendations for former students.

His personal papers are much more extensive, covering the breadth of his activities during his retirement. Included is his work with a number of local organizations, such as the Durham County Public Library, the Kiwanis Club, the Ruritan society, and the Lebanon Volunteer Fire Department. Also included are personal correspondence, both with family and acquaintances, letters to congress, political activism, documents pertaining to land he partly owned in Texas, and an autobiography he wrote concerning his life in retirement.

The final series is materials pertaining to Curtiss family history and genealogy. These include family trees, baptismal and marriage certificates, correspondence dating back to the early 19th century between various distant relations, and a number of materials which appear to have belonged to his father, Harlow C. Curtiss. Photographs of many family members are present. Also included are photographs of a trip to Moscow John and Edna Curtiss took in 1955. The bulk of the material concerns the Curtiss' line, but some materials concerning the family history of Edna Sutter Curtiss are also included. Most material is manuscript, but at the end of the series are a number of bound volumes concerning family history in Connecticut and New England, as well as a copy of the complete works of Turgenev written in Russian.

Collection
John Spencer Bassett, a professor in the History Department of Trinity College from 1893-1906, was a renowned educator and advocate of freedom of expression. A native of North Carolina, Bassett received his A.B. from Trinity College in 1888 and his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University in 1894. He returned to Trinity College to teach and was active in teaching, writing and collecting southern Americana. Bassett began publication of an annual series of Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society; founded the honorary society 9019, a precursor to Phi Beta Kappa; founded and edited the scholarly journal, the South Atlantic Quarterly; and encouraged his students to publish and fostered their interests in Southern history. In 1903, Bassett published an article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy in the South Atlantic Quarterly, that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. Bassett's views brought on a controversy that became known as the Bassett Affair that helped to establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States. The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. English.

The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. The correspondence (1893-1917) includes a copy of a 1911 letter to Charles Frances Adams in which Bassett gives his account of the Bassett Affair. Other correspondents include Oswald G. Villard, William Kenneth Boyd, Edwin Mims, and William E. Dodd. Much of the original correspondence concerns affairs of the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association. Clippings ([1802]-1896) include articles about North Carolina politics, Civil War history, the Bassett Affair, Trinity College matters, race relations, the media, and education. The manuscripts include the autobiography of Jessie Lewellin Bassett, wife of John Spencer Bassett, in which she describes her life from 1866 until her marriage to Bassett in 1892; a copy of the paper, "How to Collect and Preserve Historical Material," that Bassett presented to the State Historical Association on Oct. 23, 1900; and John L. Woodward's Ph.B. thesis, "Causes and Progress of the Revolutionary Movement in North Carolina," (1894).

The bulk of John Spencer Bassett's personal papers can be found in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress.

Collection
Lewis Chase taught in the English Department at Duke University beginning in 1929. It is unclear when/if he left the University. He died in 1937. The collection largely includes material pertaining to Chase's research on writer Edgar Allan Poe. It ranges in date from 1807-1941.

The collection includes correspondence pertaining to Chase's publications and research on Edgar Allan Poe's works, Chase's research notes, typescripts of Poe-related correspondence found in libraries, clippings, postcards and other memorabilia relating to Edgar Allan Poe. It also includes photographs, mostly commercial prints, of people and places related to Poe's life, including London scenes, the Poe cottage and Seagate Castle. Correspondence files are extremely brittle. Among the correspondents are Edmund Gosse, John Erskine and J. E. Spingarn. There is also an unidentified handwritten travel diary dated September 1858, which was found in the Woman's College Library, and believed to have been left by Chase. It details travels in New England and China. Paperclips damaging the files were replaced, as were disintegrating folders. The collection ranges in date from 1807-1941.

Collection

Lionel Stevenson papers, 1808-1989, bulk 1911-1974 25.25 Linear Feet — 30,300 items

Lionel Stevenson was James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University from 1955-1971. This collection contains artwork, canadiana, clippings, correspondence, course material, diaries, financial records, manuscripts, photographs, and scrapbooks regarding the life and work of Lionel Stevenson. The material ranges in date from 1808-1989, bulk from 1911-1974.

The papers of Lionel Stevenson span the years 1808 to 1989, although the bulk of the material dates from the 1920s to 1973. They consist of canadiana; clippings; correspondence; course material; general files; manuscripts and notes; notes, papers, and research; non-textual material; organizations; oversized materials; and writings. The collection documents Lionel Stevenson's work as both an author and a professor, as well as an avid collector of news clippings and expert on the Cary family. Subject areas include genealogy of the Cary family, Canadian authors and poets, and photographs, and nineteenth century English literary criticism.

The General Files series is mainly comprised of personal files, like financial records and general miscellany. The Non-Textual Material series contains over 230 cartes de visite photographs, chiefly of the Cary family, as well as other various photographs and pictures. The bulk of the Writings series contains mainly articles and drafts. Notable in this series is Stevenson's Masters thesis. The series Course Material contains folders of syllabi, lecture notes, and miscellaneous papers relating to courses he taught. The Notes, Papers, and Research series contains research notes relating to the writings of Lionel Stevenson. Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent. Notable in this series are letters from literary figures Joyce Cary, Bliss Carman, and Evelyn Waugh. The Organizations contains papers regarding the various groups Stevenson belonged to, notably the Canadian Authors Association, Dickens Fellowship, Modern Language Association, and the PEN Congress. The Manuscript and Notes series contains miscellaneous papers and a manuscript of Revolt Among the Artists. The bulk of the Clippings series are clippings removed from Correspondence and arranged alphabetically. The Diaries series is two boxes filled with Stevenon's personal diaries kept from 1919 to 1974. The Oversized Material series contains clippings and papers removed from their respective series, as well as three scrapbooks of clippings, a novel, audio cassette, and a poster for an essay contest. Canadiana contains miscellaneous Canadian memorabilia that Stevenson collected. The last series Oversized Artwork contains paintings and pictures that were formerly housed in the general oversized collection.

Collection

Nora Campbell Chaffin papers, 1835-1981 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Nora Chaffin was on the history faculty at Duke University from 1935-1944. Her collection contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Collection
Seven scrapbooks of clippings related largely to Greensboro Female College and Trinity College (both Randolph County, NC and Durham, NC). Also included is a volume which lists articles related to North Carolina history.

This collection contains 7 scrapbooks and one notebook listing articles. It is unclear as to which Peacock created them, as both Dred and Ella had strong ties to the main subjects: Greensboro Female College and Trinity College (now Duke University). The scrapbooks include the Ethel Carr Peacock Memorial bookplate and consists largely of clippings and event programs as they pertain to both colleges. There are also clippings related to topics such as the American Civil War and local news and dignitaries. These volumes are fragile and should be handled with care. The notebook contains a list of newspaper and magazine articles on North Carolina history compiled by Dred Peacock and at least one other individual, possibly Charles Lee Raper.

Collection

Frank Allan Hanna papers, 1850-1936 2.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Frank Allan Hanna was a professor of economics at Duke University from 1948-1972. The collection contains largely bound materials from the Wisconsin State Income Tax Study Hanna worked on but it also includes Hanna family genealogy and ledger books for "Negro Accounts" from the antebellum period and galley proofs for one of Hanna's publications. The collection ranges in date from 1850-1936.

This collection contains the work of the Wisconsin Income Tax Commission and its studies between 1929 and 1936. A master tabulating procedures manual is included. Two daybooks from South Carolina, 1850-1855, contain accounts of a store which kept special accounts for African-Americans. The volumes on the genealogy of the Hanna family are to be kept with the papers at the request of Professor Hanna. A set of galley proofs for Institutional Economics by John R. Commons has corrections by Professor Hanna. The collection ranges in date from 1850-1936.

Collection

William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

Collection
William Gannaway was a Professor of Latin and History at Trinity College in Randolph County from 1857 until his retirement in 1892. The collection includes account books and grade books as well as a small amount of correspondence and notes. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

The collection largely includes grade books and account books. These consist of personal account books (Gannaway, like many other teachers, was also a working farmer) and college account books. They have not been separated. The is a report to the Trustees from 1864 as well as miscellaneous memoranda, receipts, financial records and notes, and a small amount of correspondence, including a letter from E. F. Finch in 1888 that concerns the financial affairs of Charles Heitman and their effects on Trinity College. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

Collection
Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

Collection

Holland Holton papers, 1859 - 1956 20.5 Linear Feet — 20500 Items

Correspondence and subject files of Holland Holton (1888-1947), relating to his roles as Professor of History and Science Education, Director of the Summer Session, and Head of the Department of Education at Duke University, and as the first editor of Southern Association Quarterly. Major subjects include the Duke University Dept. of Education and Summer Session, study and teaching of education, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. English.

The majority of the collection is made up of correspondence and subject files of Holland Holton. The papers are grouped into four broad categories: Summer Session, Dept. of Education, Southern Association Quarterly, and Personal papers.

Collection

John Franklin Heitman papers, 1863 - 1911 2.6 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

John Franklin Heitman (1840-1904) was professor of Trinity College in Randolph County from 1883 to 1892, and Acting President of the school from 1884-1887. He later served as Headmaster of Trinity High School from 1892 to 1895. He also published several periodicals during his career. The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications such as the North Carolina Education Journal and the North Carolina Home Journal, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh. English.

The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Much of the material dates from the 1884-1887 period in which Heitman served as Acting President of Trinity College. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh.

This collection is arranged into two series. The first, Correspondence, dates from 1863 to 1894, with one letter from 1911. It includes both personal and professional correspondence, and is arranged chronologically. The second series, Bound Volumes and Other Material, includes a Civil War diary, grade books from Trinity High School, financial and legal documents related to Trinity College, and publications edited by Heitman, as well as a sampling of other types of print materials. This series is arranged alphabetically by topic.

Collection
Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

Collection

Samuel Fox Mordecai papers, 1869-1985 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Samuel Fox Mordecai (1852-1927) was a lawyer who served as Dean of Trinity College Law School from around 1905 to 1927. The collection covers mainly the period between 1871 and Mordecai's death in 1927 and largely consists of correspondence and some law-themed periodicals.

Contents of the Samuel Fox Mordecai Papers span from 1869 to 1985 with the bulk dates 1871-1923 and include correspondence, telegrams, receipts, grade reports, volumes, clippings, other printed material, and photographs. The Papers are arranged into three series: Correspondence and Miscellany, 1869-1985; Printed Material, 1912-1932; and Photographs, 1938 and undated. The correspondence is arranged chronologically. Most of the collection was arranged by the former Manuscript Department before being transferred to University Archives.

Collection

John W. Alspaugh papers, 1875 - 1898 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

John Wesley Alspaugh was a lawyer, editor, and civic leader in Winston-Salem, N.C. A key supporter of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C), he served as chairman of the Board of Trustees and as a member of the Committee of Management, which ran the school from 1884 to 1887. Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management. English.

The John W. Alspaugh Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management.

The letters of the other two members of the Committee of Management, Julian S. Carr and James A. Gray, concern the finances of Trinity during the critical struggle for the institution's survival, when many pledges to an endowment fund were unpaid. Notes signed by the Committee of Management had to be met, speakers approved, scholarships considered, teachers employed, insurance paid, meetings arranged, and reports prepared, among other business.

In 1886, the question of employing Dr. John B. Bobbitt as collection agent for Trinity was debated. The quest for funds was hampered by the impossibility of collecting a loan to Charles L. Heitman. Meanwhile, the executor of the estate of Braxton Craven was pressing for settlement of debts owed by the college.

With the arrival of President John Franklin Crowell in 1887, the Alspaugh correspondence diminishes, although he remained as chairman of the Board of Trustees for many years. Still haunting the Trustees was the debt against Mrs. Craven for the college bells. John B. Bobbitt was trying to secure payment for his services as a collector of notes pledged to Trinity. In 1889, S. L. Leary of Charlotte, N.C. offered his services as an architect for the new buildings needed when the college considered moving to Raleigh, N.C.

Two broadsides, dated 1884 and 1886, contain reports of the Committee of Management of Trinity College. Also included is the annual report made by Chairman of the Faculty William H. Pegram to the President and Board of Trustees of Trinity College.

Collection

W. H. Pegram papers, 1876 - 1928 1.75 Linear Feet — 1700 Items

William Howell Pegram (1846-1928) was a student, professor, and administrator at Trinity College (N.C.). He moved with the school from Randolph County to Durham County (N.C.), and remained active as Trinity College evolved into Duke University. The W.H. Pegram Papers include correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material. His relationship with Braxton Craven, both professionally and personally, is detailed. Among the subjects in the collection are Pegram's main academic interest, chemistry, and the administration of Trinity College in both Randolph and Durham counties. English.

The W. H. Pegram Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material related to Pegram's career at Trinity College and later Duke University. The first series, Personal, is a brief series containing clippings and other material regarding Pegram's career and his death in 1928. The second series Correspondence, contains letters to and from Pegram, mainly regarding administrative issues at Trinity College. There are also some letters of thanks from former students. This series is arranged chronologically. The third series is Notebooks, and contains notebooks used by Pegram for a variety of purposes: to record the attendance and grades of his students, to prepare Sunday school lessons, to work on chemistry problems, and to write essays. The notebooks are arranged by title or subject, when available, then date. The fourth series, Writings, contains several essays prepared by Pegram, as well as shorter pieces. This series is also organized by title, when available, and then date. The last series, Trinity College, contains a variety of materials related to the history of the school. These materials are not all directly related to Pegram, but they provide a historical context for his other materials. It contains clippings, articles, financial papers, and print materials about the school. These papers are organized alphabetically.

Collection

Gilbert Theodore Rowe papers, 1878-1965 1 Linear Foot — 750 Items

Gilbert Theodore Rowe was born in Salisbury, NC on September 10, 1875. His father was Joseph Columbus Rowe, a Methodist minister. He received his A.B. and D.D. from Trinity College in 1895 and 1914, respectively. He earned his S.T.D. at Temple University in 1905 and was awarded a Litt.D. from Duke University in 1925. In 1928, he returned to Duke University as Professor and Chair of Christian Doctrine and remained until his retirement in 1949. The collection includes correspondence, clippings and Dr. Rowe's sermon notes, as well as material pertaining to his father, Joseph Columbus Rowe. The collection ranges in date from 1878-1965

Materials include Dr. Rowe's sermon notes, correspondence, and clippings. His sermon notes are largely handwritten and often appear on the back of other material, such as correspondence, letterhead, envelopes, church bulletins, and programs. The collection also includes some material concerning Dr. Rowe's father, Joseph Columbus Rowe (1848-1920). The collection ranges in dates from 1878-1965.

Collection

Julian Shakespeare Carr papers, 1880-1982 0.5 Linear Feet — approx. 85 items

Julian Carr was a tobacco and textile manufacturer and civic leader of Durham (Durham Co.), N.C. He also served on the Board of Trustees of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). The collection includes material related to Carr's service on the Board of Trustees as well as personal family papers. The material ranges in date from 1880-1982.

The collection includes about 72 items which cover the period when Carr served as Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.) and on the Committee of Management with John Wesley Alspaugh and James Alexander Gray. The bulk of this correspondence deals with attempts by Carr, largely unsuccessful, to call in notes pledged to the endowment of the College. There are significant letters from Alspaugh, Gray, and John Franklin Crowell, as well as a Treasurer's Report (circa 1885), other financial matters, and lists of Methodist Church assessments made to support Trinity College. Other subjects treated include the settlement of an estate, bills for the widow of Braxton Craven, and a student petition for the replacement of Professor W. T. Gannaway. There are also letters from John W. Sanborn, a candidate for the College's presidency. The other items in the collection include clippings and a photograph pertaining to the Carr family and homes; a farm journal (1910-1911) with instructions from Carr to his manager, B. S. Skinner, and samples of chewing and twist tobacco and handmade cigarettes produced in the 1880s at W. T. Blackwell's Durham tobacco company.

Collection
Online
Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.

Collection

Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

Collection
William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

Collection

W. Bryan Bolich papers, 1891-1972 5 Linear Feet — 5,000 Items

W. Bryan Bolich (1896-1977) served as a Professor of Law at Duke University from 1927 to 1966. Papers contain family memorabilia, general correspondence, photographs, an oral history, diaries, course notes, writings, drafts of statutes revisions, and clippings. Major subjects include family work at Southern Railway in Forsyth County, N.C., Duke Law School curriculum development and reorganization, Law Day, the Rhodes Scholarship, Trinity College Class of 1917 alumni activities, Law School Alumni Association, North Carolina House of Representatives, and property and alien rights laws authored with the North Carolina General Statute Commission.

Correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, diaries, certificates, correspondence and drafts of laws, miscellaneous memorabilia from Bolich's career as a Professor at Duke University Law School, student notebooks from courses taken at Trinity College and University of Oxford, and a taped memoir and 19-page transcription. Family materials include materials from Southern Railway and much correspondence between Bolich's parents during their courtship (ca 1891-1893). Political correspondence between Bolich and Richard Nixon is filed in Series 3 (Correspondence. Political).

Collection

William McDougall papers, 1892 - 1982 9.5 Linear Feet — 10000 Items

William McDougall (1871-1938), an early twentieth century psychologist, taught at Duke University from 1927 to 1938. McDougall espoused a hormic theory of psychology, emphasizing genetics and instinct over nurture. McDougall was also a strong proponent of parapsychology. The William McDougall Papers, 1892-1982, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, notebooks, photographs, diaries, drawings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Major subjects include Lamarckian experiments conducted by McDougall, the McDougall family (and sons Kenneth and Angus in particular), the study of parapsychology, the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University, the Psychology Department at Duke University, and anthropological studies in Borneo and the Torres Strait. English.

The William McDougall Papers date from 1892 to 1982, and contain McDougall's own papers as well as those of his family and other researchers. The collection is organized into three series. The first series, Professional, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the late 1920s to the late 1930s, the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Of particular note is his correspondence with other scholars in the fields of psychology and the social sciences. A card file which indexes these correspondents is available with the collection. McDougall's notes from his Lamarckian experiments on rats can also be found here, as can photograph albums from his anthropological travels in the late 1890s. The Family series contains correspondence, notebooks, photographs, clippings, writings, research and education materials, diaries, drawings, and other materials. Many materials belonging to two of McDougall's sons, Kenneth and Angus, are filed here. The third series, Other Researchers, contains writings and correspondence written by other researchers about McDougall or about McDougall's influence on psychology. These materials were not directly related to or owned by McDougall; most were generated after his death.

Collection

Elbert Russell papers, 1893 - 1968 1.3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Elbert Russell served as a Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 until 1941. Personal and professional papers contain correspondence, manuscript materials, sermons, articles and short writings, and clippings. Major subjects include Duke University Divinity School, study and teaching of the Bible, history of Quakerism, study and teaching of Quakerism, fellowship, study and teaching of pacifism, and sermons. Materials range in date from 1893-1968. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional work of Elbert Russell, Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 to 1941. In addition to his sermons, articles and books, Russell authored many poems and a play. Much of the correspondence in the collection includes references to pacifism and concerns sermons, teaching, preaching, Quakerism, and formal publication of his writings. Some clippings and correspondence in the collection date from after Russell's death and discuss his life and work. These most likely were collected by colleagues or family members. Materials range in date from 1893-1968.

Collection

Henry R. Dwire papers, 1897-1944 1.2 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Henry R. Dwire was an alumnus of Trinity College and was appointed Duke University Vice President in 1941 and Director of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs in 1944. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, certificates and a diploma. The collection ranges in date from 1897-1944.

The collection contains Dwire's high school diploma, two certificates, correspondence, photographs, and clippings. The correspondence is congratulatory towards Dwire for his appointment as Duke University Vice President in 1941 and for the honorary degree he was awarded by Davidson College in 1943. Most of the photographs were taken at Davidson College. Most of the loose material was removed from a scrapbook after being transferred to the Archives in 1960. There is adhesive on many of the pages. The collection ranges in date from 1897-1944.

Collection
Robert Stanley Rankin (1899-1976) taught political science at Duke beginning in 1927 and was chairman of the political science department from 1949 to 1964. He retired from teaching in 1969. The collection includes departmental records, correspondence, reports, notes, student papers, questionnaires, publications, and other materials of Robert S. Rankin and the Duke University Department of Political Science. English.

The collection includes departmental records, correspondence, reports, notes, student papers, questionnaires, publications, and other materials of Robert S. Rankin and the Duke University Department of Political Science, circa 1927-1977.

Collection

Clement Vollmer papers, 1898-1983 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Clement Vollmer joined the German Languages and Literature Department at Duke University in 1926, where he remained until his retirement in 1956. In 1918, he published The American Novel in Germany. Professor Vollmer served as chair of the department during the 1950s, as president of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, and was a member of numerous academic societies. Includes correspondence, recommendations, faculty meeting minutes, German Department memoranda, grade books and department enrollment statistics. Also includes date books, address books and diaries kept by Maude Hugo Vollmer (Mrs. Clement Vollmer). Inclusive years are 1898-1983.

Contains materials related to Vollmer's career in the German Department at Duke, including correspondence, recommendations, minutes, memoranda, grade books, department enrollment, faculty appointments and wartime activities. Also includes correspondence relating to University Church services, the Academic Council and the Vigil. The rest of the collection includes address/date books and diaries (including travel diaries) kept primarily by Maude Hugo Vollmer, wife of Clement Vollmer. Also includes a list of houses (with architect names) in the Duke Forest, a New Testament, a University of Southern California handbook, a wallet full of expired oil company credit cards. Original brittle folders were replaced for preservation. Inclusive dates are 1898-1983.

Collection
Frank Clyde Brown (1870-1943) served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University, and as Comptroller and University Marshall of Duke University. He oversaw the initial construction of Duke University's West Campus and the renovation of East Campus. Brown also founded the North Carolina Folklore Society. The Frank C. Brown Papers contain correspondence, logs, diaries, reports, lantern slides, notebooks, clippings, a scrapbook, and other materials. While some papers relate to teaching and English department activities, the bulk of the collection concerns the construction of Duke University, including correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, builder and manufacturer information, construction progress reports, travel diaries of visits to other campuses, and records of James B. Duke's views on architecture and involvement in campus planning. English.

The Frank C. Brown Papers include both Personal papers and Subject files relating to his career as a student, professor, and folklorist and also to his role in the construction of the Duke University campuses. The Personal papers series includes correspondence, biographical information, writings, addresses, lectures, clippings, diaries, coursework, blueprints, and slides. It includes correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, manufacturers' literature, construction progress reports, diaries of trips made in 1924 and 1926 to look at other campuses, and a lantern slide presentation on the campus. This series contains records documenting James B. Duke's views on architecture and his involvement in the planning of the campus. Also present is a diary/scrapbook kept by Brown and President William Preston Few during a 1924 tour during which they visited some twenty colleges and universities around the Eastern United States.

The Subject files series contains the alphabetical office files of Frank C. Brown. The bulk of the files pertain to the construction of the Duke University campuses and include information on planning, design, building materials, furnishings, builders, manufacturers, and vendors. A few items interfiled in the Subject files series relate to Brown's activities as a faculty member and as a member of professional and academic organizations.

Collection

Frank Traver De Vyver papers, 1899-1980 27 Linear Feet — 15,000 Items

Frank Traver De Vyver, 1904-1980, was an economist, professor of economics, and university administrator at Duke University from 1936-1980, and Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills from 1945-1955. The Frank Traver De Vyver Papers, 1899-1980, comprise the correspondence, writings, research, administrative and managerial records, and other professional papers of the economist Frank Traver De Vyver, who was a scholar on the history of labor economics and labor movements and unions. The collection is arranged in six series. Correspondence and Personal Papers contain his personal and professional correspondence and biographical material, including a photograph album of his travel abroad and a scrapbook of his career. The Writings and Research Series contains drafts and reprints of his articles and his research on labor unions and industrial arbitration in Australia and the United States. The Department of Economics Series mainly consists of departmental correspondence and administrative records. De Vyver's work as a Duke University administrator is documented in the University Committees Series, with the largest groups of materials being from the University Planning Committee and the Educational Facilities Committee. The Subject Files cover all of De Vyver's professional activities, including his work as a professional arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association; his managerial career as Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills, Durham, N.C.; his service on government committees and boards, including the War Production Board; his scholarly work on labor economics and industrial relations, collective bargaining agreements, grievance procedures, wages, and textile workers; documents on the Textile Workers Union of America; and his work on the history of labor movements and labor unions in the United States, Australia, and South Africa. The Printed Materials Series contains reprints of his articles and a variety of other formats, including clippings, pamphlets, posters, and serials.

The Frank Traver De Vyver Papers, 1899-1980, comprise the correspondence, writings, research, administrative and managerial records, and other professional papers that De Vyver produced in a half-century career as an economist and scholar specializing in the history of labor economics, movements, and unions, as a professor of economics and a university administrator at Duke University, and as an industrial manager and arbitrator. De Vyver's papers have been arranged in the following six series. The Correspondence and Personal Papers Series primarily consists of his personal and professional correspondence, but also contains biographical material, including a photograph album of his travel abroad and a scrapbook of clippings, photographs, and printed materials about his professional career. The Writings and Research Series contains drafts and reprints of De Vyver's articles and his notes and research materials on such topics as the history of labor unions and industrial arbitration in Australia and the United States. De Vyver's writings are followed by the Department of Economics Series, which includes some teaching materials but is mainly composed of departmental correspondence and administrative records. In addition to his teaching and departmental duties, De Vyver was also very active in the administrative life of Duke University, and this part of his career is extensively documented in the University Committees Series. His work on more than twenty committees, councils, and task forces is represented here, with the largest groups of materials deriving from the University Planning Committee and one of its standing committees, Educational Facilities, which De Vyver chaired from 1962-1974. The Subject Files make up the largest series, comprising almost half the collection. These files cover the full breadth of De Vyver's professional life, not only complementing topics covered in other series but also documenting many colleagues, organizations, and subjects not represented elsewhere in the collection. The following are among the most prominent groups of materials in the Subject Files: De Vyver's work as a professional arbitrator, generally as a representative of the American Arbitration Association; his managerial career as a Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills, a textile mile formerly in Durham, N.C.; his service on various government committees and boards, including the War Production Board; his scholarly work on and professional involvement with a wide variety of subjects and organizations in the fields of labor economics and industrial relations, including collective bargaining agreements, grievance procedures, wages, and textile workers; materials about the Textile Workers Union of America; and the history of labor movements and labor unions in the United States, Australia, and South Africa. The final series of the collection consists of Printed Materials, including reprints of De Vyver's articles and a wide variety of loose research materials in such categories as clippings, pamphlets, posters, and serials.

Collection
Online
Frederick Cowper was an educator, born in Island Pond, Vermont, March 3, 1883. He received his B.A.,1906, and M.A., 1911, at Trinity College, Hartford, CT, and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, 1920. Cowper also received an L.H.D, from Trinity College in 1956. He was the author of, The Sources, Date and Style of Ille et Galeron, by Gautier d'Arras, (1922), and other works. Cowper was a professor of Romance Languages, Trinity College, Durham, NC, 1918-1924, Duke University, 1924-1952. He married Mary O. Thompson, (1881-1968) in 1909. Dr. Cowper died in Durham on January 24, 1978. There were no children. This collection contains correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, printed material, photographs and film, with bulk dates 1920-1970, produced or acquired by Professor Cowper.

This collection contains correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, printed material, photographs and film, with bulk dates 1920-1970, produced or acquired by Professor Cowper. The major subject of the collection, and of Cowper's scholarly career, is the Ille et Galeron. Other subjects in the papers concern support for liquor laws in Durham and in North Carolina generally, the genealogy of the Cowper and related families, 19th century British consuls in Latin America, civil defense volunteers, and research and teaching romance languages and literature.

Collection

Bunyan S. Womble papers, 1900-1976 3.9 Linear Feet — 1800 Items

Bunyan S. Womble, graduate of Trinity College in 1904 and Trinity Law School in 1906, served actively on the Board of Trustees from 1915-1963, and then as an emeritus trustee until his death in 1976. The collection includes correspondence, reports, several newspaper clippings, memoranda, charts, and other materials. The bulk of these materials date from 1959-1963 and concern the governance and administration of the University.

The materials within the first and second box include correspondence, reports, several newspaper clippings, memoranda, charts, and other materials. The bulk of these materials date from 1959-1963 and concern the governance and administration of the University. Among the subjects found in the papers are the building of the Law School, the Board of Trustees, the place of religion in the curriculum, the Research Triangle Institute, and the integration of the University.

The third box consists entirely of photographs. The photographs include: 8 Trinity College scenes, 31 portraits of classmates (primarily from the Trinity class of 1904), 1 portrait of John Carlisle Kilgo, 1 portrait of a baseball player (in uniform but unidentified), 1 dormitory room (circa 1904), and 30 miscellaneous and unidentified photographs. The unidentified photos appear to be mostly of family and friends, circa 1900-1910.

Minutes of the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee have been removed and placed in the Board's records. A newspaper clipping file on the Edens-Gross controversy has also been removed and placed in Small Collections.

Collection
This collection contains the papers of Dr. Fletcher Nelson, a Methodist minister and Assistant to the Dean of Development of the Duke Divinity School. It consists entirely of subject files and notes for the sermons Dr. Nelson gave during his career as a minister.

The collection consists of two series, the first of which consists of subject files containing publications related to topics on which Dr. Nelson preached. The second series consists of sermons Dr. Nelson wrote and gave while he was an active minister in Greensboro, Rutherfordton, Forest City, Morganton, and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Collection

Dorothy E. Roberts papers, 1903-1993 2.5 Linear Feet — approx. 2000 Items

Dorothy Roberts worked in the Dept. of English's administration office from 1948 until her retirement in the late 1980's-early 1990's. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed material and other items created and collected by Dorothy Roberts about the Dept. of English at Duke University. Files largely pertain to the history of the department, focusing heavily on departmental faculty. The collection ranges in date from 1903-1993.

The collection largely consists of material compiled by Roberts, who functioned as historian of the Dept. of English. Of note are the various lists of faculty, Ph.D. candidates and staff of the department over a number of years. Also included are files she maintained on faculty members, which include correspondence and clippings as well as a file Roberts kept on herself regarding her career at Duke. She also provides her impressions of key departmental staff, namely the chairmen she worked for. In 1982, Roberts donated 14 letters between her and Guy Davenport, a Duke alumnus, regarding Paris and other European cities as well of Davenport's appreciation of James Joyce and Roberts' own love of traveling abroad. Roberts' friendship with Reynolds Price is represented in the collection. There are several folders on him which include correspondence, Christmas cards, photographs, clippings, and an envelope which holds locks of Price's hair. Of particular note is a sketch Price drew of Emily Dickinson that he gave to Roberts. There is also a caricature of Ph.D. candidates, including Price, from 1962.

Collection

Arthur Sperry Pearse papers, 1904-1960 18 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Arthur Sperry Pearse (pronounced like "purse") was Professor of Zoology at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1948. Collection primarily contains papers and other items relating to his academic career: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also include landscapes, people, villages, and social customs from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and smaller groups from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the Outer Banks coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consist of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures. Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the publication Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

The Arthur Sperry Pearse papers include the professional papers and photographs of A. S. Pearse's scholarly career. His professional papers span the length of his academic career and include: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, book illustrations, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also landscapes, people, villages, and social aspects of life from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. Included are snapshots of fellow scientists in the laboratory and in the field. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the N.C. coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consists of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures.

Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the journal Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

Correspondence primarily reflects his role as editor of Ecological Monographs which includes correspondence concerning receipt of drafts for publication, recommended revisions, and future publication dates. Other prominent topics include Pearse's involvement with professional organizations, various symposiums and conferences, publications, research in Nigeria and the Yucatán, and the founding and early operations of the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina. Also, in 1938-1939, there is a series of correspondence between Pearse and President William Preston Few concerning lack of support for and conditions within the department and Pearse's consequent resignation as departmental chair.

Other materials include research notes, tables, and sketches; graduate student correspondence, plans of work, and dissertation abstracts; manuscripts of various publications authored by Pearse including Animal Ecology and his 1952 autobiography, Adventure: Trying to be an Ecologist; laboratory and field notebooks containing research notes and statistics from Nigeria, the Yucatan, Wisconsin, and various other research locations.

There are many photographic prints, nitrate and safety negatives, and glass-plate lecture slides, all documenting Pearse's research travels, particularly in Nigeria and the Yucatán, but also in Alabama, Florida, and coastal North Carolina, Japan, China, Burma, the Phillippines, Colombia, and Venezuela. Images include local flora, fauna, landscapes, villages, localized crafts and industries, and indigenous peoples, as well as maps, charts, tables, drawings, and photographs used in Pearse's lectures and publications.

Collection

Alan K. Manchester papers, 1905-1975 2 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

Alan K. Manchester (1897-1983) served as a faculty member in the Department of History at Duke University (1929-1967). Administrative positions held at Duke include Assistant Dean of Trinity College (1934), Dean of Freshmen (1935-1949), Dean of Undergraduate Studies (1949-1956), and Dean of Trinity College (1956-1964). Manchester also worked as a cultural affairs officer at the United States Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (1951-1952) and as a specialist for the U. S. State Department's International Exchange Service Program (Summers of 1954-55). Papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator. Major subjects include Latin American and South American history and economic and political relations between Brazil and Great Britain. The majority of the material is in English. Some material is in Spanish and Portuguese.

Collection consists of correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries, bulk 1929-1970. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator

Collection

Arthur M. Proctor papers, 1906 - 1967 5.5 Linear Feet — 4000 Items

Arthur Marcus Proctor (1886-1955) was a professor in the Department of Education at Duke University. He also served as Director of the Duke Summer Session for several years. The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education. English.

The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education.

Collection

Herman Salinger papers, 1909-1982 13.2 Linear Feet — 8,000 Items

Herman Salinger was a professor of German and Comparative Literature at Duke from 1955-1974. Collection includes correspondence, course and curriculum materials, poetry and manuscripts, speeches, photographs, and other materials. Also includes documents dealing with Duke activities and people, course and teaching materials, writings, and records of the Arthur Schnitzler Research Association.

Collection includes correspondence, course and curriculum materials, poetry and manuscripts, speeches, photographs, and other materials. The correspondence includes personal letters, correspondence with former students and professional correspondence. Also includes documents dealing with Duke activities and people, course and teaching materials, writings, and records of the Arthur Schnitzler Research Association.

Collection

Hiram Earl Myers papers, 1910 - 1977 4.5 Linear Feet — 4500 Items

Hiram Earl Myers was a clergyman, theologian, and educator. He was ordained as a minister in the N.C. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1918) and was an active member as pastor and theologian. In 1926, Myers joined the Duke University faculty in as professor of biblical literature. He served as Chairman of the Department of Religion (1934-1936) and as Director of Undergraduate Studies in Religion (1937-1957). The collection consists of correspondence; texts of sermons and Sunday School lessons; prayers given in Duke Chapel; records of sermons, baptisms, and marriages; notes on sermon topics; photographs; pamphlets; blueprints; and other printed material. Major subjects include Myers' activities as a clergyman, his reflections on theological issues, and his involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The collection reflects Myers' activities as a clergyman and his thoughts on theological issues. The collection consists of correspondence; texts of sermons and Sunday School lessons; prayers given in Duke Chapel; records of sermons, baptisms, and marriages; notes on sermon topics; pamphlets; and other printed material. Major subjects include Myers' activities as a clergyman, his reflections on theological issues, and his involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The Writings and Speeches Series is an important part of the collection. It includes the typed and manuscript texts of approximately three hundred sermons and Sunday School lessons given by Myers throughout his career as a minister, prayers used in Duke Chapel, and other writings.

The Correspondence Series includes correspondence with colleagues and family. Individual items of particular interest are letters from R.L. Flowers dealing with the aftermath of the deaths of James B. Duke and William Preston Few. Other correspondents include Sarah Pearson Duke, Josephus Daniels, Horace R. Kornegay, Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Y.E. Smith, William A. Erwin, and William B. Umstead. A few items within the correspondence deal with local Methodist affairs in the N.C. conference, particularly with ministerial appointments. Most of the correspondence is routine, although it occasionally reflects historical events such as the Great Depression and World War II.

Other series in the collection include Personal and Family Papers, Pastoral Records, Lake Junaluska, Duke University, and Subject Files.

Material directly related to Duke University is scanty. There are three folders of tests and examinations administered by Myers in his classes. Individual items of interest include Myers' reminiscences at the the 1960 alumni reunion and a copy of a poetic tribute to B. N. Duke by Wilbur F. Tillett of Vanderbilt University in 1928.

Collection

Katharine M. Banham papers, 1910-1995 26 Linear Feet — 20,000 Items

Katharine May Banham (1897-1995) served as a professor in the Department of Psychology at Duke University from 1946 to 1967, specializing in child psychology and development. Papers include correspondence, writings, speeches, case files and research notes, teaching materials, diaries, memorabilia, photographs, and oral history interviews of Katharine M. Banham, relating to her work in the field of psychology and her contributions to Duke University, Durham, and North Carolina. Prominent subjects include psychological experimentation, child psychology, geriatrics and gerontology, human social and emotional development, children with cerebral palsy, the Woman's College, Duke Preschool, Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, the North Carolina Psychological Association, the Durham Child Guidance Clinic, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. English.

The Katharine May Banham Papers span the years between 1910 and 1995, with the bulk occurring between 1945 and 1984. These papers include her master's theses and dissertation work, professional and academic writings, case files, and data documenting psychological experiments that culminated in the development of tests, as well as research articles and one monograph; transcripts of talks and addresses; translations of French psychological texts, teaching materials; administrative records of and records documenting her role in various civic and academic clubs and organizations; professional and personal correspondence; and personal materials including art, photographs, memorabilia, poetry and other personal writings, diaries, biographical information, legal documents, and tapes and transcripts of an oral history interview done in 1980. The main subject areas include Banham's contribution to the profession, her participation in the Duke community, and the Durham community as well as regional, national, and international communities and agencies.

The collection chiefly reflects Banham's career as a woman psychologist during a period when there was little support for women in professional or academic careers. The papers document Banham's research and teaching in three countries; her contributions in the areas of child psychology and geriatrics, particularly human social and emotional development; functioning and development of children with cerebral palsy and disabilities; the history and especially the development of psychological testing of children and adults; and parapsychological phenomena. Research and teaching materials are located within the Academic and Professional Psychology series and Duke Activities series. Materials relevant to Banham's professional development are scattered throughout all five series.

The collection is also important for the perspective it offers on the Duke University Psychology Department and the Woman's College during the 1940s to the 1960s. Information related to both as well as her role in the Admissions and scholarships Committees among other faculty committees (see the folder list located in the description of Duke Activities series), the Duke Preschool, the Duke Film Society, and the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement can be found primarily in the Duke Activities series. Material regarding the development and teaching of an infant and child psychology curriculum and a series of correspondence with graduate students are also of special interest and can be found in the Duke Activities series. Other materials relating to her contributions to the Duke Community are located in the Academic and Professional Psychology series, the Correspondence series, and the Personal Files series.

Banham's contribution to the city of Durham is reflected in the Agency and Club Participation series with the most in depth materials relating to her role in establishing the French Club, the Photographic Arts Society, the Altrusa Club, and the Committee for Successful Aging (which became the Golden Age Society and finally, the Coordinating Council for Senior Citizens), and, to a lesser degree, in the Academic and Professional Psychology series specifically in her role as one of the founding psychologists of the Durham Child Guidance Clinic. Banham co-founded the North Carolina Psychological Association in addition to being an active member and officer of other regional, national, and international organizations such as the League of Women Voters, the American Association of University Women, and the International Council of Women Psychologists.

Banham's life was defined by her professional and academic commitments and so her closest relationships were with her colleagues and the many individuals to whom she gave her time and the benefit of her professional skills. The Correspondence and personal series best reflect her tireless efforts on behalf of the people with whom she come into contact. Her papers are particularly useful as they document the period of the 1920s through the 1960s in England, Canada, and especially the United States from the perspective of a highly educated, professional woman.

Collection

W. D. Davies papers, 1911-2007 106.5 Linear Feet — 78 containers

W. D. (William David) Davies (1911-2001) was Professor of Biblical Theology at Duke University Divinity School from 1950 to 1955 and from 1966 to 1981 was George Washington Ivey Professor of Advanced Studies and Research in Christian Origins. The collection features correspondence, course materials, writings, subject files, sermon notes, books, and research notes of W. D. Davies. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The collection includes correspondence, research materials, teaching materials, photographs, and books. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The first series, containing multiple accessions, includes correspondence, manuscript materials, article reprints, student papers, lecture notes, course reading materials, sermon notes, student notebooks relating to courses taken at the University of Wales Memorial College in Brecon, general research subject files, research notes relating to teaching at Duke University, Columbia University, Princeton University, Union Theological Seminary, and Texas Christian University.

Accession UA2014-0065 contains personal and professional correspondence, scholarly materials and books from Davies' personal library. The collection also contains materials related to Davies' Feschrift, an honor celebrating Davies'contributions to the field of biblical theology.

Collection

Lambert Armour Shears papers, 1912-1959 0.5 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Lambert Shears was a professor in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literature at Duke University from 1927-1959. The collection includes syllabi, exams, lecture notes, as well as Shears' graduate student papers from Columbia University and ranges in date from 1912-1959.

Shears' collection includes lecture and research notes from his years as a graduate student and professor, final exams given at Duke, and papers written while a graduate student at Columbia. The collection ranges in date from 1912-1959.

Collection

James Cannon III papers, 1912 - 1974 4.6 Linear Feet — 4,500 Items

James Cannon III worked as an educator and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1960, serving as Dean of the Divinity School from 1951 to 1958. The Canon papers contain correspondence, manuscript drafts of sermons and publications, course materials, subject files, clippings, photographs, ephemera, and scrapbooks relating to the life and work of James Cannon III. Major subjects include biblical literature and the Bible as literature, religious education, missionary training, history of religion, Christianity, Buddhism, comparative religion, and the Cannon family, especially James Cannon, Jr. and James Cannon IV. English.

The Cannon papers were originally organized into three main files and arranged alphabetically within these files. Three series reflecting the original order were created: Personal files and family history, Writings, and Subject files. The Writings series was reorganized by type of writing into three subseries: Sermons, Articles, and Course materials. Some clippings files, reference materials, gradebooks, and duplicates were removed from the papers.

Collection
Hugo Leander Blomquist was professor and chair of the Botany Department at Duke University from 1921-1957. The collection includes correspondence between H.L. Blomquist and his wife Margaret during the 1920s and during H.L. Blomquist's service in the Army during World War I, class notes, North Carolina maps, as well as drawings and photographs of his book The Grasses of North Carolina. The collection ranges in date from 1912-2000.

Collection contains personal and professional correspondence of Hugo L. Blomquist from the years 1912 to 1961. Correspondence includes letters to his brother during Blomquist's service in the Army during World War I as well as correspondence between H.L. Blomquist and his wife Margaret Mordecai Blomquist before and after their marriage. Also includes materials related to Blomquist's time in the Army, citizenship process, maps, notes, and oversize illustrations and photographs associated with the publication of his book Grasses of North Carolina. Illustrations were removed from acidic paper wrapping and boxed for preservation.

Collection

Joseph P. Breedlove papers, 1913-1950 2 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Breedlove was appointed Librarian of Trinity College in 1898 and oversaw the growth of the libraries after Trinity expanded to become Duke University. He served as Librarian until 1939 when he was named Librarian Emeritus. The Joseph P. Breedlove papers document the expansion and management of the Duke University Library after the General Library opens in 1930. The papers contain some annual reports of the Trinity College as well as an undated Guide to the Trinity College Library. Correspondence with Library Council member B. Harvie Branscomb includes a June 14, 1937 feasibility report of the resources needed to convert the Library classification scheme from Dewey Decimal to Library of Congress. The collection also includes a history of Wiley Gray medal with a list of winners.

The bulk of the Breedlove papers document the expansion and management of the Library after the General Library opens in 1930. Some annual reports from the Trinity College era can be found in Box 1 and an undated Guide to the Trinity College Library is located in Box 3. Box 3 also contains speeches and articles by Breedlove as well as a report on library instruction for freshmen. Of particular interest is a folder in Box 1 containing Breedlove's correspondence with B. Harvie Branscomb. Branscomb was a member of the Library Council and served as Director of Libraries (a faculty appointment) from 1934 to 1941. A June 14, 1937 feasibility report of the resources needed to convert the Library classification scheme from Dewey Decimal to Library of Congress can be found in the Branscomb folder. In addition to materials about the Library, the collection also includes documentation of Breedlove's campus activities with the Trinity Class of 1898 and a history of Wiley Gray medal with a list of winners.

Collection
Ernest William Nelson (1896-1974) was a professor of history at Duke University (1926-1965). His primary interest was Italian Renaissance cultural history. Nelson founded the Durham Chamber Arts Society (1945) and was chairman from 1945-1963. Major subjects include the Duke University Dept. of History, the Chamber Arts Society, and cultural life on campus. The collection contains correspondence, financial records, lectures, reports, student papers, and other printed material. English.

The Ernest W. Nelson Records and Papers is divided into three series: Subject Files, the Chamber Arts Society, and Personal and Family Materials. The collection includes correspondence, financial records, lectures, reports, student papers, and other printed material.

The Subject Files Series, 1926-1973, is mainly concerned with the internal functioning of the university, the history department, cultural life on campus, and faculty organizations. A number of student folders are filed in this section, under "History Dept.: Students." Nelson selected these particular folders to give examples of his grading system, to show some of his students' work, and to cover the span of Nelson's years at Duke. The folders of those students who achieved prominence are also included in this section.

The Chamber Arts Society Series, 1945-1975, contains financial records, membership lists, programs, and correspondence. Nelson founded the Durham Chamber Arts Society in 1945 to offer members of the Durham and Duke communities an opportunity to further their appreciation of the fine arts. The Chamber Arts Society began by presenting chamber music concerts in the East Duke Music Room at Duke University. Nelson was chairman of the Chamber Arts Society until 1963.

Most of the Personal and Family Materials Series, 1913-1966, is made up of correspondence and concerns family matters, health problems, and descriptions of short excursions such as bicycle outings and shopping trips.

Some of the correspondence includes information about current world events. In letters to Nelson, economics professor Calvin Bryce Hoover described life in the Soviet Union in 1929, and the upcoming German elections in 1932. In 1939, Shelby McCloy described the reaction in France to the outbreak of World War II and faculty members' assignments during the war. In 1943, several Duke faculty members described the effects of the war on Duke University. Professor William B. Hamilton wrote about how teaching loads had greatly increased due to the large number of V-12 naval and marine cadets who were sent to Duke. Alan K. Manchester described the Navy syllabus used to teach World History and how the war changed civilian life. Several letters from William T. Laprade discussed the impact of the war on the history department and the effect of the draft on faculty.

Nelson carried on lengthy correspondence with some of his students, many of whom either went abroad or entered graduate schools, and with a number of scholars at other institutions. Among these scholars are Carl Becker, Roland Bainton, Preserved Smith, George Lincoln Burr, Theodore Mommsen, and Hans Baron.

A folder list is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 1 and Box 6 are closed pending processing.

Access to the folders containing student records is RESTRICTED. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

Collection

John S. Bradway papers, 1914-1991 60 Linear Feet — 0.03 Gigabytes

Papers of John S. Bradway, lawyer, legal aid advocate, and educator. Bradway's primary interest and work was in the field of legal aid. He served as Secretary of the National Association of Legal Aid Organizations (NALAO) from 1922-1940, and as its President from 1940-1942. While at Duke University, Bradway founded and directed the Duke Legal Aid Clinic from 1931 until 1959. The bulk of the collection reflects Bradway's role as Secretary for the National Association of Legal Aid Organizations (NALAO). Some materials were gathered by John Lindsey, a colleague and friend of Bradway's, and include writings, teaching materials, and some correspondence. Materials include correspondence with various state and city legal aid bureaus, detailed statistics and annual reports from these organizations, correspondence with various national social service and aid agencies such as the National Conference on Social Work, and NALAO committee reports and conference proceedings. Also included are chapter files of his books, addresses, and articles written by Bradway on topics relating to legal aid.

The bulk of the collection reflects the work of John S. Bradway in his role as Secretary for the National Association of Legal Aid Organizations (NALAO). Materials include correspondence with various state and city legal aid bureaus, detailed statistics and annual reports from these organizations, correspondence with various national social service and aid agencies such as the National Conference on Social Work, and NALAO committee reports and conference proceedings. Also included are chapter files of his books, addresses, and articles written by Bradway on topics relating to legal aid. Duke Legal Aid Clinic (DLAC) materials are also present.

Bound volumes include correspondence, pamphlets, reports, and other materials related to John Bradway's work with NALAO which have been bound together into volumes. These series of volumes were numbered, and are incomplete.

Accession UA2017.0063 was gathered by John M. Lindsey, a friend and colleague of John Bradway, and includes copies of writings and teaching materials created by Bradway, as well as some correspondence and materials related to Bradway's death.

Collection

Harold T. Parker papers, 1914-2002 24.5 Linear Feet — 16,250 Items

Harold T. Parker taught history at Duke University from 1939-1977; he specialized in modern European history, European intellectual history and 19th century Europe. This collection contains material concerning Parker's experiences as a faculty member at Duke University, a soldier in World War II and as an author. The papers include correspondence, including v-mail, along with diaries, volumes, memoranda, reports, speeches, articles, photographs, essays, book drafts and other records.

This collection contains material concerning Parker's experiences as a faculty member at Duke University, a soldier in World War II and as an author. The papers include correspondence, including v-mail, along with diaries, volumes, memoranda, reports, speeches, articles, photographs, essays, book drafts and other records. The volume titles include Back Load and Sky Train, which are histories of troop carrier forces in the South Pacific during World War II.

Collection

William Hays Simpson papers, 1915-1938 0.5 Linear Feet — 100 Items

William Hays Simpson was a Professor of Political Science at Duke University from 1930 until 1974. His collection includes material concerning credits in North Carolina, which was one of Professor Simpson's research interests. Also includes reports, clippings, and correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1915-1938.

Contains material concerning credits in North Carolina, which was one of Professor Simpson's research interests. Also includes reports, clippings, and correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1915-1938.