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John G. Younger papers, 1976-2001 1.5 Linear Feet

John G. Younger graduated from Stanford University in 1967 with a B. A. in History with Honors. At the University of Cincinnati, he earned an M. A. in Classics in 1969 and a Ph.D. in Classics in 1973. From 1973-1974, Dr. Younger taught at the Campion School in Athens Greece. From 1974-2002, he taught at Duke University, first as Assistant Professor of Classical Studies, then as Associate Professor and then Professor of Classical Archaeology. In 2002, Dr. Younger left Duke to teach at the University of Kansas as Professor in Classics and Humanities and Western Civilization. The collection contains records and papers concerning the FOCUS program, archaeology courses, gay activism and campus diversity issues. The materials include minutes and reports of the president's and other committees, correspondence, email, printed matter, financial records, photographs and drawings, archaeological reports and student course and term papers. The material ranges in date from 1976-2001.

The collection contains records and papers concerning the FOCUS program, archaeology courses, gay activism and campus diversity issues. The materials include minutes and reports of the president's and other committees, correspondence, email, printed matter, financial records, photographs and drawings, archaeological reports and student course and term papers. Major subjects include the University's diversity awareness program, benefits for same-sex spousal equivalents, and gay life on campus, the administration of the FOCUS program, and the history and archaeology of East and West campuses and Duke Forest. Some student papers are graded and the files include other student-identifiable records. Also includes scripts of plays written by Duke alum Kevin Patterson and other writers. Patterson was a member of Duke Players and died of AIDS in New York. One of his plays, Allen Turing: The Most Secret War, was produced on Broadway. The collection includes an early draft of this piece. The material ranges in date from 1976-2001.

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Robert H. Woody papers, 1927-1985. 6 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a professor of history at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscripts, short writings, vitae, certificates, diplomas, committee reports, printed material, photographs, 8 mm films, and VHS tapes. Major subjects include Robert H. Woody, the Civil War, the South, South Carolina, North Carolina, reconstruction, republicans, southern newspapers, biographies, mountain culture, folklore, history instruction, Duke University, the Duke University history department, and the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana. Major correspondents appearing in the collection include: William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, William T. Laprade, Francis Warrenton Dawson, Stanly Godbold, Jr., Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, Stanley Godbold, the Southern Historical Association, and the Historical Society of North Carolina. Some materials are restricted. Materials range in date from 1927 to 1985. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a teacher and historian at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Materials include correspondence with individuals and professional organizations, films, clippings, and writings (including original Civil War correspondence) pertaining to Woody's research, and manuscript materials for biographies of Civil War statesmen and Duke University President William Preston Few. Major correspondents include colleagues at Duke University: Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, and William T. Laprade. Correspondence is ordered alphabetically. Films are 8mm format. Some materials are restricted

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Peter Wood papers on the Nixon Library Controversy, 1981, 1985 0.5 Linear Feet — approx. 450 Items

Peter H. Wood is Professor Emeritus in the Dept. of History at Duke University. The collection consists of documentation related to the Nixon Library Controversy at Duke during 1981.

This collection contains correspondence, flyers, clippings, and other documents regarding the Nixon Library Controversy at Duke during 1981. The documentation was created and/or collected by Dept. of History Professor, Peter H. Wood, and demonstrates the divisiveness of this controversy as well as the opinions of Duke faculty members regarding the Nixon library.

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Bunyan S. Womble papers, 1900-1976 3.9 Linear Feet — 1800 Items

Bunyan S. Womble, graduate of Trinity College in 1904 and Trinity Law School in 1906, served actively on the Board of Trustees from 1915-1963, and then as an emeritus trustee until his death in 1976. The collection includes correspondence, reports, several newspaper clippings, memoranda, charts, and other materials. The bulk of these materials date from 1959-1963 and concern the governance and administration of the University.

The materials within the first and second box include correspondence, reports, several newspaper clippings, memoranda, charts, and other materials. The bulk of these materials date from 1959-1963 and concern the governance and administration of the University. Among the subjects found in the papers are the building of the Law School, the Board of Trustees, the place of religion in the curriculum, the Research Triangle Institute, and the integration of the University.

The third box consists entirely of photographs. The photographs include: 8 Trinity College scenes, 31 portraits of classmates (primarily from the Trinity class of 1904), 1 portrait of John Carlisle Kilgo, 1 portrait of a baseball player (in uniform but unidentified), 1 dormitory room (circa 1904), and 30 miscellaneous and unidentified photographs. The unidentified photos appear to be mostly of family and friends, circa 1900-1910.

Minutes of the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee have been removed and placed in the Board's records. A newspaper clipping file on the Edens-Gross controversy has also been removed and placed in Small Collections.

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Frederick A. Wolf papers, 1917 - 1975 0.4 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Frederick A. Wolf (1885-1975) served as Professor of Botany at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1954. His research focused on tobacco agriculture and pathology. The Frederick A. Wolf papers include research notebooks and photographs, a list of his publications, and reprints of Wolf's scholarly articles, all concerning his research in tobacco and leaf diseases and fungi. English.

The Wolf papers include research notebooks and photographs, a list of his publications, and reprints of some of Wolf's publications, all concerning his research in tobacco and leaf diseases and fungi.

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Robert R. Wilson papers, 1921 - 1975 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Robert Renbert Wilson served as a professor of political science at Duke University from 1925 to 1975. He also acted as chair of the Dept. of Political Science (1934-1948), Director of Graduate Studies (1937-1947, 1949-1966), lecturer in the Law School (1948-1966), and chair of the Commonwealth Studies Center (1959-1966) at Duke University, and as an adviser on commercial treaties to the U.S. State Department. The Robert R. Wilson Papers primarily consist of correspondence, but the collection also contains writings, teaching materials, subject files, and photographs. Major subjects include American politics and government, treaties, international law, political theory, and the American Journal of International Law. English.

The Robert R. Wilson papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Writings, Courses, Subject Files, and Photographs. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence dealing with Wilson's speaking engagements, professional associations, books and publications, and students and colleagues in law and political science at Duke and at institutions across the United States. Major correspondents include the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Dept. of State, the American Journal of International Law, the Commonwealth Studies Center, and university presses. Writings include articles, book reviews, addresses, and other pieces written by Wilson about obligatory arbitration, treaties, African American suffrage, international law, public law, international organization, World War II, the British Commonwealth, the United Nations, and U.S. foreign relations. The Courses series includes syllabi, exams, class case studies, and other materials relating to Wilson's classes in American politics and government, and in international law. Subject Files include reports, articles written about Robert R. Wilson, students' evaluations of Wilson's courses, and other materials. Photographs include a group photo of the Intercollegiate Model Disarmament Conference (Bucknell University, Dec. 4-6, 1931); an unidentified, undated group photo; and an unidentified, undated portrait of a female subject.

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Kenny J. Williams papers, 1971-1995 3 Linear Feet — 2, 000 Items

Kenny Williams was a professor of English at Duke University. Her collection includes memorabilia, correspondence, department memoranda and manuscripts.

Contains greeting cards, brochures, correspondence, departmental memoranda, course materials, committee minutes, and manuscripts of Williams' article "The Masking of the Novelist" and her book In the City of Men: Another Story of Chicago. Also includes documents relating to the President's Council on Black Affairs, the Nixon Library controversy, and the Phi Beta Kappa selection committees. Minutes, private correspondence and reports of the English Department and the University should be restricted. Receipts, recommendation letters, grade disputes and ephemeral correspondence were discarded for processing. Correspondence was removed from envelopes and foldered.

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George W. Williams papers, 1950-2005 4.1 Linear Feet — 5,000 Items

George Williams taught in the English Department at Duke University. His collection includes lecture materials, correspondence, department and University correspondence, memoranda, and conference memorabilia.

Contains personal correspondence, Graduate School and English Department memoranda, campus committee minutes and correspondence, conference programs and organizational materials, materials relating to Duke's program in Continuing Education for College Faculty.

Removed rubber bands for preservation, discarded 7 folders of student grades and employment records.

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William Edward Whitford papers, 1955-1966 0.5 Linear Feet — 12 Items

A Duke University Alum, William Edward Whitford eventually became manager of Duke's Physical Plant Operations and Maintenance. His collection includes bound date books from the years 1955-66.

Contains 12 of Whitford's date books from the years 1955 to 1966. Date books include entries for personal, social and cultural events, many of which took place at Duke.

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Newman Ivey White papers, 1915-1948 8 Linear Feet

Newman Ivey White was an educator and Percy Bysshe Shelley scholar. He served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1948. The papers include correspondence, lectures, research materials, including notecards, copies of letters, manuscripts, and photographs along with printed matter, miscellaneous writings, and other papers, with bulk dates of 1936-1948. Most of the material reflects his work on Shelley and the English Romantic poets; a small amount of reprints and lectures concerns folklore. Much of the correspondence is between White and other scholars of the English poets; correspondents include T. J. Wise, Frederick L. Jones, and George L. Kittredge. H.L. Mencken and George Bernard Shaw wrote to congratulate White on his publications. Several folders of correspondence with members of the publishing firm of Alfred A. Knopf regard the publication of Shelley in 1940. A letter from Duke faculty member Calvin B. Hoover describes Nazi Germany in 1932, and several of White's European correspondents comment on conditions in Europe during World War II. English.

Correspondence, lectures, research materials, including photostatic copies of letters, manuscripts, and graphics, along with printed matter, miscellaneous writings, and other papers, with bulk dates of 1936-1948. There is little in the collection that relates to Prof. White's early career. Most of the material appears to have been collected in the course of his work on the English Romantic poets; a small amount of material, comprising reprints and lectures, concerns folklore. Much of the correspondence is between White and other students of the English poets; subjects of the letters include differing opinions and disputes over the interpretation of events in Shelley's life. Other correspondents, among them H.L. Mencken and George Bernard Shaw, congratulate White on his publications. Several folders of correspondence with members of the publishing firm of Alfred A. Knopf concern the publication of Shelley in 1940. A letter from Duke faculty member Calvin B. Hoover describes Nazi Germany in 1932, and several of White's European correspondents make comments about conditions in Europe during World War II.

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Joseph C. Wetherby papers, 1930 - 1976 4.6 Linear Feet — 5500 Items

Joseph Cable Wetherby served as Associate Professor of English at Duke University from 1947-1976. The papers consist of correspondence, printed matter, speeches, clippings, minutes, memoranda, teaching aids and other teaching materials, student papers, photographs, research notes, and writings. Major subjects include the teaching of English to international students at Duke, broadcasting and the development of the WDBS radio station at Duke University, and the Duke University Debate Team, which Wetherby coached for over 20 years. English.

The Wetherby Papers contain printed material (including pamphlets, brochures, flyers, programs, speeches, and clippings), correspondence, minutes, memoranda, teaching aids and other teaching materials, student papers, photographs, research notes, writings, and other papers. Inclusive dates for the collection are ca. 1930 to 1976, with the bulk of material from 1947 to 1976.

These papers chiefly reflect Wetherby's interest in three major areas: teaching English as a foreign language, broadcasting, and debating. In the first category falls material on grammar and enunciation (including numerous exercises, tests, and other teaching aids), speech and hearing pathology, and a small number of administrative papers dealing with the teaching of English to international students at Duke University. In the area of broadcasting, there are clippings, course descriptions, lecture material, and printed material on the history of radio and television; its methods, principles, and policies; legal status; government policies affecting broadcasting; and audience and market research. Wetherby also kept clippings, printed matter, and copies of speeches on communications and broadcasting in general, as well as on specialized topics such as TV violence and cigarette advertising.

Files concerning the history of Duke University include materials on a proposed FM station for the campus (1957-1968), as well as selected student papers on such topics as broadcasting at Duke, the Vigil of 1968, and the Associated Students of Duke University in a conflict with WDBS. There are also a number of selected student papers on various aspects of communications, broadcasting, and the persuasive speaking.

There is a card file on members of the Debate Team with their records by opponent and tournament, and a small amount of material (correspondence, records, circulars, a telegram) on the West Point National Tournament for 1962 to 1964.

Useful information regarding a significant incident early in Wetherby's tenure as debate coach will be found in William King, "Not fit to debate? National debate topic on Communist China gets hackles up," in the Duke Alumni Register, vol. 65, no. 2, Nov.- Dec. 1978. The article deals with Wetherby's defense of the right of collegiate debaters to argue this sensitive topic in 1954, at the height of the McCarthy era. Wetherby appeared on the "See It Now" program of Edward R. Murrow on CBS Television.

Wetherby coached three teams from Duke University which appeared on national television on the "College Bowl" series, in 1955, 1960, and 1968. Some materials in the collection deal with the logistics of these teams' travel and appearances, and on the operation of the telecasts.

Gathered in separate folders as well as scattered throughout the collection is a large amount of printed material in the form of brochures, handbooks, pamphlets, newsletters, and copies of speeches. Included is material from organizations like the National Association of Broadcasters, the Federal Communications Commission, the Southern Speech Association (later the Southern Speech Communication Association), and the Speech Communication Association. The collection from the Southern Speech Association and its successor organization includes a consecutive run of programs for annual conventions from 1951 to 1976. The material on the Speech Communication Association includes consecutive issues from 1968 to 1976 of Free Speech, a newsletter of this organization's Commission on Freedom of Speech.

During the 1960s, Wetherby frequently was sent to regional high schools to promote Duke University to prospective students.

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Henry Weitz papers, 1931 - 1978 16.5 Linear Feet — 16000 Items

Henry Weitz, a psychologist and professor of education, was director of Duke University's Bureau of Testing and Guidance (later the University Counseling Center) from 1950 to 1978. The Henry Weitz Papers include correspondence, reports, minutes, writings, speeches, publications, research and testing materials, course materials, and other documents related to Weitz's career at the University of Delaware and Duke University. Most of the materials are related to Weitz's interest in guidance, vocational, and adjustment counseling for students. English.

The Henry Weitz Papers include correspondence, reports, minutes, writings, speeches, publications, research and testing materials, course materials, and other documents related to Weitz's career at the University of Delaware and Duke University. Most of the materials are related to Weitz's interest in guidance, vocational, and adjustment counseling for students.

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Morris Weisfeld papers, undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 3 Items

Morris Weisfeld was a professor in the Mathematics Department at Duke University. His collection contains three booklets of teaching materials.

Contains three bound booklets of outlines and lessons for courses on Modern Algebra, Elementary Topology and Wave Equations.

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Richard L. Watson, Jr. papers, 1941 - 1989 19 Linear Feet — 14,500 Items

Richard L. Watson, Jr. served as Professor of History at Duke University (1939-1984), Chair of the Department of History (1960-1967), Chair of the Academic Council (1964-1966, 1975-1977), and associate editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly (1974-1987). Papers include correspondence, notes, committee minutes and reports, course evaluations, research files, and manuscript drafts of chapters, and involve Watson's work with the Army Air Force Historical Office, the History Department, Duke University, professional organizations, research and writings in American history and historiography, and personal materials. English.

The materials in this collection consist of the papers of Richard L. Watson, Jr. accrued between 1941 and 1989. The majority of the collection pertains to his work at Duke University, both in the department of history and in service to university faculty and administration. There are also papers relating to his writings and research, his work in the Army Air Force Historical Office, professional organizations, and personal life. Types of materials include correspondence, notes, committee minutes and reports, teacher course evaluations, chapter files and draft chapters.

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Calvin L. Ward papers, 1963-1974 0.2 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Calvin Ward was a Zoology professor at Duke University. The collection contains correspondence and memoranda relating to faculty groups, the Biology, Forestry and Genetics programs and University-wide issues.

Contains correspondence and memoranda concerning the development of the Duke genetics program, the faculty advisory system, the Biology-Forestry Library, an Experiential Cross-Sectional Community, University Center planning, the music building, U.F.C.A.S., the Osborn Faculty Discussion Group, and the Fund for Experimental Education at Duke.

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Clement Vollmer papers, 1898-1983 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Clement Vollmer joined the German Languages and Literature Department at Duke University in 1926, where he remained until his retirement in 1956. In 1918, he published The American Novel in Germany. Professor Vollmer served as chair of the department during the 1950s, as president of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, and was a member of numerous academic societies. Includes correspondence, recommendations, faculty meeting minutes, German Department memoranda, grade books and department enrollment statistics. Also includes date books, address books and diaries kept by Maude Hugo Vollmer (Mrs. Clement Vollmer). Inclusive years are 1898-1983.

Contains materials related to Vollmer's career in the German Department at Duke, including correspondence, recommendations, minutes, memoranda, grade books, department enrollment, faculty appointments and wartime activities. Also includes correspondence relating to University Church services, the Academic Council and the Vigil. The rest of the collection includes address/date books and diaries (including travel diaries) kept primarily by Maude Hugo Vollmer, wife of Clement Vollmer. Also includes a list of houses (with architect names) in the Duke Forest, a New Testament, a University of Southern California handbook, a wallet full of expired oil company credit cards. Original brittle folders were replaced for preservation. Inclusive dates are 1898-1983.

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Aleksandar Sedmak Vesić papers, 1956-1982 5 Linear Feet

Aleksandar Sedmak Vesić was a prominent civil engineer and Duke engineering professor. He is especially known for his work on soil properties and interaction with construction materials, as well as the use of explosives in excavation projects.

The collection covers Aleksandar Sedmak Vesić's working and class papers. Included is research into soil mechanics, the application of engineering principles to construction materials, and the use of explosives in excavation projects. Vesić also lectured widely and participated in a large number of conferences and committees; materials related to those activities are also represented.

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Richard Lovejoy Tuthill papers, 1946-1968 0.5 Linear Feet — 350 Items

Richard Lovejoy Tuthill was Professor of Economic Geography and University Registrar at Duke University. This collection contains correspondence, reference material, and notes on the local, state, and national organizations.

This collection contains correspondence, reference material, and notes on the local, state, and national organizations Richard L. Tuthill belonged to and/or interacted with, along with material concerning his non-Registrar-related activities at Duke University. These papers were separated from the records of the Office of the Registrar. For further information on Tuthill and his duties as Registrar, please see that collection. The bulk of this material centers on geography and education. Included are folders from the Association of American Geographers and the 1955 Conference on Teaching the Social Studies. Tuthill appears to have shown particular interest in the value of television as an educational tool. The collection ranges in date from 1946-1968.

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William Clair Turner papers, circa 1960s-2013 18.5 Linear Feet

William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner’s academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner’s involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner’s academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

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Arlin Turner papers, 1953-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 600 Items

Arlin Turner was a professor in Duke's English Department from 1953 to 1978 and served as department chair during 1958-1964. The collection includes department memoranda, correspondence, minutes and documentation relating to English Department policies. Also included are minutes, memoranda and correspondence related to various committees Turner served on. The collection ranges in date from 1953-1979.

Collection includes council and committee records including memos, correspondence, minutes of the University Council, the Humanities Council, the Undergraduate Faculty Council and the Graduate Affairs Committee of the University Planning Committee. There are also records of the English department, including minutes, correspondence, and memoranda. Files relating to student grades and personnel decisions were destroyed. The collection ranges in date from 1953-1979.

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Alfred P. Tischendorf papers, 1953-1961 0.2 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Alfred Paul Tischendorf came to Duke in 1955 and served as Assistant Professor in the Department of History. His publications include "The Anglo-Mexican Claims Commission, 1884-1895," "The Loss of British Commercial Pre-eminence in Mexico, 1876-1911," and "British Experience in Georgia, 1865-1907." He died in Argentina while on sabbatical in 1962. Contains correspondence, research-related material, and miscellaneous material. There are a few pamphlets in the miscellaneous folder. The collection also contains a restricted folder which contains privacy-protected information. The material ranges in date from 1953-1961.

Contains correspondence, research-related material, and miscellaneous material. There are a few pamphlets in the miscellaneous folder. The collection also contains a restricted folder which contains privacy-protected information. The material ranges in date from 1953-1961.

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Edward A. Tiryakian papers, 1963-2008 2.75 Linear Feet

Dr. Edward Tiryakian taught in the Department of Sociology from 1965 until his retirement in 2004. He served as Chair of the Department in addition to positions as Visiting Professor abroad. He was appointed Director for the Center of International Studies in 1988 and served until 1991. The collection contains correspondence and materials related to the Dept. of Sociology, and the Center for International Studies as well as memoranda, clippings and correspondence regarding general University business but also the Nixon Presidential Library controversy and the Allen Building Takeover. The collection ranges in date from 1963-2008.

Contains correspondence and materials related to the Dept. of Sociology and the Center for International Studies as well as memoranda, clippings and correspondence regarding general University business and committees but also the Nixon Presidential Library controversy and the Allen Building Takeover. Some of the files are restricted. The collection ranges in date from 1963-2008.

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Edgar Tristram Thompson papers, 1915 - 1985 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Edgar Tristram Thompson taught Sociology at Duke University from 1937 until his retirement in 1970. The papers include correspondence with Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen; teaching materials from undergraduate and graduate courses in race relations, religion, and social anthropology; lecture notes from Thompson's mentor and sociology instructor Robert E. Park; research on plantations in Hawaii and in Africa as the Hugh le May Fellow at Rhodes University; development and operations of a Black Studies program and Center for Southern Studies at Duke University; short papers discussing race relations at Duke University and racial identity; autobiographical histories of Thompson's students; manuscripts for many books on race relations; records of participation in Alpha Kappa Delta and American Sociological Association conferences; a campus-wide graffiti survey; and addresses to the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham. English.

The material in this collection addresses American race relations and scholarly treatment of race from about 1940 to 1970. The bulk of the records date from 1920 to 1970. Included are manuscripts of papers by Thompson, his thesis, a bound volume of selected writings, personal and professional correspondence, printed matter, research notes, proofs, departmental budgets and other materials relating to the study and teaching of sociology. Primary sources include handwritten autobiographical histories written by African American students and surveys from a nationwide graffiti project. Major subjects in the manuscripts include race relations in the United States and in other countries, the South, religion in the South, international plantation systems, and sociological anthropology. There is also a small amount of material on the sociology of language. Also included are histories of the Department of Sociology, articles presented in symposia and conferences by Thompson, correspondence concerning the development, establishment, and operations of the Duke Center for Southern Studies (1965 to 1969) and the formation of a Black Studies program (1969). There are also papers from the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham from 1945. Other materials include newspaper articles which address problems and violence in race relations and publicity of race relations events at Duke.

In addition to scholarly topics in sociology, this collection introduces perspectives on race relations at Duke University during the politically active 1960s and 1970s. There are a number of articles about Duke-sponsored race relations learning activities. Thompson was a strong advocate of learning about personal racial heritage and understanding social structures and events though that frame. He tried for many years, without success, to gain the Ford Foundation's sponsorship of race relations conferences and seminars; this topic received much attention from scholars in sociology. Correspondents include contemporary sociologists Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen. Thompson's greatest influence was Robert E. Park, a former instructor who was also an expert on race relations theory and plantation systems.

The Edgar T. Thompson papers were originally unorganized. Folders contained many types of documents covering a variety of topics and were loosely grouped by date according to year of accession of the material. The folders have since been further grouped into several series, and further by date within each series, where applicable. Many items in this collection are undated. A list of Thompson's writing can be found at the front of the bound volume The Papers of Dr. Edgar T. Thompson.

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Stephen Tell Collection of Performing Arts Events at Duke, 1987-2001 4.5 Linear Feet — 85 Items

Collection contains video recordings of performing arts events at Duke from 1987-2001. The performances are largely Hoof'n'Horn but also include performances from the Dept. of Theater Studies, namely Duke Players.

Stephen Tell is a Duke alum hired by groups to create recordings of performing arts events. His collection includes video recordings of such events at Duke from 1987-2001, mostly of Hoof'n'Horn productions but it also includes performances by the Dept. of Theater Studies. Formats include VHS, SVHS, Umatic, and DVD.

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W. A. Stumpf papers, circa 1947-1955 3 Linear Feet — approx. 2,000 Items

W. A. Stumpf was Professor of Education at Duke University from 1948 until his retirement in 1968. The collection contains surveys of high school seniors (circa 1955) from Durham, Guilford and Wake County high schools, in addition to a manuscript draft and mimeographed copies of papers relating to a 1950 civil rights case against Washington County (N.C.) schools. The material ranges in date from circa 1947-1955.

The collection includes 3-page survey forms completed by approximately 500 seniors in Durham, Guilford and Wake County high schools, circa 1955. The survey was titled "Plans of High School Seniors," and included questions about their families' economic status and educational background, living conditions, current activities and post-graduation plans. The forms are arranged by county, then school and sex, then numerically by an apparent score or value penciled on the form. Additionally, the collection contains a typed draft manuscript of a work, mimeographed copies of a proposal to offer the Ed.D. at Duke and mimeographed copies of papers relating to Wilmer Wilborne, et al vs. H. P. Taylor, et al, a civil rights suit against Washington County (N.C.) schools which include a copy of "A Report on a Comparison and the Program and Facilities of Instruction in the Negro and White Schools of Durham," by John W. Carr, Jr. (Professor of Education at Duke) and other material on Durham schools, along with a report on Arlington County (V.A.) high schools. The material ranges in date from circa 1947-1955.

Not all of the surveys have a penciled value or score on them. Since the purpose of the value or score is unknown, surveys with values or scores may fall under FERPA rules as protected information. As such, access to those surveys may be prohibited.

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John A. Stewman papers, circa 1926-1932 1.2 Linear Feet — 139 Items

John A. Stewman served as an engineer with the Duke Construction Company from 1928-1932. The collection includes photographs, drawings, and specs. The material ranges in date from about 1926-1932.

Collection contains materials from John Stewman's time as an engineer for the Duke Construction Company during the building of West Campus. The collection largely includes photographs and negatives of the construction of Duke Chapel from December 10, 1930 to May 2, 1932, taken and identified by John Stewman. Also included are engineering drawings and specifications for buildings on West Campus. The material ranges in date from about 1926-1932.

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Philip Stewart Papers on the Nixon Library, 1979-1990 0.5 Linear Feet

Philip Stewart is a professor emeritus of Romance Studies at Duke University. Stewart served on the Subcommittee on Library Relations, which was convened by Duke’s Academic Council in September 1981 as part of a faculty initiative to study the potential impact of locating the Richard Nixon Presidential Library on the university campus. Materials in this collection primarily relate to the research of the Library Subcommittee, and include correspondence from Duke President Terry Sanford, who initiated the Nixon Library proposal in August 1981; correspondence from Duke faculty and trustees; press clippings; Academic Council meeting minutes; and the Library Subcommittee’s report to the Academic Council. The collection also contains research and reports from the Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Governance, another group formed in the wake of the Nixon Library proposal.

Materials in this collection primarily relate to the research of the Duke University Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Library Relations, which was formed in September 1981 as part of a faculty initiative to study the potential impact of locating the Richard Nixon Presidential Library on the university campus. Materials also include research of the Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Governance, formed at the same time, which was to examine the authority of the university president and the faculty’s role in making decisions at the university.

The materials include correspondence from Duke President Terry Sanford, faculty, and trustees; press clippings; minutes of Academic Council meetings between August-November 1981; research, drafts, and the final report from the Library Subcommittee; and research and reports related to the Governance Subcommittee. The collection also contains documents regarding the Faculty Compensation Committee and some press coverage of the opening of the Richard Nixon Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California, in 1990.

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Lionel Stevenson papers, 1808-1989, bulk 1911-1974 25.25 Linear Feet — 30,300 items

Lionel Stevenson was James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University from 1955-1971. This collection contains artwork, canadiana, clippings, correspondence, course material, diaries, financial records, manuscripts, photographs, and scrapbooks regarding the life and work of Lionel Stevenson. The material ranges in date from 1808-1989, bulk from 1911-1974.

The papers of Lionel Stevenson span the years 1808 to 1989, although the bulk of the material dates from the 1920s to 1973. They consist of canadiana; clippings; correspondence; course material; general files; manuscripts and notes; notes, papers, and research; non-textual material; organizations; oversized materials; and writings. The collection documents Lionel Stevenson's work as both an author and a professor, as well as an avid collector of news clippings and expert on the Cary family. Subject areas include genealogy of the Cary family, Canadian authors and poets, and photographs, and nineteenth century English literary criticism.

The General Files series is mainly comprised of personal files, like financial records and general miscellany. The Non-Textual Material series contains over 230 cartes de visite photographs, chiefly of the Cary family, as well as other various photographs and pictures. The bulk of the Writings series contains mainly articles and drafts. Notable in this series is Stevenson's Masters thesis. The series Course Material contains folders of syllabi, lecture notes, and miscellaneous papers relating to courses he taught. The Notes, Papers, and Research series contains research notes relating to the writings of Lionel Stevenson. Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent. Notable in this series are letters from literary figures Joyce Cary, Bliss Carman, and Evelyn Waugh. The Organizations contains papers regarding the various groups Stevenson belonged to, notably the Canadian Authors Association, Dickens Fellowship, Modern Language Association, and the PEN Congress. The Manuscript and Notes series contains miscellaneous papers and a manuscript of Revolt Among the Artists. The bulk of the Clippings series are clippings removed from Correspondence and arranged alphabetically. The Diaries series is two boxes filled with Stevenon's personal diaries kept from 1919 to 1974. The Oversized Material series contains clippings and papers removed from their respective series, as well as three scrapbooks of clippings, a novel, audio cassette, and a poster for an essay contest. Canadiana contains miscellaneous Canadian memorabilia that Stevenson collected. The last series Oversized Artwork contains paintings and pictures that were formerly housed in the general oversized collection.

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William Stern papers, 1937-1938, undated 4 Linear Feet — 10 Items

William Stern was a psychologist and philosopher. He came to Duke as Visiting Professor in 1934. He remained until his death in 1938. The collection includes volumes compiled by Stern and his wife Clara Stern (1878-1945) in his psychological studies, correspondence with Eugen Berchtold, as well as a two-volume dissertation by a German student on Stern's philosophy. The material is in German.

The collection includes volumes compiled by Stern and his wife Clara Stern (1878-1945) in his psychological studies, correspondence with Eugen Berchtold, as well as a two-volume dissertation by a German student on Stern's philosophy. The material is in German.

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Hertha Sponer papers, 1917-1967 6 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Hertha Sponer, 1895-1968, was a German physicist who immigrated to the United States and came to Duke University in 1936, where she became the first woman on its Physics Department faculty. She conducted research and taught at Duke until 1965, supervising thirty-five masters and doctoral degree graduates. The Hertha Sponer Papers span the years 1917-1967 and comprise the correspondence, research, speeches, writings, and teaching materials of German physicist Hertha Sponer, who in 1936 became the first woman appointed to the faculty of the Duke University Department of Physics. The collection primarily documents her American career, especially her work in the areas of chemical physics, spectrum analysis, and molecular spectroscopy. Arranged in five series: Correspondence, Printed Materials, Professional Files, Research Files, and Writings and Speeches. The Correspondence Series covers the final two decades of her career, from the late 1940s to 1967, and primarily consists of letters about research with her numerous collaborators and co-authors. Some of her final letters discuss death of her husband, physicist James Franck, in 1964, and also allude to the death that same year of her Duke Physics Department associate and fellow German refugee, Hedwig Kohn. The Printed Materials Series holds offprints and reprints of Sponer's articles from the 1930s-1960s, plus a few articles by Franck. Sponer's teaching and administrative files, including correspondence with graduate students, appear in the Professional Files. The Research Files make up the largest series in the collection; these files document her research on many topics and articles and also contain much of the collection's correspondence. The Writings and Speeches Series gathers several papers and talks from the last half-dozen years of Sponer's professional career.

The Hertha Sponer Papers, 1917-1967, comprise the correspondence, research, speeches, writings, and teaching materials of Hertha Sponer, a German physicist who in 1936 became the first woman appointed to the faculty of the Duke University Department of Physics. The collection primarily documents her American career, especially her research and publications in the areas of chemical physics, spectrum analysis, and molecular spectroscopy. It is arranged in five series: Correspondence, Printed Materials, Professional Files, Research Files, and Writings and Speeches. The Correspondence Series covers the final two decades of Sponer's career, from the late 1940s to 1967. Her primary correspondents were various collaborators and co-authors, with whom she generally discussed research and professional concerns rather than personal matters. Several late letters, though, discuss the 1964 death of her husband, physicist James Franck, and briefly allude to the death that same year of her Duke Physics Department associate and fellow German refugee, Hedwig Kohn. The small Printed Materials Series is composed of offprints and reprints of Sponer's articles, spanning her entire professional career in America, but also contains a few 1960s articles by Franck. Sponer's teaching and administrative files, including correspondence with Duke graduate students about their theses, are arranged in the Professional Files; this series also includes information about research grants, conferences, and other professional activities. The Research Files make up the largest series in the collection. These files document Sponer's research on many topics and articles and also contain much of the collection's correspondence. The Research Files also document the only paper she co-wrote with Hedwig Kohn. The collection concludes with a small Writings and Speeches series, which gathers several papers and talks from the last half-dozen years of Sponer's professional career.

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Hersey Everett Spence papers, 1794; 1904-1973 2.88 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Hersey Everett Spence was a minister, educator, and writer. After graduating from Trinity College in 1908 he spent ten years in the pastorate before returning to his alma mater in 1918 as Professor of Religious Education and Biblical Literature. The collection contains correspondence, writings (poems, plays, eulogies by Smith), clippings, a sound recording, and other printed material reflecting the opinions and career of H.E. Spence. The materials in the collection range in date from 1794; 1904-1973; with the bulk of the materials dating from 1938 to 1970.

The Hersey Everett Spence papers contain correspondence, writings (poems, plays, eulogies by Smith), clippings, a sound recording, and other printed material reflecting the opinions and career of H.E. Spence. Spence was noted for his outspokenness on the state of the University and on matters such as desegregation (he was not in favor) and athletics (he was in favor). Other subjects present include: biography and family genealogy; the Methodist Retirement Home; and the Duke Memorial Methodist Church (both in Durham, NC). The collection includes over 100 unpublished poems; a copy of Spence's "When Preacher's Meet", a volume concerning the NC Pastor's School; the typescript of "I Remember" (1954) [400 pages, titled "Fifty Years of Alma Mater"]; and a taped interview (12 June 1970; no transcript). The materials in the collection range in date from 1794; 1904-1973; with the bulk of the materials dating from 1938 to 1970.

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Robert S. Smith papers, 1930 - 1969 11 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Robert Sidney Smith (1904-1969) taught economics at Duke University for over 35 years. His research focused on Latin American and South American economic thought. The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, notes, microfilms, and other published materials. Major topics include Latin American and South American economic thought and policy, the Dan River Textile Mills in Danville, Virginia, and the Department of Economics and Business Administration at Duke University. English, and Spanish or Castilian.

Collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, notes, microfilms, and other published materials related to Smith's professional career as an educator and economist. Much of the material is in Spanish, reflecting his activities and research interests in Latin American economic history and development, and the history of Hispanic economic thought. Other matters treated in the files concern the Dan River Textile Mills in Danville, Virginia, Smith's work as a government consultant, and as a teacher of economics in South America and Latin America., and affairs of the Department of Economics and Business Administration. There is some material related to the courses he taught, and to personal affairs and writings.

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J. Benjamin Smith papers, 1965-1988 1.3 Linear Feet — 75 Items

J. Benjamin Smith was Duke Choral Director from 1968-1988. The collection includes clippings, black and white group photographs, correspondence, sheet music notebooks, "Fontainebleau Alumni Bulletin," and Smith's conductor's baton. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1988.

Collection includes clippings, black and white group photographs, correspondence, sheet music notebooks, "Fontainebleau Alumni Bulletin," and Smith's conductor's baton. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1988.

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Hilrie Shelton Smith papers, 1941-1983 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Hilrie Shelton Smith began his long association with Duke University in 1931 as Professor of Religious Education. He remained at Duke until his retirement in 1963. He H. Shelton Smith was an expert on American religious thought and was considered the dean of American ecclesiastical thought and history. His collection contains material pertaining to his life including materials such as Smith's correspondence with colleagues; the correspondence and printed reviews concerning his individual books; and his sermons, addresses, and lectures. Materials in the collection date from 1941-1983.

Collection contains material pertaining to the life and career of H. Shelton Smith. Subjects addressed in the collection include the name change of the School of Religion to the Divinity School in 1941, the origins of the Kearns fellowships and professorships, and the N.C. Council of Churches. However, the bulk of the material consists of Smith's correspondence with colleagues; the correspondence and printed reviews concerning his individual books; and his sermons, addresses, and lectures.

Among his correspondents are Jimmy Carter, Theodore Hesburgh, Perry Miller, Reinhold Niebuhr, Roland Bainton, Paul Ramsey, John Hope Franklin, and Paul Green. The folders entitled "Publications: Correspondence and Reviews" contain substantive discussions and descriptions of theological trends contemporary with the times in which the books were published. The folder "Correspondence 1966-1982" contains letters from friends and colleagues that often mention theological and political issues in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s.

The sermons and addresses deal not only with race but also with general politics, and include a condemnation of U.S. involvement with Indochina. The lectures and unpublished writings are largely or elucidations of many of the themes he has touched on in published works, including the Southern mind, race and the Southern church, the concepts of original sin and Christology, and the general history of American theology. Five folders contain course lecture notes in typed form on similar topics, but also include notes for a course in the American Social Gospel.

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William Hays Simpson papers, 1915-1938 0.5 Linear Feet — 100 Items

William Hays Simpson was a Professor of Political Science at Duke University from 1930 until 1974. His collection includes material concerning credits in North Carolina, which was one of Professor Simpson's research interests. Also includes reports, clippings, and correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1915-1938.

Contains material concerning credits in North Carolina, which was one of Professor Simpson's research interests. Also includes reports, clippings, and correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1915-1938.

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Edward Christian Simmons papers, 1933-1964 0.5 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Edward Christian Simmons was an economics professor at Duke University. His collection includes correspondence with author Charles Holt Carroll, Carroll's manuscript for Organization of Debt into Currency and correspondence from John Maynard Keynes.

Contains correspondence relating to Charles Holt Carroll (1800-1890) whose Organization of Debt into Currency and Other Papers Simmons edited and for which Simmons wrote an introduction. Includes correspondence with William Volker Fund of Burlingame, CA regarding the publication costs of Carroll's manuscript. Also includes the manuscript of Simmons's edition of Carroll's writings; the title page, table of contents, index and introduction are in typescript, and the rest consists of Photostats of printed copies. Collection also includes a letter from John Maynard Keynes to Simmons, thanking him for his article "Mr. Keynes' Control Scheme." The original of this letter was transferred to the signatures collection. Items were foldered for processing.

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Lambert Armour Shears papers, 1912-1959 0.5 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Lambert Shears was a professor in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literature at Duke University from 1927-1959. The collection includes syllabi, exams, lecture notes, as well as Shears' graduate student papers from Columbia University and ranges in date from 1912-1959.

Shears' collection includes lecture and research notes from his years as a graduate student and professor, final exams given at Duke, and papers written while a graduate student at Columbia. The collection ranges in date from 1912-1959.

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Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans papers, 1947-1989 2.0 Linear Feet

Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans attended Duke University and graduated in the class of 1939. She later became a philanthropist and Duke trustee. This collection contains printed matter, photographs, clippings, speeches and other memorabilia relating to Semans' time as trustee, her affiliation with the British American Festival of 1984, and other Duke related activities and events.

This collection contains printed matter, photographs, clippings, speeches and other memorabilia relating to Semans' time as a Duke University trustee, her affiliation with the British American Festival of 1984, and other Duke-related activities and events.

Duke files include reports, programs, addresses and printed ephemera pertaining to matters and events at Duke University. These materials reflect Semans' activities as a university trustee as well as her support for the arts at Duke. These papers also include the transcript of a discussion on race relations at Duke and the takeover of the Allen Building from 1969, as well as minutes from the University Center Committee, the report of the Special Committee on the Functions and Organization of the Board of Trustees, and a summary report of the B.N. Duke Leadership Program.

These materials also include reports on fund raising at Duke and several reports that address salary levels and other issues faced by Duke faculty women and Semans' speech (with slides) given at the 100th Celebration of Duke Memorial United Methodist Church in 1986.

The British American Festival scrapbook contains clippings, correspondence and color snapshots relating to the 1984 North Carolina British-American Festival. There is also a a cassette tape of a recorded interview with Ian Hamilton, who composed "Raleigh's Dream" for the festival.

Oversize folders contain a newsletter from the Duke Class of 1939, Robert Ward's musical score for Music for a Great Occasion for Terry Sanford's inauguration, as well as chapel architectural drawings.

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Anne Firor Scott papers, 1963-2002 6 Linear Feet — 6000 Items

Anne Firor Scott taught in the History Dept. at Duke University from 1961-1991. She is currently W. K. Boyd Professor of History Emerita. The collection includes correspondence, subject files, and student papers and a videorecording. Most of the collection is restricted. It ranges in date from 1963-2002.

Collection contains correspondence, student papers, and committee records. Some materials relate to University matters, but most concern the study and teaching of American history, particularly the history of women in the South. Included are 24 students' reactions to the assassination of John F. Kennedy (1963), 17 student papers on the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (1979), a "Last Lecture" by Dr. Scott ("A Modest Proposal for a Quiet Revolution," 1966), 170 students' interviews with working women (1976), and a letter by Ruth Dozier describing the work of a home demonstration agent in North Carolina from 1900-1920. All of these materials are open for research. University-related material includes the University Scholar Teacher Award (1982-1983) [restricted] and included a files on the Provost Search Committee (1982-1983) which was removed by Archives staff. Correspondence is sometimes labeled Business Correspondence and sometimes as AFS Chronological File. The topical or subject files include letters of recommendation, History Department minutes, and files relating to seminars, meetings, publishing, and professional associations. The correspondence and subject files are closed except by permission of Dr. Scott and the University Archivist. The material ranges in date from 1963-2002.

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Lloyd B. Saville papers, 1936-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Lloyd B. Saville was an educator, researcher, scholar and economist, specializing in economic history and theory. His career at Duke University spanned the years 1946-1979 and encompassed teaching, administration, research, and publication. Collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, grant applications, exam questions, printed matter, newspaper clippings, reports and other materials concerning international economic studies, seminars and societies, and Saville's teaching and research interests. Materials range in date from 1936-1979, bulk 1950-1979.

Collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, scholarly papers, grant applications, exam questions, printed matter, newspaper clippings, reports and other materials concerning international economic studies, seminars and societies, and Saville's teaching/ research interests. Correspondents include Calvin B. Hoover and economists in Italy. Materials range in date from 1936-1979, bulk 1950-1979.

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Eugenia Saville papers, circa 1950-1977 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Eugenia Seville joined the faculty of the Duke University Music Department in 1947 as an instructor, and was eventually promoted to Assistant and Associate Professor in 1950 and 1960, respectively. She specialized in Italian sacred music, and directed the Duke Madrigal Singers from 1947 to 1972. She died in 2006. Contains course materials, music facsimiles, performance scores, materials related to the Duke Madrigal Singers, personal correspondence, and ephemera accumulated during Saville's research trips in the U.S. and Europe.

Contains materials from Saville's various courses taught at Duke. Also includes facsimiles of musical manuscripts, and vocal parts for music used as class examples and as part of the Madrigal Singers' performance repertoire. Collection also contains a wooden box of lantern slides and negatives, primarily of scenes from historical opera performances and opera houses. Removed rubber-bands, 1 folder of receipts and photocopy requests, 1 folder of student employment records, 1 folder of salary information and peripheral "to do" lists.

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Herman Salinger papers, 1909-1982 13.2 Linear Feet — 8,000 Items

Herman Salinger was a professor of German and Comparative Literature at Duke from 1955-1974. Collection includes correspondence, course and curriculum materials, poetry and manuscripts, speeches, photographs, and other materials. Also includes documents dealing with Duke activities and people, course and teaching materials, writings, and records of the Arthur Schnitzler Research Association.

Collection includes correspondence, course and curriculum materials, poetry and manuscripts, speeches, photographs, and other materials. The correspondence includes personal letters, correspondence with former students and professional correspondence. Also includes documents dealing with Duke activities and people, course and teaching materials, writings, and records of the Arthur Schnitzler Research Association.

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Mattie Underwood Russell papers, 1949 - 1988 5 Linear Feet

Mattie Underwood Russell (1915-1988) was Curator of the Duke University Manuscripts Department from 1952 to 1985. During these years, Russell became a nationally-recognized archivist, and increased the number of collections, implemented a cataloging system, and encouraged researchers to use the materials in the Manuscripts Department. The Mattie Underwood Russell Papers include correspondence, reports, writings, subject files, memoranda, and other materials related to Russell's career at Duke University. Major subjects include archival administration, archival education, American history, southern history, the Duke University administration, and the Nixon presidential library controversy at Duke University. English.

The Mattie Underwood Russell Papers include correspondence, reports, writings, subject files, memoranda, and other materials related to Russell's career at Duke University. The collection is divided into five series. The first series, Correspondence, includes both personal and professional materials. In arranging the correspondence, Russell included genealogy, printed material, and other material she felt were pertinent to the correspondence. The series is arranged chronologically. The second series, Subjects, is arranged alphabetically, and includes information about Russell's professional interests as well as biographical and other personal information. Course Materials, the next series, includes information collected during Russell's teaching career in the School of Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The materials are arranged alphabetically by subject. The fourth series, Writings, includes addresses, articles, and other pieces written by Russell. The series is divided into "Addresses and Lectures" and "Writings," and materials are arranged alphabetically into these categories. The last series is the Nixon Presidential Library series, which includes a proposal, correspondence, reports, and committee materials.

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Elbert Russell papers, 1893 - 1968 1.3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Elbert Russell served as a Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 until 1941. Personal and professional papers contain correspondence, manuscript materials, sermons, articles and short writings, and clippings. Major subjects include Duke University Divinity School, study and teaching of the Bible, history of Quakerism, study and teaching of Quakerism, fellowship, study and teaching of pacifism, and sermons. Materials range in date from 1893-1968. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional work of Elbert Russell, Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 to 1941. In addition to his sermons, articles and books, Russell authored many poems and a play. Much of the correspondence in the collection includes references to pacifism and concerns sermons, teaching, preaching, Quakerism, and formal publication of his writings. Some clippings and correspondence in the collection date from after Russell's death and discuss his life and work. These most likely were collected by colleagues or family members. Materials range in date from 1893-1968.

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Don Roy papers, 1921 - 1980 25.5 Linear Feet

Donald Francis Roy (1909-1980), noted industrial sociologist, was a faculty member at Duke University in the Department of Sociology from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. Roy's areas of specialization were field methods of sociological research and social conflict. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. English.

The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

While at Duke, Roy studied the attempts made by the Textile Workers Union of America to have union contracts accepted in some of the mills of Virginia and North Carolina. Between 1956-1959 and 1973-1979, Roy made detailed observations on the campaigns at the Hanes Knitting Company in Winston-Salem, N.C., 1956-1957; Elkin, N.C., 1956-1957; Chatham, Va., 1956; Burlington, N.C., 1957; Roanoke, Va., 1956 and 1965; Radford, Va., 1957; Vinton, Va., 1957; Dublin, Va., 1957; Altavista, Va., 1957; Henderson, N.C., 1958-1959; Roanoke Rapids, N.C., 1964-1979; Wallace, N.C., 1974 and 1977; Laurinburg, N.C., 1977-1979. The bulk of the information about these campaigns can be found in Boxes 1-5 and Boxes 14-19. Manuscripts on the Sheffield and Tyndall campaigns can be found in Box 1.

In addition, Roy followed the disputes involving the Teamsters Union in Atlanta, Ga., 1966, and the attempt by Local 77 of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees to establish a union at Duke Hospital in the 1960s and 1970s. Throughout his life, Roy took detailed field notes, collected materials, and retained correspondence about his industrial studies. These materials are scattered throughout the collection.

In 1965-1966, Roy spent a year on sabbatical at Cornell University. During that year, Roy wrote case studies on the Tyndall Garment Co., the Sheffield and Laurel Campaigns, the Burlington Campaign, the Corinth Study, and the Labor Organizing Campaign. Roy's field notes and observations are included in the collection.

Roy used pseudonyms, to protect confidentiality, for the names of the people and places he studied. Box 14 contains a list of the pseudonyms Roy used in his case studies. The following list gives the actual name followed by the pseudonym used by Roy in some of his studies and in his folder titles.

Missing Title
Hanes Knitting
Tyndall Garments
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Lancaster
Elkin, N.C.
Laurel
Chatham, Va.
Sheffield
Burlington, N.C.
Jefferson
Roanoke, Va.
Statesboro
Radford, Va.
Zebulon
Vinton, Va.
Corinth
Dublin, Va.
Indian Hills
Altavista, Va.
Cartersville
Roanoke Rapids, N.C.
Clearwater

Box 6 contains files for a book begun by Roy about his interest and involvement in union organizing. The book was not completed. The collection file contains Mrs. Roy's outline of the book's organization.

The collection file includes a paper by Huw Beynon with notes and comments about Roy's papers. Beynon's manuscript offers a proposed classification for the collection and outlines themes of Roy's work. The collection file also includes a biographical sketch by Dr. Joy K. Roy, Roy's second wife.

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Gilbert Theodore Rowe papers, 1878-1965 1 Linear Foot — 750 Items

Gilbert Theodore Rowe was born in Salisbury, NC on September 10, 1875. His father was Joseph Columbus Rowe, a Methodist minister. He received his A.B. and D.D. from Trinity College in 1895 and 1914, respectively. He earned his S.T.D. at Temple University in 1905 and was awarded a Litt.D. from Duke University in 1925. In 1928, he returned to Duke University as Professor and Chair of Christian Doctrine and remained until his retirement in 1949. The collection includes correspondence, clippings and Dr. Rowe's sermon notes, as well as material pertaining to his father, Joseph Columbus Rowe. The collection ranges in date from 1878-1965

Materials include Dr. Rowe's sermon notes, correspondence, and clippings. His sermon notes are largely handwritten and often appear on the back of other material, such as correspondence, letterhead, envelopes, church bulletins, and programs. The collection also includes some material concerning Dr. Rowe's father, Joseph Columbus Rowe (1848-1920). The collection ranges in dates from 1878-1965.

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Paul S. Robinson papers, 1932-1941 0.5 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Paul Robinson was an organist at the Duke University Chapel from 1932-1941. The collection includes programs for Chapel and Duke musical events, clippings, and other material related to the Duke Summer School Choir. It ranges in date from 1932-1941.

Collection includes newspaper clippings about Robinson's organ recitals in the Duke University Chapel, as well as programs for organ and carillon recitals and Chapel worship services. Also includes miscellaneous programs for event sin the Chapel, and a booklet of photos, entitled "Campus Views." Includes program from what was probably the first organ recital in the Chapel on June 1, 1932. The collection ranges in date from 1932-1941.

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Dorothy E. Roberts papers, 1903-1993 2.5 Linear Feet — approx. 2000 Items

Dorothy Roberts worked in the Dept. of English's administration office from 1948 until her retirement in the late 1980's-early 1990's. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed material and other items created and collected by Dorothy Roberts about the Dept. of English at Duke University. Files largely pertain to the history of the department, focusing heavily on departmental faculty. The collection ranges in date from 1903-1993.

The collection largely consists of material compiled by Roberts, who functioned as historian of the Dept. of English. Of note are the various lists of faculty, Ph.D. candidates and staff of the department over a number of years. Also included are files she maintained on faculty members, which include correspondence and clippings as well as a file Roberts kept on herself regarding her career at Duke. She also provides her impressions of key departmental staff, namely the chairmen she worked for. In 1982, Roberts donated 14 letters between her and Guy Davenport, a Duke alumnus, regarding Paris and other European cities as well of Davenport's appreciation of James Joyce and Roberts' own love of traveling abroad. Roberts' friendship with Reynolds Price is represented in the collection. There are several folders on him which include correspondence, Christmas cards, photographs, clippings, and an envelope which holds locks of Price's hair. Of particular note is a sketch Price drew of Emily Dickinson that he gave to Roberts. There is also a caricature of Ph.D. candidates, including Price, from 1962.

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James Fred Rippy papers, 1926-1935 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

James Fred Rippy was a professor in the Department of History at Duke from 1926-1936. The collection consists of copies of correspondence created by Dr. Rippy as well as some miscellaneous material. The collection ranges in date from 1926-1935.

Contains the correspondence of James Fred Rippy while he was a member of the Department of History at Duke. They are largely copies of his own letters. The collection ranges in date from 1926-1935.

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McMurry Richey papers, 1935-1985 15 Linear Feet

Dr. McMurry Richey was a faculty member of the Duke Divinity School and long-time director of the school's continuing education program. His papers cover a variety of topics, including materials related to continuing education, Duke Divinity School's annual convocation, the church and society, ethics, race relations, Duke's integration, and poverty.

This collection is divided into nine series, each representing a different aspect of Dr. Richey's work.

The Convocation and Pastor's School papers series covers the planning, publicity, correspondence, speaker invitations, and other aspects of the annual convocation held at Duke.

The Continuing Education series covers Richey's work as director of continuing education for the Divinity School and includes research and publications on continuing education, lecture notes, workshop materials, materials concerning other continuing education programs, correspondence, and memoranda.

The Curriculum Committee series has materials related to the Divinity School curriculum and the revision process it underwent during Richey's time at Duke.

The Junior Seminars series covers the syllabi and lesson plans for various sections of Junior seminars.

Reports, Research and Correspondence covers Richey's research into a variety of topics, including the church, race, poverty, the ministry, and lectureships as well as correspondence with professional colleagues and ministers on the same.

Early Course Materials and Student Work consists of Richey's graduate work, notes, and (ungraded) copies of work completed by Richey's students. Also included are materials related to race relations, integration of Duke University, reactionary exteremism, and social reform.

Ethics contains notes on different ethical systems and were likely used as lesson outlines for teaching.

Laity and Related Topics is an accumulation of publications and correspondence surrounding the interaction of lay people with theology and the ministry.

Church and Society Programs contains materials examining the links between the church, ethical sytems, business, poverty, and race.

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Calla Raynor papers, 1952-1980 6 Linear Feet

Calla Raynor began her career at Duke in the Physical Education department in 1962 and served as the women’s varsity tennis coach from 1967 to 1973. Raynor was instrumental in co-founding Duke University's women's basketball program. This collection contains correspondence, teaching materials, materials related to Ms. Raynor’s education at the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina (now UNC-Greensboro), UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke University. The collection also includes sporting event materials, student athlete records, tournament materials, newspaper clippings, audiovisual materials, collegiate sports institutions and organizations for women, and other records from Raynor’s career at Duke.

This collection contains correspondence, teaching materials, materials related to Ms. Raynor’s undergraduate coursework at the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina (now UNC-Greensboro) and graduate coursework at UNC-Chapel Hill, sporting event materials, student athlete records, tournament materials, newspaper clippings, photographs, and other records. Materials are related to Duke University’s sports program, as well as materials from other universities and colleges. The collection includes articles and publications related to physical education instruction, primarily from outside sources. Although Raynor's teaching files are included, such as quizzes and exams, most of the published articles were authored by individuals outside of Duke University.

Sports association materials include materials from the early 1970s to the early 1980s -- these materials include records from the Division of Girls’ and Women’s Sports (DGWS), which became the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women in 1971.

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Henry E. Rauch papers, 1963-1992 2 Linear Feet

Henry E. Rauch was an accountant, businessman, and executive who served on the Board of Trustees of Duke University. An executive and Chairman of the Board at Burlington Industries, he served on Duke's Board of Trustees from 1964-1974. He largely was responsible for the Trustee response to the Duke Vigil in 1968 and closely involved with the expansion of the Duke Medical Center from 1970-1978. The Henry E. Rauch papers include materials related to Henry Rauch's time as a member of the Duke University Board of Trustees, some autobiographical notes on Henry Rauch's personal and professional life, and excerpts from Board of Trustee meeting minutes related to Henry Rauch. Much of the material related to Rauch's tenure in the Board of Trustees was gathered together as a scrapbook, and includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, reports, and typed notes on his particular role and involvement in events, such as the Duke Vigil and in the development of the Duke Medical Center.

The Henry E. Rauch papers include materials related to Henry Rauch's time as a member of the Duke University Board of Trustees, as well as some autobiographical notes on Henry Rauch's personal and professional life. Much of the material related to Rauch's tenure in the Board of Trustees was gathered together as a scrapbook, and includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, reports, and typed notes on his particular role and involvement in events, such as the Duke Vigil and in the development of the Duke Medical Center. Also included are excerpts from Board of Trustee meeting minutes relating to Henry Rauch, often including handwritten annotations by him.

The collection is arranged into five series: Autobiographical materials, Duke Scrapbooks, Board of Trustees meeting minutes excerpts, Photographs, and Awards. Autobiographical materials include copies of typed chapters describing Henry Rauch's personal and professional life not including his involvement with Duke University. Duke Scrapbooks include materials which were gathered into scrapbooks by Henry Rauch and were disassembled prior to their transfer to the University Archives; these include materials related to Rauch's involvement in Board of Trustees committees, particularly related to the Medical Center and the Duke Vigil in 1968. Board of Trustees meeting minutes excerpts relate to the actions and contributions of Henry Rauch, and many include his handwritten annotations and explanations. Photographs and Awards both include oversized materials, many of which are mounted on boards and were removed from frames. These relate to Rauch's involvement with the Board of Trustees, the Medical Center Board of Visitors, and outside organizations.

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Benjamin U. Ratchford papers, 1924 - 1980 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

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Benjamin U. Ratchford (1902-1977) served as professor of economics at Duke University from 1928-1960. An expert in public finance, Ratchford was involved a number of economic policy projects, including the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. The papers consist of correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, clippings, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects include Duke Univ. administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the U.S. War Department, and monetary regulation. English.

The Benjamin U. Ratchford Papers contain correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects present within the collection include the Duke University administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the United States War Department, and monetary regulation.

The papers are organized into two series, Correspondence and Subject Files. The Correspondence series contains correspondence with a number of individuals and organizations relating to Ratchford's work as a professor, researcher, economic advisor, and editor. The correspondence also outlines his role as vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Subject Files series covers various topics, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the Duke University Economics Department, teaching materials, the resignation of President A. Hollis Edens, the Office of Price Administration, economics organizations, and economics subjects. Also present in this series are several travel logs, including a scrapbook documenting a 1936 road trip across the country and a journal kept during Ratchford's 1945-1946 trip to Berlin working as an Economic Advisor for Level of Industry to the Office of Military Government for Germany.

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Robert S. Rankin papers, 1898 - 1977 (bulk 1927 - 1976) 30 Linear Feet — 20,000 Items

Robert Stanley Rankin (1899-1976) taught political science at Duke beginning in 1927 and was chairman of the political science department from 1949 to 1964. He retired from teaching in 1969. The collection includes departmental records, correspondence, reports, notes, student papers, questionnaires, publications, and other materials of Robert S. Rankin and the Duke University Department of Political Science. English.

The collection includes departmental records, correspondence, reports, notes, student papers, questionnaires, publications, and other materials of Robert S. Rankin and the Duke University Department of Political Science, circa 1927-1977.

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Arthur M. Proctor papers, 1906 - 1967 5.5 Linear Feet — 4000 Items

Arthur Marcus Proctor (1886-1955) was a professor in the Department of Education at Duke University. He also served as Director of the Duke Summer Session for several years. The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education. English.

The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education.

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Richard A. Preston papers, circa 1745-1987 (bulk 1956-1987) 36 Linear Feet — 36000 Items

Richard Arthur Preston (b. 1910), a leading British Commonwealth scholar, was appointed the William K. Boyd Professor of History at Duke University in 1965. Major subjects of the collection include Canadian history, especially military history; the Department of History; and the Canadian Studies program at Duke. Materials include correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, and other papers. English.

Collection includes correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, drafts, research notes, manuscripts, lectures, photographs, clippings, maps, and other papers.

The arrangement of the collection is by accession dates. These additions follow the order given in the collection file and are not presented in chronological order.

The 1981 Additions (A81-60) include extensive correspondence, numerous drafts and published articles and reviews, photocopies of primary sources, some research notes, and administrative papers dealing with the Duke University History Dept. The chief subjects include Canadian military affairs, general military history, military education, and Canadian Studies as a historical subdiscipline. There is a folder list for this addition that is part of the collection file.

The 1980 Additions includes printed material, correspondence, studies, reports, articles, drafts, proofs, outlines, lectures, syllabi, clippings, photos, maps, and other papers. Major subjects include Canadian history, especially military history and current military and defense concerns. The first major portion of this Addition is made up of correspondence about Preston's own research and writings of other scholars. Other materials include Preston's research notes; photocopies and typed copies of historical documents; and guides to historical collections. There are also administrative files about the History Dept. at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Program. There is a small amount of material about the alumni of the Royal Military College in Canada, where Preston taught for a number of years. The second major portion of this Addition focuses on various aspects of modern Canadian defense and external security, Canada and NATO, relations with the British Commonwealth, and Canadian domestic affairs.

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Jack Preiss papers, 1940-2012 1.75 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Jack Joseph Preiss taught in the Dept. of Sociology at Duke University from 1959-1988. The materials in the collection pertain to Preiss' time at Camp William James in Vermont and race relations at Duke. The collection includes correspondence, photographs, clippings, and posters. It ranges in date from 1940-2012.

This collection consists of letters from Preiss to his mother, Mrs. Mary Sacks Preiss, and her two sisters, but there are some letters to Preiss from several friends whom he had met in a work-service camp in Tunbridge, Vermont [Camp William James]. The correspondence by Preiss is largely about the problems of organizing and operating the work-service camp, its being taken over by the CCC, the resignation of himself and some others from the CCC, and the re-establishment of the work-service camp. He also, however, writes quite a bit about social affairs.

The work-service idea was put into practice by Dr. Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, who taught social philosophy at Dartmouth and had founded the pre-Hitler work camps in Germany. He got some young, city boys of privileged backgrounds to join him in establishing the camp at Tunbridge. The camp was named for Professor William James, who had lectured on a moral equivalent of war, and the purpose of the camp was to give these men from the city experience in aiding farmers with their labor, in the hope that each group would profit from their association with each other and the farmers would have some much-needed labor. Dorothy Thompson, who had a summer home in the valley of the camp, gave this project continual assistance and encouragement. Preiss comments on her and her support in his letters.

The collection also includes clippings, largely about the work-service camp and several black and white photographs, presumably of the work-camp. In 2013, Dr. Preiss donated material on race relations at Duke. Included in this accession are two posters from Black Week at Duke, information on the 1988 Duke Vigil Reunion, Alan Kerckhoff's committee and his chronology of campus race relation events from 1969, a 1968 issue of Sports Illustrated with an article on Preiss and Duke called "The Timid Generation," an unpublished Preiss manuscript about race relations at Duke and other material.

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J. Gaither Pratt papers, 1963 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Pratt joined the psychology department at Duke in 1937 as an instructor and a member of the staff of parapsychology where he served for nearly 30 years. Contains two drafts of a manuscript entitled, The Benign Revolution: An Insider's View of Parapsychology. This was published by Doubleday in 1964 under the title Parapsychology: An insider's view of ESP.

Contains two drafts of a manuscript entitled, The Benign Revolution: An Insider's View of Parapsychology. This was published by Doubleday in 1964 under the title Parapsychology: An insider's view of ESP.

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Ella Fountain Pratt papers, circa 1850-2008 18 Linear Feet — 13,000 items

Ella Fountain Keesler Pratt (1914-2008) was a Duke University employee for almost thirty years. Ms. Pratt was also a patron of the arts and community organizer in Durham, North Carolina. This collection contains documents, records, photographs, and notes that document her life as a Duke employee and Durham arts organizer. Items include personal notebooks, photographs of family and events, art exhibition catalogs, and audio recordings of performances at Duke University. The collection materials range in date from circa 1850 to 2008.

The Ella Fountain Pratt Papers contain materials pertaining to Pratts's personal life and professional accomplishments. A majority of the collection is comprised of personal correspondence, records, and news clippings that document Ella's education, her participation in the Durham Arts scene, and her experiences as a longtime employee at Duke University. Newer accessions also include photographs (largely unidentified and undated) of both Ella and her husband as well as their sons and Mr. Pratt's family as well as genealogical information, Mr. Pratt's correspondence, and materials pertaining to his education and work at Duke University, in addition to his service in the U. S. Navy during World War II. Of note is a letter signed by Richard Nixon soon after he was defeated in the 1960 election. The collection also includes notable autographs of the various artists Ella Fountain Pratt encountered during her lifetime. Items in the collection range from circa 1850-2008, with the bulk from 1960-2000.

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Walter S. "Jack" Persons papers, 1937-2001 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Walter Scott "Jack" Persons served as swimming coach at Duke University from 1930 to 1979, and as Duke's lacrosse coach from 1949 to 1966. He was inducted into the Duke Sports Hall of Fame in 1986. Collection includes correspondence, programs, clippings, and photographs related to Jack Persons; the Duke University Physical Education Dept., swim team, and lacrosse team; and the Duke Sports Hall of Fame. Materials range in date from 1937 to 2001.

The materials include letters, greeting cards, invitations, programs, newspaper clippings, accolades, and photographs. The materials cover Persons's tenure as coach of both the Duke Swim team and the Duke Lacrosse team, as well as his election to and membership in the Duke Sports Hall of Fame.

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W. H. Pegram papers, 1876 - 1928 1.75 Linear Feet — 1700 Items

William Howell Pegram (1846-1928) was a student, professor, and administrator at Trinity College (N.C.). He moved with the school from Randolph County to Durham County (N.C.), and remained active as Trinity College evolved into Duke University. The W.H. Pegram Papers include correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material. His relationship with Braxton Craven, both professionally and personally, is detailed. Among the subjects in the collection are Pegram's main academic interest, chemistry, and the administration of Trinity College in both Randolph and Durham counties. English.

The W. H. Pegram Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material related to Pegram's career at Trinity College and later Duke University. The first series, Personal, is a brief series containing clippings and other material regarding Pegram's career and his death in 1928. The second series Correspondence, contains letters to and from Pegram, mainly regarding administrative issues at Trinity College. There are also some letters of thanks from former students. This series is arranged chronologically. The third series is Notebooks, and contains notebooks used by Pegram for a variety of purposes: to record the attendance and grades of his students, to prepare Sunday school lessons, to work on chemistry problems, and to write essays. The notebooks are arranged by title or subject, when available, then date. The fourth series, Writings, contains several essays prepared by Pegram, as well as shorter pieces. This series is also organized by title, when available, and then date. The last series, Trinity College, contains a variety of materials related to the history of the school. These materials are not all directly related to Pegram, but they provide a historical context for his other materials. It contains clippings, articles, financial papers, and print materials about the school. These papers are organized alphabetically.

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Arthur Sperry Pearse papers, 1904-1960 18 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Arthur Sperry Pearse (pronounced like "purse") was Professor of Zoology at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1948. Collection primarily contains papers and other items relating to his academic career: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also include landscapes, people, villages, and social customs from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and smaller groups from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the Outer Banks coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consist of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures. Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the publication Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

The Arthur Sperry Pearse papers include the professional papers and photographs of A. S. Pearse's scholarly career. His professional papers span the length of his academic career and include: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, book illustrations, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also landscapes, people, villages, and social aspects of life from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. Included are snapshots of fellow scientists in the laboratory and in the field. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the N.C. coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consists of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures.

Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the journal Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

Correspondence primarily reflects his role as editor of Ecological Monographs which includes correspondence concerning receipt of drafts for publication, recommended revisions, and future publication dates. Other prominent topics include Pearse's involvement with professional organizations, various symposiums and conferences, publications, research in Nigeria and the Yucatán, and the founding and early operations of the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina. Also, in 1938-1939, there is a series of correspondence between Pearse and President William Preston Few concerning lack of support for and conditions within the department and Pearse's consequent resignation as departmental chair.

Other materials include research notes, tables, and sketches; graduate student correspondence, plans of work, and dissertation abstracts; manuscripts of various publications authored by Pearse including Animal Ecology and his 1952 autobiography, Adventure: Trying to be an Ecologist; laboratory and field notebooks containing research notes and statistics from Nigeria, the Yucatan, Wisconsin, and various other research locations.

There are many photographic prints, nitrate and safety negatives, and glass-plate lecture slides, all documenting Pearse's research travels, particularly in Nigeria and the Yucatán, but also in Alabama, Florida, and coastal North Carolina, Japan, China, Burma, the Phillippines, Colombia, and Venezuela. Images include local flora, fauna, landscapes, villages, localized crafts and industries, and indigenous peoples, as well as maps, charts, tables, drawings, and photographs used in Pearse's lectures and publications.

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Dred and Ella Carr Peacock Scrapbooks, 1849-1903 (bulk 1897-1900) 1 Linear Foot

Seven scrapbooks of clippings related largely to Greensboro Female College and Trinity College (both Randolph County, NC and Durham, NC). Also included is a volume which lists articles related to North Carolina history.

This collection contains 7 scrapbooks and one notebook listing articles. It is unclear as to which Peacock created them, as both Dred and Ella had strong ties to the main subjects: Greensboro Female College and Trinity College (now Duke University). The scrapbooks include the Ethel Carr Peacock Memorial bookplate and consists largely of clippings and event programs as they pertain to both colleges. There are also clippings related to topics such as the American Civil War and local news and dignitaries. These volumes are fragile and should be handled with care. The notebook contains a list of newspaper and magazine articles on North Carolina history compiled by Dred Peacock and at least one other individual, possibly Charles Lee Raper.

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Bernard Peach papers, [1946 - 1992] 9 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

William Bernard Peach, emeritus professor, joined the Duke University Philosophy Department in 1951. Major subjects of the collection include student papers on philosophy; department business; and notes on Hegel, Descartes, Clarence I. Lewis, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The collection contains correspondence, recommendations, student papers, departmental minutes, lecture notes, and grant proposals. English.

Major subjects include student papers on philosophy; department business; and notes on Hegel, Descartes, Clarence I. Lewis, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The collection contains correspondence, student papers, departmental minutes, lecture notes, research notes, and grant proposals.

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Ransom Rathbone Patrick papers, 1940s-1960s 2.2 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Ransom Patrick was a painter, sculptor and professor of Aesthetics and Art at Duke from the 1940s through the 1960s. His collection includes course materials, photographs of artworks, essays, correspondence and news clippings. Materials range in date from the 1940s-1960s.

Collection contains course materials, Patrick's academic essays and lectures, academic and personal correspondence, Duke administrative and departmental memoranda and documents, photographs of Patrick's murals and sculptures, and news clippings relating to Duke University events.

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Harold T. Parker papers, 1914-2002 24.5 Linear Feet — 16,250 Items

Harold T. Parker taught history at Duke University from 1939-1977; he specialized in modern European history, European intellectual history and 19th century Europe. This collection contains material concerning Parker's experiences as a faculty member at Duke University, a soldier in World War II and as an author. The papers include correspondence, including v-mail, along with diaries, volumes, memoranda, reports, speeches, articles, photographs, essays, book drafts and other records.

This collection contains material concerning Parker's experiences as a faculty member at Duke University, a soldier in World War II and as an author. The papers include correspondence, including v-mail, along with diaries, volumes, memoranda, reports, speeches, articles, photographs, essays, book drafts and other records. The volume titles include Back Load and Sky Train, which are histories of troop carrier forces in the South Pacific during World War II.

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David Paletz Student films, 1975-1996 1 Linear Foot

The David Paletz Student Films were created by Duke students for David Paletz's POLI 130: Politics and Media course, with topics covering politics and Duke University.

The collection includes fims on seven U-matic and nine VHS cassette tapes that cover a variety of topics related to politics and Duke University.

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Robert T. Osborn papers, 1963-1967 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Robert Osborn was a Professor of Religion at Duke University. His collection includes clippings, correspondence and trial-related documents relating to a civil rights protest in Chapel Hill in January 1964.

Contains clippings, correspondence, subpoenas, summons and statements relating to a January 1964 civil rights demonstration in Chapel Hill, and subsequent trials in Hillsboro. Correspondence and court documents are photocopies.

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Henry J. Oosting papers, 1919-1968 7 Linear Feet

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Correspondence, field notes, writings,photographs and other subject files of Henry J. Oosting, Professor of Botany and Chairman of the Department of Botany at Duke University from 1931 to 1962. Major subjects include the ecology of virgin forests, vegetation on bare rocks, maritime vegetation in the Southeastern United States, North Carolina vegetation, the 1937 Louise A. Boyd expedition to Greenland with the American Geographical Society, the Victory Garden project in Durham, N.C., the Ecological Society of America, and the serial Ecological Monographs.

The papers include correspondence, field notes, and other research notes of Henry J. Oosting. The collection is representative of Oosting's research in forest ecology, vegetation on bare rocks, and plants of North Carolina. The papers also document his participation in the 1937 Louise A. Boyd Expedition to Greenland, his participation in the governance and research of the Highlands Biological Station (Highlands, N.C.), and his participation in the Ecological Society of America. Much of the correspondence is between Oosting and colleagues at Duke University, including H. L. Blomquist and Lewis R. Anderson; colleagues throughout the United States; and former graduate students. Other files include family correspondence, as well as reports and correspondence from the Duke University Research Council, 1949-1963.

In June 2007, accession UA2007-0019 was added to the collection. This accession includes photographs from the 1937 Louise A. Boyd Expedition to Greenland. Subjects featured are glaciers; Kjerulf Fjord; Tromso, Norway; Jan Mayen Island; Cape Alfred; Clavering Isle; landscape; and native plants. In addition to the individual photos there are also six annotated photo posters. Photos are by Louise A. Boyd. Also included is Oosting's diary. The diary includes his reactions and observations about his travel to Eastern Greenland and return through England during the summer of 1937 on the Louise A. Boyd Expedition.

Nitrate negatives have been scanned and are available online. The original nitrate negatives are not available for use in the reading room.

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Fletcher Nelson papers, 1901-1981 4 Linear Feet

This collection contains the papers of Dr. Fletcher Nelson, a Methodist minister and Assistant to the Dean of Development of the Duke Divinity School. It consists entirely of subject files and notes for the sermons Dr. Nelson gave during his career as a minister.

The collection consists of two series, the first of which consists of subject files containing publications related to topics on which Dr. Nelson preached. The second series consists of sermons Dr. Nelson wrote and gave while he was an active minister in Greensboro, Rutherfordton, Forest City, Morganton, and Charlotte, North Carolina.

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Ernest W. Nelson records and papers, 1913 - 1975 (bulk 1926-1974) 10.5 Linear Feet — 10500 Items

Ernest William Nelson (1896-1974) was a professor of history at Duke University (1926-1965). His primary interest was Italian Renaissance cultural history. Nelson founded the Durham Chamber Arts Society (1945) and was chairman from 1945-1963. Major subjects include the Duke University Dept. of History, the Chamber Arts Society, and cultural life on campus. The collection contains correspondence, financial records, lectures, reports, student papers, and other printed material. English.

The Ernest W. Nelson Records and Papers is divided into three series: Subject Files, the Chamber Arts Society, and Personal and Family Materials. The collection includes correspondence, financial records, lectures, reports, student papers, and other printed material.

The Subject Files Series, 1926-1973, is mainly concerned with the internal functioning of the university, the history department, cultural life on campus, and faculty organizations. A number of student folders are filed in this section, under "History Dept.: Students." Nelson selected these particular folders to give examples of his grading system, to show some of his students' work, and to cover the span of Nelson's years at Duke. The folders of those students who achieved prominence are also included in this section.

The Chamber Arts Society Series, 1945-1975, contains financial records, membership lists, programs, and correspondence. Nelson founded the Durham Chamber Arts Society in 1945 to offer members of the Durham and Duke communities an opportunity to further their appreciation of the fine arts. The Chamber Arts Society began by presenting chamber music concerts in the East Duke Music Room at Duke University. Nelson was chairman of the Chamber Arts Society until 1963.

Most of the Personal and Family Materials Series, 1913-1966, is made up of correspondence and concerns family matters, health problems, and descriptions of short excursions such as bicycle outings and shopping trips.

Some of the correspondence includes information about current world events. In letters to Nelson, economics professor Calvin Bryce Hoover described life in the Soviet Union in 1929, and the upcoming German elections in 1932. In 1939, Shelby McCloy described the reaction in France to the outbreak of World War II and faculty members' assignments during the war. In 1943, several Duke faculty members described the effects of the war on Duke University. Professor William B. Hamilton wrote about how teaching loads had greatly increased due to the large number of V-12 naval and marine cadets who were sent to Duke. Alan K. Manchester described the Navy syllabus used to teach World History and how the war changed civilian life. Several letters from William T. Laprade discussed the impact of the war on the history department and the effect of the draft on faculty.

Nelson carried on lengthy correspondence with some of his students, many of whom either went abroad or entered graduate schools, and with a number of scholars at other institutions. Among these scholars are Carl Becker, Roland Bainton, Preserved Smith, George Lincoln Burr, Theodore Mommsen, and Hans Baron.

A folder list is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 1 and Box 6 are closed pending processing.

Access to the folders containing student records is RESTRICTED. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

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Sydney Nathans collection, 1975-2018 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 1 oversize folder

The papers in this collection include Duke history professor Sydney Nathans' documentation on the Richard Nixon Presidential Library debate, including his participation in Academic Council resolutions regarding the location of the library on Duke's campus; the Greensboro Massacre (1979), when the Ku Klux Klan murdered several people during a shoot-out at an Anti-KKK demonstration planned by the Communist Workers' Party; Nathans' copies of negatives and contact sheets from the Durham bicentennial photography project (1981 and undated); and materials used in the writing of his book A Mind to Stay, including original interviews, transcripts, and other research materials.

The Nixon Library papers contain correspondence (including that of Terry Sanford, and of the creator of the collection, Sydney Nathans); newspaper and magazine clippings as well as scholarly articles; text from speeches; official statements from groups opposing the Nixon Library; and Sydney Nathan's handwritten notes from a variety of meetings. Documents also include Nathan's research on existing presidential libraries.

The Greensboro Massacre papers contain flyers and other mailings and newsletters from the Communist Workers Party and other socialist organizations; mailings from Greensboro Justice Fund and other sympathetic groups following the massacre; media and press coverage of the massacre and the subsequent trials; a police report from Greensboro's police chief; academic and other literature researching the history of violence between the Communist and Klan organizations; and other miscellaneous materials.

The Durham Bicenntenial photography project relates to a project now held in the Durham Arts Council and consists of negatives and contact sheets for a photographic history of Durham assembled in 1981.

The A Mind to Stay Interviews and Transcripts contain materials used by Sydney Nathans in writing his book A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland, on the descendants of enslaved families forced to migrate from North Carolina to plantations in Greensboro, Alabama, and Tunica, Mississippi, in 1844, and the communities those families formed in the following years. Materials include recordings of interviews with residents of the two towns, Nathans' transcripts and extensive notes of those interviews, photos of interviewees and local landmarks, background material and research, the text of speeches and eulogies, and Nathans' personal correspondence with historians, editors, and Greensboro, Alabama, residents.

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Hiram Earl Myers papers, 1910 - 1977 4.5 Linear Feet — 4500 Items

Hiram Earl Myers was a clergyman, theologian, and educator. He was ordained as a minister in the N.C. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1918) and was an active member as pastor and theologian. In 1926, Myers joined the Duke University faculty in as professor of biblical literature. He served as Chairman of the Department of Religion (1934-1936) and as Director of Undergraduate Studies in Religion (1937-1957). The collection consists of correspondence; texts of sermons and Sunday School lessons; prayers given in Duke Chapel; records of sermons, baptisms, and marriages; notes on sermon topics; photographs; pamphlets; blueprints; and other printed material. Major subjects include Myers' activities as a clergyman, his reflections on theological issues, and his involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The collection reflects Myers' activities as a clergyman and his thoughts on theological issues. The collection consists of correspondence; texts of sermons and Sunday School lessons; prayers given in Duke Chapel; records of sermons, baptisms, and marriages; notes on sermon topics; pamphlets; and other printed material. Major subjects include Myers' activities as a clergyman, his reflections on theological issues, and his involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The Writings and Speeches Series is an important part of the collection. It includes the typed and manuscript texts of approximately three hundred sermons and Sunday School lessons given by Myers throughout his career as a minister, prayers used in Duke Chapel, and other writings.

The Correspondence Series includes correspondence with colleagues and family. Individual items of particular interest are letters from R.L. Flowers dealing with the aftermath of the deaths of James B. Duke and William Preston Few. Other correspondents include Sarah Pearson Duke, Josephus Daniels, Horace R. Kornegay, Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Y.E. Smith, William A. Erwin, and William B. Umstead. A few items within the correspondence deal with local Methodist affairs in the N.C. conference, particularly with ministerial appointments. Most of the correspondence is routine, although it occasionally reflects historical events such as the Great Depression and World War II.

Other series in the collection include Personal and Family Papers, Pastoral Records, Lake Junaluska, Duke University, and Subject Files.

Material directly related to Duke University is scanty. There are three folders of tests and examinations administered by Myers in his classes. Individual items of interest include Myers' reminiscences at the the 1960 alumni reunion and a copy of a poetic tribute to B. N. Duke by Wilbur F. Tillett of Vanderbilt University in 1928.

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Samuel Fox Mordecai papers, 1869-1985 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Samuel Fox Mordecai (1852-1927) was a lawyer who served as Dean of Trinity College Law School from around 1905 to 1927. The collection covers mainly the period between 1871 and Mordecai's death in 1927 and largely consists of correspondence and some law-themed periodicals.

Contents of the Samuel Fox Mordecai Papers span from 1869 to 1985 with the bulk dates 1871-1923 and include correspondence, telegrams, receipts, grade reports, volumes, clippings, other printed material, and photographs. The Papers are arranged into three series: Correspondence and Miscellany, 1869-1985; Printed Material, 1912-1932; and Photographs, 1938 and undated. The correspondence is arranged chronologically. Most of the collection was arranged by the former Manuscript Department before being transferred to University Archives.

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Theodore W. "Ted" Minah records and papers, 1941-1975 and undated 41.4 Linear Feet

Theodore W. "Ted" Minah, was the Director of Duke University Dining Halls from 1946-1974. Over his 28 years at Duke, Minah worked hard to serve the best quality food at as low a price as possible without incurring deficit to the University. By his retirement in 1974, Minah had transformed the dining halls at Duke University from a small operation to an operation of 12 dining halls serving approximately 15,000 meals per day. Materials in the collection include administrative records, work and purchase orders, food pricing, menus, financial and statistical reports, job descriptions, survey results, banquet logs, blueprints, union handbooks, black and white and color photographs, and other materials documenting the activities of the Duke University Dining Halls and the Director of Dining Halls.

The Theodore W. "Ted" Minah records and papers span the years 1941-1975, with the bulk of the materials ranging from 1946-1974. The collection is arranged into three series: Administrative Records, 1945-1975, Articles and Speeches, 1941-1975 and Correspondence, 1945-1974. Administrative Records are further arranged into three subseries: Blueprints, Daily Banquet Logs, and General Administrative Records.

Materials in the collection include administrative records, correspondence, work and purchase orders, food pricing, menus, financial and statistical reports, job descriptions, survey results, banquet logs, blueprints, union handbooks, black and white and color photographs, and other materials documenting the activities of both the Duke University Dining Halls and the Director of Dining Halls, as well as well as Ted Minah's affiliations with professional associations.

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Christine Mimms papers, 1946-1986 0.5 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Christine Mimms served as secretary/executive assistant to six Duke Presidents, from President William Few to President Terry Sanford. The collection contains correspondence, clippings, photographs and other materials. The material ranges in date from 1946-1986.

Contains correspondence, photographs, postcards, clippings and other materials primarily concerning Mrs. Mimms' career as secretary to Duke's presidents. The collection includes letters from Dr. Knight, Mr. Sanford, W. M. Upchurch and other University figures and the memorial volume from her husband's funeral. The material ranges in date from 1946-1986.

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Eric M. and Carol L. Meyers papers, 1970-2019 60.0 Linear Feet — 53 boxes; 9 oversize folders — 7 Gigabytes — 1296 files

Eric M. and Carol L. Meyers are professors in Duke University's Department of Religion. Throughout their careers, they have conducted archeological digs in relation to their interest in biblical and Judaic studies. The collection contains extensive materials related to several major excavations the pair conducted in Israel from the 1970s to the 1990s. The materials in the collection include binders and notebooks of field notes, charts, maps, and records; notecards; photographs (including slides, prints, and negatives), almost all black-and-white; a few audiovisual items; clippings; some administrative and correspondence files; coins; and drawings of sites and artifacts. There are many electronic files, some of which represent items not present in the collection. Topics include 20th century archaeology and practices; the Sepphoris, Meiron, Khirbet Shema, Nabratein, and Gush Halav excavation sites in Israel, including maps and photographs of the sites; Jewish and Arabic artifacts such as coins and pottery; other ancient artifacts; and religious and biblical studies as they relate to archaeology.

The collection contains extensive materials related to several major excavations conducted by the Meyers and their teams in Israel from the 1970s to the 1990s, as well as materials related to later publications about their work. Formats include binders and notebooks of field notes, charts, and records; maps; notecards; photographs (including many slides, prints, and negatives); coins; news clippings; a few video and audio recordings; some administrative and correspondence files; and many drawings of sites and artifacts. There are also electronic records, most of which are black-and-white scans of photographs, negatives, and field notebooks, and drawings, many of these, but not all, are scans of items located in the collection.

Topics represented by the materials include 20th century archaeology and practices; the Sepphoris, Meiron, Khirbet Shema, Nabratein, and Gush Halav excavation sites in Israel, including maps and many photographs of the sites; Jewish and Arabic artifacts such as coins and pottery; other ancient artifacts; and religious and biblical studies as they relate to archaeology.

Materials have been kept in the binders and folders in which they were received. The collection is organized by accession number, but materials in separate accession number groups are intrinsically connected.

The addition (A2003-30) includes binders from an archeological dig in Gush Halav, and Arabic and Jewish coins from the Meiron and Khirbet Shema digs.

Accessions from 2010 and 2017 include materials from archeological digs in Nabratein, Meiron, Gush Halav, and Khirbet Shema.

The accessions from 2019 include materials from digs in Khirbet Shema, Gush Halav, Nabratein, Meiron, and Sepphoris, among other materials. Also received in 2019 are over 1200 digital files from the Sepphoris site, which have been migrated to a library server.

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Otto Meier, Jr., records and papers, 1931 - 1979 20.5 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

Otto Meier, Jr., (1908-1979), professor emeritus of electrical engineering, taught at Duke University from 1934 to 1975. Meier's specialties were electrical machinery and control, illumination, explosives, nucleonics, and experimental nuclear physics. Meier was active in the Southeastern Electric Exchange; the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca. 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975); and the Engineers Club (Durham, N.C.). Meier was a consultant engineer with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab and helped to plan the facility. The collection contains correspondence, lecture and course notes, photographs, reports, minutes, newsletters, slides, lantern slides, black-and-white negatives, and other materials pertaining to professional organizations, regional utilities, faculty and university affairs, curriculum, and other subjects related to the College of Engineering, engineering student organizations, and the domestic use of nuclear power. English.

The Otto Meier, Jr., Records and Papers is divided into eight major series: Personal and Biographical Files; General Subject Files; Duke University; School of Engineering; Organizations; Papers and Articles; Photos and Slides; and the records of the Tau Beta Pi.

The Personal and Biographical Files Series contains Meier's Ph.D. thesis; texts of his lectures and addresses; materials documenting conferences he attended; and materials used on his trips as a Duke University Admissions Office representative to regional high schools. Also, in this series are very extensive files on the courses Meier taught at Duke. These files include detailed notes, projects, tests, solutions to test questions, and course evaluations.

The General Subject Files mainly contain correspondence, memoranda, and reports that document Meier's committee work at Duke. There is considerable material on the Faculty Club and on ROTC, and a minor amount on early computers at Duke. There are documents (agendas, papers, and programs) that deal with the activities of the Southeastern Electric Exchange, a regional utilities group, whose meetings Meier frequently attended.

The Duke University Series consists mainly of minutes and memoranda of the University Council/Academic Council (1953-1973); the Graduate Faculty and its executive committee; the University Faculty (1953-1973); and the University Faculty Council/Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (1967-1972). One binder contains minutes, correspondence, reports, and budgets of the Duke University Church and its Board (1953-1956). There are several folders of University memoranda on a variety of topics (1935-1942).

The School of Engineering Series contains the minutes and related papers of the School of Engineering, known as the College of Engineering until 1966. It includes materials from the Engineering Administrative Council (1968-1974), Engineering Faculty (1953-1974), and the Engineering Faculty Council (1947-1974). In some cases the accounts and comments are more detailed than those in the published minutes. This series also has general information on topics such as administrators; articles and papers by Duke University faculty and students; the Board of Visitors; the engineering building, former faculty, and research and development.

The Dept. of Electrical Engineering is an important subseries within the School of Engineering Series. It contains files on curriculum (1953-1954), minutes of the graduate faculty (1963-1964), and "status reports" from the years 1957, 1962, and 1967. This includes compilations of staff rosters, course descriptions, vitae, and available facilities. There is a sizeable collection of folders entitled "Staff," (1953-1954), that contain minutes of the electrical engineering faculty meetings, memoranda, reports, and other papers on general policies.

The Organizations Series contains correspondence, newsletters, minutes of regional conferences for twenty different organizations. The largest collections concern the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); and the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975). There are also extensive materials from the Durham, N.C., Engineers Club (ca. 1944-1974), in which Meier was an active member. Some organizations are represented by only a few items retained by Meier. There are two folders on Phi Beta Kappa at Duke (1962) and Sigma Xi (ca. 1939-1974).

The Papers and Articles Series includes addresses and papers given by others at various engineering conferences in the 1950-1960s. Of note are the papers from the Southeastern Electric Exchange on technical, electrical, and electronics subjects. Included are speeches by officials of utility companies on nuclear power in its early days.

The Photographs and Slides Series illustrates the life of engineering students in the 1930s; the engineering building (Southgate) and laboratory on East Campus; West Campus; and the construction of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. There are lantern slides that contain diagrams of nuclear particle processes, schematics for a Van de Graaff accelerator, and photographs of the installation of the 4MeV Van de Graaff in the nuclear facility of the Physics Dept. There are also 3 and 1/2 inch x 5 inch slides for a presentation on "Electric Power Utilities - Trends and Nuclear Outlook."

The slides are fragile. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

The Tau Beta Pi Series contains material from the North Carolina Gamma Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national engineering honorary, established at Duke University on Jan. 10, 1948. The material contains banquet initiation programs (1949-1970), correspondence, bulletins, and printed material on the history, purpose, constitution, and other aspects of Tau Beta Pi. It includes two large bound volumes, "Book of the Chairman of the Advisory Board," (1948-1950, 1950-1958). There is also a large amount of material on the National Convention of 1960. Access to Boxes 17-18 is RESTRICTED: Student Records.

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William McDougall papers, 1892 - 1982 9.5 Linear Feet — 10000 Items

William McDougall (1871-1938), an early twentieth century psychologist, taught at Duke University from 1927 to 1938. McDougall espoused a hormic theory of psychology, emphasizing genetics and instinct over nurture. McDougall was also a strong proponent of parapsychology. The William McDougall Papers, 1892-1982, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, notebooks, photographs, diaries, drawings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Major subjects include Lamarckian experiments conducted by McDougall, the McDougall family (and sons Kenneth and Angus in particular), the study of parapsychology, the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University, the Psychology Department at Duke University, and anthropological studies in Borneo and the Torres Strait. English.

The William McDougall Papers date from 1892 to 1982, and contain McDougall's own papers as well as those of his family and other researchers. The collection is organized into three series. The first series, Professional, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the late 1920s to the late 1930s, the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Of particular note is his correspondence with other scholars in the fields of psychology and the social sciences. A card file which indexes these correspondents is available with the collection. McDougall's notes from his Lamarckian experiments on rats can also be found here, as can photograph albums from his anthropological travels in the late 1890s. The Family series contains correspondence, notebooks, photographs, clippings, writings, research and education materials, diaries, drawings, and other materials. Many materials belonging to two of McDougall's sons, Kenneth and Angus, are filed here. The third series, Other Researchers, contains writings and correspondence written by other researchers about McDougall or about McDougall's influence on psychology. These materials were not directly related to or owned by McDougall; most were generated after his death.

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Thomas E. McCollough papers, 1965-1997 3 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

Thomas McCollough was a professor of religion at Duke University from 1961-1997. His collection includes correspondence, memoranda, minutes, course materials, and other papers relating to the Religion Department, the Twentieth Century American Program, university-related committees, and other activities. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1997.

Collection contains correspondence, memoranda, minutes, course materials, and other papers and records with bulk dates 1983-1996. Major topics include the Department of Religion, the Twentieth Century America Program, and courses in ethics, community and public policy, along with materials concerning community service and related activities at Duke. While some files still contain student recommendations, student grades and social security numbers were destroyed.

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Sidney D. Markman papers, 1952-1986 1.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

In 1947, Dr. Markman began teaching at Duke University as Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology and was appointed to full professor in 1965. He retired in 1981 and is Professor Emeritus of Art History and Archaeology in 1981. The collection includes four 3-ring binders kept by Professor Markman that include his lecture notes and material for two of his courses: Latin American Art [Colonial Period] and Pre-Columbian Art and Archaeology [Mesoamerica]. There is also a folder that contains correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1952-1986.

The collection includes four 3-ring binders kept by Professor Markman that include his lecture notes and material for two of his courses: Latin American Art [Colonial Period] and Pre-Columbian Art and Archaeology [Mesoamerica]. There is also a folder that contains correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1952-1986.

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Alan K. Manchester papers, 1905-1975 2 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

Alan K. Manchester (1897-1983) served as a faculty member in the Department of History at Duke University (1929-1967). Administrative positions held at Duke include Assistant Dean of Trinity College (1934), Dean of Freshmen (1935-1949), Dean of Undergraduate Studies (1949-1956), and Dean of Trinity College (1956-1964). Manchester also worked as a cultural affairs officer at the United States Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (1951-1952) and as a specialist for the U. S. State Department's International Exchange Service Program (Summers of 1954-55). Papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator. Major subjects include Latin American and South American history and economic and political relations between Brazil and Great Britain. The majority of the material is in English. Some material is in Spanish and Portuguese.

Collection consists of correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries, bulk 1929-1970. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator

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Olav K. Lundeberg papers, circa 1940s- 0.25 Linear Feet — 12 Items

Olav K. Lundeberg taught at Duke in the Dept. of Romance Languages from 1931-1948. This collection includes photographs, a bulletin, and a guest log from social events hosted by Lundeberg and his wife.

The collection includes a copy of the 1949 February "Bulletin of Duke University: School of Spanish Studies," photographs, and a guest log of social events hosted by Lundeberg and his wife.

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Mary Alves Long papers, 1944-1953 (bulk 1950) 0.2 Linear Feet — approximately 100 Items

Mary Alves Long was born in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1864. She graduated from Peace Institute [College] in Raleigh, NC and eventually earned a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Her autobiography High Time to Tell It was published by the Duke University Press in 1950. The bulk of the material is from 1950, after Mary Alves Long's book was published. Correspondence makes up the majority of the papers. There is one postcard dated 1944 and a letter dated 1953. The rest is dated 1950. Also included in the collection is a book jacket from her book High Time to Tell Itas well as clippings and a few photographs.

The bulk of the material is from 1950, after Mary Alves Long's book was published. Correspondence makes up the majority of the papers. There is one postcard dated 1944 and a letter dated 1953. The rest is dated 1950 and consists mainly of fan letters regarding her book. Also included in the collection is a book jacket from her book High Time to Tell It as well as clippings and a few photographs.

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Fritz London papers, 1922-2008, bulk 1926-1954 7.6 Linear Feet — 3,500 items

Fritz London, physicist and theoretical chemist, formulated the London equations of superconductivity with his brother, Heinz London. After fleeing Nazi Germany in 1933, London held appointments at Oxford and Paris, then at Duke University from 1939 to 1954. He specialized in low temperature physics and quantum chemistry, and authored Superfluids (1950) and numerous articles. The Fritz London Papers include correspondence, notes, manuscripts, reprints, and other materials, with bulk dates 1926-1954. The more than 300 correspondents include Walter Heitler, F.A. Lindemann, Max von Laue, Wolfgang Pauli, Michael Polyani, Erwin Schrödinger, Enrico Fermi, Edward Teller, and other noted scientists. Other materials include galleys and drafts of Superfluids, lab notebooks, course materials, notes, bound reprints. Materials acquired after London's death include interviews with Edith London; memorials; copies of correspondence held in other repositories; selected publications and interview transcripts; and indexes to London's scientific correspondence. English and German.

The Fritz London Papers include correspondence, notes, manuscripts, reprints, and other materials, with bulk dates 1926-1954. The more than 300 correspondents include Walter Heitler, F.A. Lindemann, Max von Laue, Wolfgang Pauli, Michael Polyani, Erwin Schrödinger, Enrico Fermi, Edward Teller, and other noted scientists. Major subjects include chemistry and theoretical physics, the Nazi regime and its effects on German scientists and academics, and London's emigration from Germany. Other materials include galleys and drafts of Superfluids, 30 lab notebooks, course materials, notes, bound reprints, and a manuscript on the significance of quantum theory for chemistry. Materials acquired after London's death include interviews with Mrs. London; memorials; copies of correspondence held in other repositories; indexes to London's scientific correspondence prepared by Kostas Gavroglou; a bound volume of notes written out by London from lectures given by Prof. Arnold Sommerfeld (1868-1951) at the University of Munich.

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Daniel Livingstone Papers, 1950-2001 36 Linear Feet

Daniel A. Livingstone is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Biology at Duke University, with longstanding research interests in biology, limnology, paleolimnology, zoology, and other subjects. The Daniel A. Livingstone papers include the extensive correspondence of Dr. Livingstone from the 1980s to 2001 as well as other materials related to his research and teaching at Duke University.

The Daniel A. Livinstone papers consist primarily of the extensive correspondence of Daniel Livingstone with scientists and colleagues related to his research interests in biology, limnology, paleolimnology, and other subjects. Other materials are related to his work on a variety of research grants, classes taught at Duke University, and other topics.

This collection has not yet been processed.

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Donna Lisker papers, 1999-2014 4.5 Linear Feet — 525 Megabytes

Donna Lisker was the head of the Women's Center and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education at Duke University in the 2000s and 2010s. The Donna Lisker Papers include materials on the development of the Baldwin Scholars Program, Lisker's service on the Women's Initiative and the President's Council on the Status of Women, retreats for women alumni of Duke, student housing, and other topics.

The Donna Lisker Papers include materials from Lisker's work with the Baldwin Scholars Program, on the Steering Committee of the Women's Initiative, and as Associate Vice-Provost for Undergraduate Education. Topics covered include planning and development of the Baldwin Scholars Program, particularly in correspondence with Jean O'Barr, research and reports from the Women's Initiative and follow-up committees, Lisker's work with Alumni Affairs, planning of Central Campus/New Campus, retreats for and outreach to women alumni, curriculum and budget planning for the Baldwin Scholars Program, and other subjects. Included are correspondence, reports, research, budget documents, and other materials.

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John L. Lievsay papers, 1937 - 1989 4.5 Linear Feet — 4500 Items

John L. Lievsay was an educator, author, and noted authority on Italian Renaissance literature. He was a Professor Emeritus of English at Duke University from 1962-1975. The collection includes correspondence with students, publishers, administrators, and faculty. Major subjects include all aspects of Renaissance scholarship, Lievsay's career as a professor of English, and his involvement with the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. English.

The collection includes correspondence with students, publishers, administrators, and faculty. Major subjects include all aspects of Renaissance scholarship, Lievsay's career as a professor of English, and his involvement with the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

An index to the correspondence file is included in the collection file. The index gives the name of each correspondent, an identifying description, and dates of correspondence. Please consult University Archives staff.

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Harry L. Levy papers, circa 1934 - 1980 3 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Harry L. Levy (1906-1981) served as a professor and dean of students at Hunter College, dean and vice-chancellor of the City University of New York, professor of the humanities at Fordham University, and visiting professor of classical studies at Duke University. Levy wrote several books and numerous articles; he specialized in the Roman poet Claudian, and authored major works on Ovid and Lucian. Papers include correspondence, subject files, articles, and reprints written and collected by Harry L. Levy, relating to his research in classical studies, and his roles as a professor and administrator. English.

Papers include correspondence, subject files, articles, and reprints written and collected by Harry L. Levy, relating to his research in classical studies, and his roles as a professor and administrator.

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Bruce Lawrence Papers, 1980-2009 3.0 Linear Feet

Bruce Lawrence is a professor in the Department of Religion and the founding director of the Duke Islamic Studies Center (DISC). The Bruce Lawrence papers include materials related to the founding of DISC as well as other programs and projects related to Islam and Middle East Studies both at Duke and elsewhere.

The collection includes materials related to the work of Bruce Lawrence at Duke University, particularly related to the development and work of the Duke Islamic Studies Center (DISC). Topics covered include Duke centers and programs related to Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies; work in and relationships with the country of Morocco, including cultural and arts festivals, a partnership between Duke University and Mohammed V University, and a Duke-in-Morocco program, some of which includes correspondence with Angier Biddle Duke; international seminars and programs (including some in partnership with the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies, especially in Morocco); grant and funding applications (including several from the Pew Charitable Trusts); Islamic art and architecture; history of religions; South East Asia; and other topics. Materials include notes, correspondence, conference programs and flyers, news clippings, and research materials, among others.

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William Thomas Laprade papers, 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975) 40 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

William Thomas Laprade was Professor of History at Trinity College (now Duke University) from 1909 to 1953 and Chair of the Department of History from 1938 to 1952. Papers contain personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Major subjects include William Thomas Laprade, history of Trinity College, Trinity College Press, Duke University Press, Duke University Department of History, Duke University libraries, The South Atlantic Quarterly, the American Association of University Professors, study and teaching of European history, American Historical Association, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, Kiwanis Club of Durham, and Phi Beta Kappa. Major subjects of correspondence include family life, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional activities of William Thomas Laprade, educator, historian, editor, and civic leader in the Duke University community. Papers include correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters. Materials include research and manuscript materials for books on 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, as well as a letter from Anthony Eyre to his brother-in-law, Sir John Newton, English mathematician and astronomer (1660). Correspondence concerns professional interests, Laprade's family, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. A complete alphabetical index to named persons in this collection, including correspondence, can be found in Box 16. The oversize box contains materials from the Laprade collection that were formerly housed in the map cabinets and the General Oversize collection. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Personal and Laprade family letters are concerned with family and local news, health, church meetings, grain production at the family mill in Rivermont, Va., the 1908 presidential election, and Laprade's father's voting machine invention. From about 1902 to 1904, Laprade participated in a large network of correspondence centered in the Weekly Courier-Journal newspaper of Louisville, Ky. Students wrote in, under pseudonyms, to discuss their ideals and problems. Other correspondence subjects include the effects of World War I and World War II on the Laprade family.

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John Tate Lanning papers, 1926-1976 36 Linear Feet

John Tate Lanning (1902-1976) was a historian, colonial Latin America scholar, and Duke University Professor of History. This collection includes correspondence, manuscript materials, committee notes, student papers, newsletters, conference materials, curriculum materials, travel diaries, interview transcriptions, and field research notes. Major subjects include the Duke University Department of History, Duke University Research Council, Hispanic American Historical Review, Latin American library resources, student and teaching of Latin American history, research in the social sciences, and Latin American colleges and universities. English.

Contains personal and professional papers relating to John Tate Lanning's career as an educator, historian, and scholar of Latin American history. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscript materials, committee notes, student papers, newsletters, conference materials, curriculum materials, travel diaries, interview transcripts, and field research notes. Includes materials pertaining to Lanning's editorship of the Hispanic-American Historical Review, interactions with the journal's managing editors, Duke University's Research Council, and the Lanning family. Also contains a diary Lanning kept during a research trip in England, Spain, and France, 1926 October-1927 May. Materials range in date from 1926-1976.

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Creighton Lacy papers, 1952-1988 1 Linear Foot — 1000 Items

Creighton Lacy has seved as a professor at Duke University Divinity School since 1953. The collection contains correspondence, reports, sermons, directories, memoranda, printed matter and clippings.

The collection contains correspondence, reports, sermons, directories, memoranda, printed matter and clippings. The papers include programs for the annual Symposium on Christian Missions sponsored by the Divinity school and its Missions Committee. There are several folders on Duke alumni who were active in the missions of the Methodist and other churches, particularly those in the Far East. Also included are manuscripts, memoranda, and clippings concerning the Nixon Library controversy of 1981, a civil rights sit-in at Watts Grill in Chapel Hill in 1964 and clippings and newspapers about student unrest at Duke and other campuses between 1968-1970.

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Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

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Wladyslaw W. Kulski papers, 1933-1987 7 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Wladyslaw W. Kulski was born in Warsaw, Poland on July 27, 1903. After earning his doctorate, Dr. Kulski served as diplomat and an educator. He taught Political Science at Duke University from 1964 until his retirement in 1973. He died May 16, 1989. Materials include correspondence, pamphlets, manuscripts, course notes, notebooks, photographs, printed matter and a scrapbook. The collection ranges in date from 1710-1987 and is in English, Polish, French and German.

Contains correspondence, diplomatic papers, conference papers, articles, printed matter and other materials related to Dr. Kulski's role as a Polish diplomat before and during World War II and as a lecturer and teacher of Political Science after the war. The materials, approximately half of which are in Polish, pertain to Slavic Studies, Soviet politics and government, and issues in European diplomacy and politics before, during and after World War II. The collection includes hand- and typed-written manuscripts in Polish, English, French and German and materials by and about his brother, Julian E. (1905-1988), including a memoir of Stefan Starzynski, mayor of Warsaw. Also included is the correspondence of Antonina Kulski, largely in Polish with a few in English and French. Her letters that largely cover the Kulski's time in London during World War II and consists of communication with Polish soldiers, namely Kazimierz Domaszewski and Bohdan Brzozowski. There are also some photographs of presumably Polish soldiers during World War II and likely Kulksi family members and friends. There is also a scrapbook of clippings and correspondence. Material ranges in date from 1710-1987, with the bulk covering 1933-1969.

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Paul Jackson Kramer papers, 1856 - 1994 (bulk 1927-1974) 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

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Claudia Koonz papers, 1992-1999 0.5 Linear Feet

Claudia Koonz is an emeritus professor of history at Duke University, whose research has focused on Nazi Germany and on ethnic hatreds and fears. The Claudia Koonz papers include some records related to the Refugee Action Project and a proposed center for research on human security.

The Claudia Koonz papers include some records related to the Refugee Action Project and a proposed center for research on human security. The collection includes correspondence, reports, emails, and other materials.

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Peter H. Klopfer papers, 1957-1980s 58.5 Linear Feet

Peter Klopfer is a Professor in the Department of Biology (previously known as Zoology). This collection contains ledger books and information relating to grants and research proposals, ranging in date from 1957-1971.

Contains materials from the many grants Professor Klopfer received to fund his animal-behavior research. Included are ledger books, correspondence, research and grant paperwork, including applications. The collection ranges in date from 1957-1971.

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William Klenz papers, 1944-1965 2.0 Linear Feet

William Klenz was an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Aesthetics, Art, and Music from 1947-1966. Collection contains sheet music and an unpublished manuscript by William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960. A later addition from Klenz's mentee and collaborator, Geoffrey Simon, contains manuscripts for Pacem in Terris, a cantata for mixed voices and organ (dated 1965), as well as an original performing score for Toccata ("Carillon"), dedicated to Simon (dated 1959 and 1962).

The collection consists of manuscript music and sheet music composed by Klenz, as well as supporting materials for some of the performances and some background information and a personal characterization of Klenz. The unpublished manuscript of William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960, was donated to the Archives by a former student of Klenz.

The 2021 accession contains two additional manuscripts: first, Pacem in Terris, cantata for mixed voices and organ. Texts for Pacem in Terris were selected by Klenz from biblical and rabbinical texts cited by Rabbi Everett Gendler in his The Revolutionary Truism (The Saturday Review, February 13, 1965). The first performance of Pacem in Terris was conducted by Geoffrey Simon at American University (Washington, DC) on November 21, 1965. The material consists of the original manuscript, including an additional Intermezzo not in first manuscript; also contains one performing copy from premiere; one copy (scored in Sibelius) from a later performance; and one copy of program from the premiere.

Also donated in 2021 was an original performing score (copy of manuscript) of Toccata ("Carillon"), for organ, V-19-1959. This score was dedicated to the donor (see final page with Klenz signature, date, and "for G.S."). Its first performance was in Berlin, Germany, at the Neutempelhof Kirche on August 18, 1962.

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Charles E. Jordan papers, 1942 - 1966 28.5 Linear Feet

Charles E. Jordan (1901-1974) served Duke as Assistant Secretary from 1925 to 1941, as Secretary from 1941 to 1957, as Chairman of the Athletic council from 1949 to 1963, and as Vice President for University Relations from 1946 to 1966. He was also active in community organizations, including the Durham County and North Carolina Boards of Education and various Methodist Church organizations. Jordan retired from Duke in 1966. The collection includes correspondence, subject files, audiotape, and other records relating to administrative and athletic matters at Duke University. Major subjects include scholarships, public relations, intercollegiate athletics (NCAA, ACC, Southern Conference, Duke Athletic Council, and Duke Athletic Association), the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program, the Woman's College, and university publications. There are also materials relating to the proceedings of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church and to educational matters in Durham and North Carolina. English.

The collection includes correspondence, subject files, audiotape, and other records relating to administrative and athletic matters at Duke University. Major subjects include scholarships, public relations, intercollegiate athletics (NCAA, ACC, Southern Conference, Duke Athletic Council, and Duke Athletic Association), the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program, the Woman's College, and university publications. There are also materials relating to the proceedings of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church and to educational matters in Durham and North Carolina.