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John Buettner-Janusch Letters and Clippings, 1979-1992 and undated 0.25 Linear Feet

John Buettner-Janusch was a professor at Duke University in the 1960s who was convicted of manufacturing illegal drugs in his New York University laboratory in the 1970s and of sending poisoned candy to a New York judge and another Duke professor in 1987.

The John Buettner-Janusch Papers consist of letters written by Buettner-Janusch while in prison, primarily from 1987-1992, as well as clippings on his chargings and convictions. Several letters are addressed to "Annie and Will", although many letters are missing the first page or are not addressed, and many are undated. Most are handwritten. Many of the letters relate stories of Buettner-Janusch's research trips to Madagascar. Also included are clippings that detail accusations against him related to the manufacture of illegal drugs at NYU as well as the poisoned candy sent to Judge Brieant in 1987, and his obituary from the New York Times in 1992.

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Mel Shimm Papers, 1954-1990 3.0 Linear Feet

Mel Shimm was a professor of law and Associate Dean at the Duke Law School. The Mel Shimm papers include materials from Mel Shimm's time as a faculty member at Duke Law School. Included are class materials such as exams and readings, correspondence, committee materials, and other materials.

The Mel Shimm papers include materials from Mel Shimm's time as a faculty member at Duke Law School. Included are class materials such as exams and readings, correspondence, committee materials, and other materials.

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Frances D. Acomb papers, 1953 - 1975 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Frances D. Acomb (1907-1984) served as a professor of history at Duke University from 1945 to 1975. She specialized in French history. The Acomb papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan; as well as the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors, the American Association of University Women, and other professional organizations. English.

The papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of modern European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan. Acomb's memberships in the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors and the American Association of University Women are documented through minutes and other materials.

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John W. Alspaugh papers, 1875 - 1898 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

John Wesley Alspaugh was a lawyer, editor, and civic leader in Winston-Salem, N.C. A key supporter of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C), he served as chairman of the Board of Trustees and as a member of the Committee of Management, which ran the school from 1884 to 1887. Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management. English.

The John W. Alspaugh Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management.

The letters of the other two members of the Committee of Management, Julian S. Carr and James A. Gray, concern the finances of Trinity during the critical struggle for the institution's survival, when many pledges to an endowment fund were unpaid. Notes signed by the Committee of Management had to be met, speakers approved, scholarships considered, teachers employed, insurance paid, meetings arranged, and reports prepared, among other business.

In 1886, the question of employing Dr. John B. Bobbitt as collection agent for Trinity was debated. The quest for funds was hampered by the impossibility of collecting a loan to Charles L. Heitman. Meanwhile, the executor of the estate of Braxton Craven was pressing for settlement of debts owed by the college.

With the arrival of President John Franklin Crowell in 1887, the Alspaugh correspondence diminishes, although he remained as chairman of the Board of Trustees for many years. Still haunting the Trustees was the debt against Mrs. Craven for the college bells. John B. Bobbitt was trying to secure payment for his services as a collector of notes pledged to Trinity. In 1889, S. L. Leary of Charlotte, N.C. offered his services as an architect for the new buildings needed when the college considered moving to Raleigh, N.C.

Two broadsides, dated 1884 and 1886, contain reports of the Committee of Management of Trinity College. Also included is the annual report made by Chairman of the Faculty William H. Pegram to the President and Board of Trustees of Trinity College.

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863-1961 13.25 Linear Feet

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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Katharine M. Banham papers, 1910-1995 26 Linear Feet — 20,000 Items

Katharine May Banham (1897-1995) served as a professor in the Department of Psychology at Duke University from 1946 to 1967, specializing in child psychology and development. Papers include correspondence, writings, speeches, case files and research notes, teaching materials, diaries, memorabilia, photographs, and oral history interviews of Katharine M. Banham, relating to her work in the field of psychology and her contributions to Duke University, Durham, and North Carolina. Prominent subjects include psychological experimentation, child psychology, geriatrics and gerontology, human social and emotional development, children with cerebral palsy, the Woman's College, Duke Preschool, Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, the North Carolina Psychological Association, the Durham Child Guidance Clinic, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. English.

The Katharine May Banham Papers span the years between 1910 and 1995, with the bulk occurring between 1945 and 1984. These papers include her master's theses and dissertation work, professional and academic writings, case files, and data documenting psychological experiments that culminated in the development of tests, as well as research articles and one monograph; transcripts of talks and addresses; translations of French psychological texts, teaching materials; administrative records of and records documenting her role in various civic and academic clubs and organizations; professional and personal correspondence; and personal materials including art, photographs, memorabilia, poetry and other personal writings, diaries, biographical information, legal documents, and tapes and transcripts of an oral history interview done in 1980. The main subject areas include Banham's contribution to the profession, her participation in the Duke community, and the Durham community as well as regional, national, and international communities and agencies.

The collection chiefly reflects Banham's career as a woman psychologist during a period when there was little support for women in professional or academic careers. The papers document Banham's research and teaching in three countries; her contributions in the areas of child psychology and geriatrics, particularly human social and emotional development; functioning and development of children with cerebral palsy and disabilities; the history and especially the development of psychological testing of children and adults; and parapsychological phenomena. Research and teaching materials are located within the Academic and Professional Psychology series and Duke Activities series. Materials relevant to Banham's professional development are scattered throughout all five series.

The collection is also important for the perspective it offers on the Duke University Psychology Department and the Woman's College during the 1940s to the 1960s. Information related to both as well as her role in the Admissions and scholarships Committees among other faculty committees (see the folder list located in the description of Duke Activities series), the Duke Preschool, the Duke Film Society, and the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement can be found primarily in the Duke Activities series. Material regarding the development and teaching of an infant and child psychology curriculum and a series of correspondence with graduate students are also of special interest and can be found in the Duke Activities series. Other materials relating to her contributions to the Duke Community are located in the Academic and Professional Psychology series, the Correspondence series, and the Personal Files series.

Banham's contribution to the city of Durham is reflected in the Agency and Club Participation series with the most in depth materials relating to her role in establishing the French Club, the Photographic Arts Society, the Altrusa Club, and the Committee for Successful Aging (which became the Golden Age Society and finally, the Coordinating Council for Senior Citizens), and, to a lesser degree, in the Academic and Professional Psychology series specifically in her role as one of the founding psychologists of the Durham Child Guidance Clinic. Banham co-founded the North Carolina Psychological Association in addition to being an active member and officer of other regional, national, and international organizations such as the League of Women Voters, the American Association of University Women, and the International Council of Women Psychologists.

Banham's life was defined by her professional and academic commitments and so her closest relationships were with her colleagues and the many individuals to whom she gave her time and the benefit of her professional skills. The Correspondence and personal series best reflect her tireless efforts on behalf of the people with whom she come into contact. Her papers are particularly useful as they document the period of the 1920s through the 1960s in England, Canada, and especially the United States from the perspective of a highly educated, professional woman.

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James David Barber Scrapbook, 1939-1996 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 Item

James David Barber was a Political Science professor at Duke from 1972-1995. The scrapbook includes news clippings, correspondence, family photographs and childhood memories from the years roughly 1939-1996.

Entitled "My Life," the scrapbook contains nine sections: My Main Vita, My Books, Professors Blessing Me, My Early Life, My Teaching, My Work to Help Duke University, My Coming Forth for Politics, Some Things I Have Done for Humans, and Pictures. It reflects Professor Barber's work as an educator, author and activist. A substantial portion of the scrapbook contains letters from Barber's former students at Duke. In these letters, the students evaluated Barber's courses in political science. Also included are typescripts of Barber's "What Duke Can Be" and "Duke's Constitution," letters to Barber upon his retirement from Duke and family pictures.

This scrapbook is a xerox copy made by James David Barber in 1996 (includes color scans). The original remains with his family.

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John Spencer Bassett collection, 1802 - 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) 1 Linear Foot — 250 Items

John Spencer Bassett, a professor in the History Department of Trinity College from 1893-1906, was a renowned educator and advocate of freedom of expression. A native of North Carolina, Bassett received his A.B. from Trinity College in 1888 and his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University in 1894. He returned to Trinity College to teach and was active in teaching, writing and collecting southern Americana. Bassett began publication of an annual series of Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society; founded the honorary society 9019, a precursor to Phi Beta Kappa; founded and edited the scholarly journal, the South Atlantic Quarterly; and encouraged his students to publish and fostered their interests in Southern history. In 1903, Bassett published an article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy in the South Atlantic Quarterly, that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. Bassett's views brought on a controversy that became known as the Bassett Affair that helped to establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States. The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. English.

The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. The correspondence (1893-1917) includes a copy of a 1911 letter to Charles Frances Adams in which Bassett gives his account of the Bassett Affair. Other correspondents include Oswald G. Villard, William Kenneth Boyd, Edwin Mims, and William E. Dodd. Much of the original correspondence concerns affairs of the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association. Clippings ([1802]-1896) include articles about North Carolina politics, Civil War history, the Bassett Affair, Trinity College matters, race relations, the media, and education. The manuscripts include the autobiography of Jessie Lewellin Bassett, wife of John Spencer Bassett, in which she describes her life from 1866 until her marriage to Bassett in 1892; a copy of the paper, "How to Collect and Preserve Historical Material," that Bassett presented to the State Historical Association on Oct. 23, 1900; and John L. Woodward's Ph.B. thesis, "Causes and Progress of the Revolutionary Movement in North Carolina," (1894).

The bulk of John Spencer Bassett's personal papers can be found in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress.

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Paull Franklin Baum papers, 1928-1989 0.2 Linear Feet — 125 Items

Dr. Paull F. Baum was a James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University from 1922 until his retirement in 1955. He was an internationally famed scholar in the field of medieval and Victorian studies and was considered an authority in the principles of English versification and the works of Chaucer, Rossetti, Tennyson and Matthew Arnold. The collection includes correspondence, a manuscript, clippings, research material and book reviews by or to Dr. Baum. It ranges in date from 1928-1989.

Contains correspondence, a manuscript, clippings, research material and book reviews by or to Dr. Baum. The correspondence includes two letters from Mrs. Helen Rossetti Angeli, daughter of William M. Rossetti, and Archibald Henderson. The latter's letter is in response to Baum's review of his biography of George Bernard Shaw. Henderson makes an interesting statement about Shaw's opposition to much that he included in the biography, especially two chapters which Shaw tried unsuccessfully to persuade Henderson to leave out of the book. Dates range from 1928-1989.

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Charles A. Baylis papers, 1924-1973 4.5 Linear Feet — 3600 Items

Charles A. Baylis was a professor of philosophy at Duke University from 1952-1970. This collection contains the correspondence, writings, personal papers, and departmental records. The material ranges in date from 1924-1973, bulk from 1950-1970.

This collection is organized into two series, correspondence and personal papers, and covers the years from 1924 to 1973. The bulk of the material is personal correspondence between Baylis and colleagues at other universities. Other material includes papers relating to groups and organizations that Baylis belonged to, course exams and syllabi, and essays he wrote. Notable in this collection is Baylis' Masters Thesis (1924) and a tenure case involving a colleague at the University of Washington (1948).