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Collection

Wladyslaw W. Kulski papers, 1933-1987 7 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Wladyslaw W. Kulski was born in Warsaw, Poland on July 27, 1903. After earning his doctorate, Dr. Kulski served as diplomat and an educator. He taught Political Science at Duke University from 1964 until his retirement in 1973. He died May 16, 1989. Materials include correspondence, pamphlets, manuscripts, course notes, notebooks, photographs, printed matter and a scrapbook. The collection ranges in date from 1710-1987 and is in English, Polish, French and German.

Contains correspondence, diplomatic papers, conference papers, articles, printed matter and other materials related to Dr. Kulski's role as a Polish diplomat before and during World War II and as a lecturer and teacher of Political Science after the war. The materials, approximately half of which are in Polish, pertain to Slavic Studies, Soviet politics and government, and issues in European diplomacy and politics before, during and after World War II. The collection includes hand- and typed-written manuscripts in Polish, English, French and German and materials by and about his brother, Julian E. (1905-1988), including a memoir of Stefan Starzynski, mayor of Warsaw. Also included is the correspondence of Antonina Kulski, largely in Polish with a few in English and French. Her letters that largely cover the Kulski's time in London during World War II and consists of communication with Polish soldiers, namely Kazimierz Domaszewski and Bohdan Brzozowski. There are also some photographs of presumably Polish soldiers during World War II and likely Kulksi family members and friends. There is also a scrapbook of clippings and correspondence. Material ranges in date from 1710-1987, with the bulk covering 1933-1969.

Collection
William Thomas Laprade was Professor of History at Trinity College (now Duke University) from 1909 to 1953 and Chair of the Department of History from 1938 to 1952. Papers contain personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Major subjects include William Thomas Laprade, history of Trinity College, Trinity College Press, Duke University Press, Duke University Department of History, Duke University libraries, The South Atlantic Quarterly, the American Association of University Professors, study and teaching of European history, American Historical Association, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, Kiwanis Club of Durham, and Phi Beta Kappa. Major subjects of correspondence include family life, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional activities of William Thomas Laprade, educator, historian, editor, and civic leader in the Duke University community. Papers include correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters. Materials include research and manuscript materials for books on 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, as well as a letter from Anthony Eyre to his brother-in-law, Sir John Newton, English mathematician and astronomer (1660). Correspondence concerns professional interests, Laprade's family, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. A complete alphabetical index to named persons in this collection, including correspondence, can be found in Box 16. The oversize box contains materials from the Laprade collection that were formerly housed in the map cabinets and the General Oversize collection. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Personal and Laprade family letters are concerned with family and local news, health, church meetings, grain production at the family mill in Rivermont, Va., the 1908 presidential election, and Laprade's father's voting machine invention. From about 1902 to 1904, Laprade participated in a large network of correspondence centered in the Weekly Courier-Journal newspaper of Louisville, Ky. Students wrote in, under pseudonyms, to discuss their ideals and problems. Other correspondence subjects include the effects of World War I and World War II on the Laprade family.

Collection
William Gannaway was a Professor of Latin and History at Trinity College in Randolph County from 1857 until his retirement in 1892. The collection includes account books and grade books as well as a small amount of correspondence and notes. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

The collection largely includes grade books and account books. These consist of personal account books (Gannaway, like many other teachers, was also a working farmer) and college account books. They have not been separated. The is a report to the Trustees from 1864 as well as miscellaneous memoranda, receipts, financial records and notes, and a small amount of correspondence, including a letter from E. F. Finch in 1888 that concerns the financial affairs of Charles Heitman and their effects on Trinity College. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

Collection

William Stern papers, 1937-1938, undated 4 Linear Feet — 10 Items

William Stern was a psychologist and philosopher. He came to Duke as Visiting Professor in 1934. He remained until his death in 1938. The collection includes volumes compiled by Stern and his wife Clara Stern (1878-1945) in his psychological studies, correspondence with Eugen Berchtold, as well as a two-volume dissertation by a German student on Stern's philosophy. The material is in German.

The collection includes volumes compiled by Stern and his wife Clara Stern (1878-1945) in his psychological studies, correspondence with Eugen Berchtold, as well as a two-volume dissertation by a German student on Stern's philosophy. The material is in German.

Collection

William McDougall papers, 1892 - 1982 9.5 Linear Feet — 10000 Items

William McDougall (1871-1938), an early twentieth century psychologist, taught at Duke University from 1927 to 1938. McDougall espoused a hormic theory of psychology, emphasizing genetics and instinct over nurture. McDougall was also a strong proponent of parapsychology. The William McDougall Papers, 1892-1982, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, notebooks, photographs, diaries, drawings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Major subjects include Lamarckian experiments conducted by McDougall, the McDougall family (and sons Kenneth and Angus in particular), the study of parapsychology, the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University, the Psychology Department at Duke University, and anthropological studies in Borneo and the Torres Strait. English.

The William McDougall Papers date from 1892 to 1982, and contain McDougall's own papers as well as those of his family and other researchers. The collection is organized into three series. The first series, Professional, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the late 1920s to the late 1930s, the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Of particular note is his correspondence with other scholars in the fields of psychology and the social sciences. A card file which indexes these correspondents is available with the collection. McDougall's notes from his Lamarckian experiments on rats can also be found here, as can photograph albums from his anthropological travels in the late 1890s. The Family series contains correspondence, notebooks, photographs, clippings, writings, research and education materials, diaries, drawings, and other materials. Many materials belonging to two of McDougall's sons, Kenneth and Angus, are filed here. The third series, Other Researchers, contains writings and correspondence written by other researchers about McDougall or about McDougall's influence on psychology. These materials were not directly related to or owned by McDougall; most were generated after his death.

Collection
William Klenz was an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Aesthetics, Art, and Music from 1947-1966. Collection contains sheet music and an unpublished manuscript by William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960. A later addition from Klenz's mentee and collaborator, Geoffrey Simon, contains manuscripts for Pacem in Terris, a cantata for mixed voices and organ (dated 1965), as well as an original performing score for Toccata ("Carillon"), dedicated to Simon (dated 1959 and 1962).

The collection consists of manuscript music and sheet music composed by Klenz, as well as supporting materials for some of the performances and some background information and a personal characterization of Klenz. The unpublished manuscript of William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960, was donated to the Archives by a former student of Klenz.

The 2021 accession contains two additional manuscripts: first, Pacem in Terris, cantata for mixed voices and organ. Texts for Pacem in Terris were selected by Klenz from biblical and rabbinical texts cited by Rabbi Everett Gendler in his The Revolutionary Truism (The Saturday Review, February 13, 1965). The first performance of Pacem in Terris was conducted by Geoffrey Simon at American University (Washington, DC) on November 21, 1965. The material consists of the original manuscript, including an additional Intermezzo not in first manuscript; also contains one performing copy from premiere; one copy (scored in Sibelius) from a later performance; and one copy of program from the premiere.

Also donated in 2021 was an original performing score (copy of manuscript) of Toccata ("Carillon"), for organ, V-19-1959. This score was dedicated to the donor (see final page with Klenz signature, date, and "for G.S."). Its first performance was in Berlin, Germany, at the Neutempelhof Kirche on August 18, 1962.

Collection

William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

Collection
William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

Collection

William Hays Simpson papers, 1915-1938 0.5 Linear Feet — 100 Items

William Hays Simpson was a Professor of Political Science at Duke University from 1930 until 1974. His collection includes material concerning credits in North Carolina, which was one of Professor Simpson's research interests. Also includes reports, clippings, and correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1915-1938.

Contains material concerning credits in North Carolina, which was one of Professor Simpson's research interests. Also includes reports, clippings, and correspondence. The collection ranges in date from 1915-1938.

Collection

William Edward Whitford papers, 1955-1966 0.5 Linear Feet — 12 Items

A Duke University Alum, William Edward Whitford eventually became manager of Duke's Physical Plant Operations and Maintenance. His collection includes bound date books from the years 1955-66.

Contains 12 of Whitford's date books from the years 1955 to 1966. Date books include entries for personal, social and cultural events, many of which took place at Duke.

Collection
William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner's academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner's involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner's academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

Collection

W. H. Pegram papers, 1876 - 1928 1.75 Linear Feet — 1700 Items

William Howell Pegram (1846-1928) was a student, professor, and administrator at Trinity College (N.C.). He moved with the school from Randolph County to Durham County (N.C.), and remained active as Trinity College evolved into Duke University. The W.H. Pegram Papers include correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material. His relationship with Braxton Craven, both professionally and personally, is detailed. Among the subjects in the collection are Pegram's main academic interest, chemistry, and the administration of Trinity College in both Randolph and Durham counties. English.

The W. H. Pegram Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material related to Pegram's career at Trinity College and later Duke University. The first series, Personal, is a brief series containing clippings and other material regarding Pegram's career and his death in 1928. The second series Correspondence, contains letters to and from Pegram, mainly regarding administrative issues at Trinity College. There are also some letters of thanks from former students. This series is arranged chronologically. The third series is Notebooks, and contains notebooks used by Pegram for a variety of purposes: to record the attendance and grades of his students, to prepare Sunday school lessons, to work on chemistry problems, and to write essays. The notebooks are arranged by title or subject, when available, then date. The fourth series, Writings, contains several essays prepared by Pegram, as well as shorter pieces. This series is also organized by title, when available, and then date. The last series, Trinity College, contains a variety of materials related to the history of the school. These materials are not all directly related to Pegram, but they provide a historical context for his other materials. It contains clippings, articles, financial papers, and print materials about the school. These papers are organized alphabetically.

Collection

Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

Collection

W. D. Davies papers, 1911-2007 106.5 Linear Feet — 78 containers

W. D. (William David) Davies (1911-2001) was Professor of Biblical Theology at Duke University Divinity School from 1950 to 1955 and from 1966 to 1981 was George Washington Ivey Professor of Advanced Studies and Research in Christian Origins. The collection features correspondence, course materials, writings, subject files, sermon notes, books, and research notes of W. D. Davies. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The collection includes correspondence, research materials, teaching materials, photographs, and books. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The first series, containing multiple accessions, includes correspondence, manuscript materials, article reprints, student papers, lecture notes, course reading materials, sermon notes, student notebooks relating to courses taken at the University of Wales Memorial College in Brecon, general research subject files, research notes relating to teaching at Duke University, Columbia University, Princeton University, Union Theological Seminary, and Texas Christian University.

Accession UA2014-0065 contains personal and professional correspondence, scholarly materials and books from Davies' personal library. The collection also contains materials related to Davies' Feschrift, an honor celebrating Davies'contributions to the field of biblical theology.

Collection

W. Bryan Bolich papers, 1891-1972 5 Linear Feet — 5,000 Items

W. Bryan Bolich (1896-1977) served as a Professor of Law at Duke University from 1927 to 1966. Papers contain family memorabilia, general correspondence, photographs, an oral history, diaries, course notes, writings, drafts of statutes revisions, and clippings. Major subjects include family work at Southern Railway in Forsyth County, N.C., Duke Law School curriculum development and reorganization, Law Day, the Rhodes Scholarship, Trinity College Class of 1917 alumni activities, Law School Alumni Association, North Carolina House of Representatives, and property and alien rights laws authored with the North Carolina General Statute Commission.

Correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, diaries, certificates, correspondence and drafts of laws, miscellaneous memorabilia from Bolich's career as a Professor at Duke University Law School, student notebooks from courses taken at Trinity College and University of Oxford, and a taped memoir and 19-page transcription. Family materials include materials from Southern Railway and much correspondence between Bolich's parents during their courtship (ca 1891-1893). Political correspondence between Bolich and Richard Nixon is filed in Series 3 (Correspondence. Political).

Collection

W. A. Stumpf papers, circa 1947-1955 3 Linear Feet — approx. 2,000 Items

W. A. Stumpf was Professor of Education at Duke University from 1948 until his retirement in 1968. The collection contains surveys of high school seniors (circa 1955) from Durham, Guilford and Wake County high schools, in addition to a manuscript draft and mimeographed copies of papers relating to a 1950 civil rights case against Washington County (N.C.) schools. The material ranges in date from circa 1947-1955.

The collection includes 3-page survey forms completed by approximately 500 seniors in Durham, Guilford and Wake County high schools, circa 1955. The survey was titled "Plans of High School Seniors," and included questions about their families' economic status and educational background, living conditions, current activities and post-graduation plans. The forms are arranged by county, then school and sex, then numerically by an apparent score or value penciled on the form. Additionally, the collection contains a typed draft manuscript of a work, mimeographed copies of a proposal to offer the Ed.D. at Duke and mimeographed copies of papers relating to Wilmer Wilborne, et al vs. H. P. Taylor, et al, a civil rights suit against Washington County (N.C.) schools which include a copy of "A Report on a Comparison and the Program and Facilities of Instruction in the Negro and White Schools of Durham," by John W. Carr, Jr. (Professor of Education at Duke) and other material on Durham schools, along with a report on Arlington County (V.A.) high schools. The material ranges in date from circa 1947-1955.

Not all of the surveys have a penciled value or score on them. Since the purpose of the value or score is unknown, surveys with values or scores may fall under FERPA rules as protected information. As such, access to those surveys may be prohibited.

Collection

Walter S. "Jack" Persons papers, 1937-2001 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Walter Scott "Jack" Persons served as swimming coach at Duke University from 1930 to 1979, and as Duke's lacrosse coach from 1949 to 1966. He was inducted into the Duke Sports Hall of Fame in 1986. Collection includes correspondence, programs, clippings, and photographs related to Jack Persons; the Duke University Physical Education Dept., swim team, and lacrosse team; and the Duke Sports Hall of Fame. Materials range in date from 1937 to 2001.

The materials include letters, greeting cards, invitations, programs, newspaper clippings, accolades, and photographs. The materials cover Persons's tenure as coach of both the Duke Swim team and the Duke Lacrosse team, as well as his election to and membership in the Duke Sports Hall of Fame.

Collection

Walter Gordy papers, 1935 - 1986 37.5 Linear Feet — 29,000 Items

Walter Gordy (1909-1985) was a James B. Duke Professor of Physics at Duke University. In his over thirty year career at Duke, he founded and directed the Duke Microwave Laboratory, and researched and published extensively. The Walter Gordy Papers include correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. Major subjects include microwave spectroscopy, microwave radar, the Duke Microwave Laboratory, Army research Office , Durham (ARO-D), and the Duke Department of Physics. English.

The collection includes correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. The materials date from approximately 1935 to 1986. Gordy's professional career, particularly his work at Duke, is well represented. Much of the material stems from his research in the Duke Microwave Laboratory. The correspondence in the collection is mainly professional. A few materials, such as trip souvenirs, represent Gordy's personal life.

Collection

Waldo Beach papers, 1949-1986 0.7 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Waldo Beach was a professor of Christian Ethics in the Duke University Divinity School between the years 1946-1986. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, typescripts and printed material concerning civil rights, politics and other ethical issues and ranges in date from 1949-1986.

Collection includes correspondence, memoranda, typescripts and printed material primarily concerning ethics. Major subjects include civil rights and research in politics and ethics. Individual files include a proposal to the Danforth Foundation to improve teaching, correspondence concerning residential development in Duke Forest, conferences on Human Values and Public Policy, and cooperative research in the areas of politics and ethics. Items of note include a copy of an undated typescript, "A President Named Jimmy", by James D. Barber, a pamphlet produced by the Durham Community Planning Council titled "Durham's Assets in the Arts", and first-hand accounts of the January 3, 1964 sit-in in Chapel Hill. The collection ranges in date from 1949-1986.

Collection
Virginia Bryan was Assistant Dean of the Woman's College and a botanist. The collection includes correspondence, notes, field notebooks, article reprints, and other materials related to Virgnina Bryan's work as a botanist.

The collection includes correspondence, notes, field notebooks, article reprints, and other materials related to Virgnina Bryan's work as a botanist.