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A private journal kept by me... of a voyage to... the West Indies to New York and Cape Ann, 1865 Feb. 21-1889 Feb. 23

0.1 Linear Feet
Thomas C. McCollom was a resident of Cambridge, Mass., b. May 9, 1847. Collection comprises the journal (104 pgs.) McCollom maintained daily while voyaging to and from the West Indies, Feb 21-May 18, 1865, when he was between the ages of 17 and 18. The ship was the schooner D. L. Sturgis; with five crew members and its captain, Daniel Deasy. It appears McCollom undertook the journey for the improvement of his health, and the majority of his entries detailed the depression, homesickness, and boredom he experienced during the trip, "I can't tell why but I feel homesick and blue. I have such days now quite often though not so often as formerly. I shan't be sorry to get home I know. I don't know what to do with myself when I feel so. I find that writing home or in this journal is about as good a cure as anything. I feel better to express my feeling somehow if only to write them down here (pp. 25-26)." McCollom also described crew members' activities (including one man's drowning after an accident, p. 5), the weather and wind patterns, the difficulties of the Atlantic Ocean crossing and vagaries of the Caribbean Sea, and any birds and animals seen. He also identified any ships encountered, usually with their nationality, destination, and any cargo being transported.

Collection comprises the journal (104 pgs.) McCollom maintained daily while voyaging to and from the West Indies, Feb 21-May 18, 1865, when he was between the ages of 17 and 18. The ship was the schooner D. L. Sturgis; with five crew members and its captain, Daniel Deasy. It appears McCollom undertook the journey for the improvement of his health, and the majority of his entries detailed the depression, homesickness, and boredom he experienced during the trip, "I can't tell why but I feel homesick and blue. I have such days now quite often though not so often as formerly. I shan't be sorry to get home I know. I don't know what to do with myself when I feel so. I find that writing home or in this journal is about as good a cure as anything. I feel better to express my feeling somehow if only to write them down here (pp. 25-26)." McCollom also described crew members' activities (including one man's drowning after an accident, p. 5), the weather and wind patterns, the difficulties of the Atlantic Ocean crossing and vagaries of the Caribbean Sea, and any birds and animals seen. He also identified any ships encountered, usually with their nationality, destination, and any cargo being transported.

Other common topics included his attitudes regarding race and the inhabitants of each island; activity on the wharf and ship while in port, especially sales and purchases made; his excursions on each island, particularly for church services; and his growing participation as part of the crew, by writing up of invoices and bills, noting the loading of cargo, and eventually assisting with sails and repair of the ship. McCollom also mentioned his desire to hear about the end of the Civil War, and recorded his opinions about ships sailing under the Rebel flag (p. 59), Lincoln's death (p. 91), and the capture of Jefferson Davis (p. 97). The main ports the ship visited included "Kinston" (Kingston), Jamaica; Georgetown, Grand Cayman Island; and "Rattan" Island, Honduras. Other areas visited or mentioned at length included Port Royal, Jamaica; Utila Island; and New York City, where McCollom considered the highlights of his trip to be touring Central Park and listening to a sermon by Henry Ward Beecher. The item's final entry, dated Feb. 23, 1889, contained McCollom's comment after rediscovering the journal twenty-four years after the voyage.

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Leah Dyjak photographs, 2014-2018

1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 color inkjet prints — 16 x 20 inches
Collection comprises twenty-five 16x20 inch color inkjet prints from a body of work titled "New Beach" by artist Leah Dyjak. The images, taken by Dyjak on the Atlantic coast, show ocean and sand encroaching on and destroying human-made barriers and boundaries - roads, jetties, and groins - with people looking on, stretching out, and strolling the beaches, evoking the nature of human existence at the liminal boundaries of water and land. This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Environmental Change. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from a body of work titled "New Beach" by artist Leah Dyjak. The images, taken by Dyjak on the Atlantic coast, show ocean and sand encroaching on and destroying human-made barriers and boundaries - roads, jetties, and groins - as people look on, stretch out, or stroll on the beach, evoking the nature of existence at the liminal boundaries of water and land.

From the artist's statement: "Conceivably, the ocean contains all time and all places, with the coastline delineating where the understood meets the unfathomable. It acts as a boundary, the line between where we walk and where we float. Standing at the edge is a way to become physically close to our point of origin — geologically, biologically, metaphysically. It is the terra incognita of the modern world. With every crash of a wave, the line of the coast as we know it changes; our data becomes obsolete instantaneously. Water changes state, weather changes everything."

The prints measure 16x20 inches and are all horizontally oriented. This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Environmental Change. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Leah Dyjak photographs, 2014-2018 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 color inkjet prints — 16 x 20 inches

artist Leah Dyjak. The images, taken by Dyjak on the Atlantic coast, show ocean and sand encroaching on
Dyjak on the Atlantic coast, show ocean and sand encroaching on and destroying human-made barriers and
Atlantic Coast (U.S.) -- Photographs

Doris Thompson journal and log book of voyage aboard the S.S. Tetela, 1935 Mar. 25-Jun. 5

Online
0.2 Linear Feet — 1 v.
"Stewardess" aboard the ship; resident of Grimsby[?], England Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

All the entries in the piece indicate that Thompson was an experienced sailor and had navigational training, "Started work this morning. The ship's Log Book had been filled up last trip, and they couldn't get a new one at Rotterdam, so the entries for the last few days had been made on odd sheets of paper. I re-wrote these on official paper and.... Continued making all entries during the trip (pgs. 1-2)." The Tetela sailed from Southampton and arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica, a fortnight later. Over the next week, the ship took on a large cargo of bananas at Montego Bay, Bowden, and Kingston, where five passengers joined the ship for the homeward voyage. The ship birthed at Garston Docks, Liverpool, two weeks later. In the journal, Thompson does not record what duties she carried out as stewardess. Instead, she recorded weather, passing ships, as well as sea life, but mainly focused on describing, with an active sense of humor, staff activities, meals, gossip, recreation, and teasing aboard ship. She also detailed a day trip she took to Port Antonio, the loading of bananas as cargo, as well as her contacts with officials of the United Fruit Company and family members of the ship's staff. The photographs document much of her description, but include several images of Thompson taken by the Tetela's captain.

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Mary Gorham Paine Diary, 1879-1884 and undated

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 Item
Mary Gorham Paine (b. 1843) of Yarmouth, Massachusetts, was married to Eben W. Paine (1835-1904) of Brewster, Massachusetts, a merchant ship captain in the trade between Boston and Zanzibar. They had one son, Allan Thatcher Paine (b. 1882). The collection consists of a single diary kept by Mary Gorham Paine as she traveled twice by ship from Boston to islands near Madagascar. Forty-six manuscript pages provide both a day-by-day account of her trip aboard the Sarah Hobart to Nossi-Be (present day Nosy Be) from December 25, 1879 to May 4, 1880, and a three-page, mid-journey synopsis of the passage with her young son to Reunion Island, begun on December 13, 1883. As is made clear by the text, the intent of both voyages was to join her husband who was probably located in Zanzibar at the time. Newspaper clippings chiefly concerned with literary topics, news and issues relating to Africa, and obituaries for her husband and others are pasted into 18 pages following the narrative portion of the diary together with a photograph of a man and another of a baby, most likely her husband and son. The diary as a whole provides some insight into the life of a sea captain's wife and a description of long-distance ocean travel aboard a barque such as the Sarah Hobart.

The collection consists of a single diary kept by Mary Gorham Paine as she traveled twice by ship from Boston to islands near Madagascar. Forty-six manuscript pages provide both a day-by-day account of her trip aboard the Sarah Hobart to Nossi-Be (present day Nosy Be) from December 25, 1879 to May 4, 1880, and a three-page, mid-journey synopsis of the passage with her young son, Allan, to Reunion Island, begun on December 13, 1883. As is made clear by the text, the intent of both voyages was to join her husband, Captain Eben W. Paine, who was probably located in Zanzibar at the time. Newspaper clippings chiefly concerned with literary topics, news and issues relating to Africa, and obituaries for her husband and others are pasted into 18 pages following the narrative portion of the diary together with a photograph of a man and another of a baby, most likely her husband and son. The clippings lack an indication of the year and source except for the "Literary Leaves" articles which are from the Boston Journal.

The diary provides some insight into the life of a sea captain's wife and a description of long-distance ocean travel aboard a barque such as the Sarah Hobart. Paine initially suffered from sea-sickness, but once recovered, occupied herself with sewing, reading, washing, and baking, as well as socializing and playing cards and Parcheesi with fellow travelers. She often mentioned the activities of her primary companions, Mrs. Crocker and the ship's Captain, who sometimes cooked special meals for his female passengers and was often engaged in washing clothing himself. In addition, Paine unfailingly commented on the weather, foods served at meals, number of miles traveled, number of days at sea, and types of ships sighted. On April 18th, after nearly four months at sea, the ship made port at Tamatave, Madagascar (present day Toamasina). Paine mentioned little about the six days spent ashore and continued with the diary only until arrival at Nossi-Be. The summary description of the second journey centers mainly on Paine's concern with her 20-month old son's well-being and activities aboard ship, her own struggle with sea-sickness and feelings of inadequacy in managing her son, and her appreciation for the assistance of Mrs. Hill and the ship's Captain in caring for him. The final update to the narrative was added on February 4th, 1884, while still en route to their first stop, Reunion Island.

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Atlantic Ocean -- Description and travel
Indian Ocean -- Description and travel
Ocean travel -- History -- 19th century

Picture File, 1700s-1970s and undated

50 Linear Feet
The Picture File was created by the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a vertical file from the 1950s to the 1980s. Images were separated from manuscript collections as well as added individually from other sources. The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries. The bulk of the images in the collection date from the early 1800s through the 1950s. Formats represented include black and white photographic prints; cartes de visite, cabinet cards and other albumen prints; tintypes and daguerreotypes; engravings and lithographs; political cartoons; watercolors; sketches; postcards; stereographs; souvenir albums; leaflets; and small broadsides. Organized into four main series: Subjects, Geographic, Socialist Party, and People. To allow for better housing, Negatives and Stereographs have been separated into their own series.

The images offer representations of the landscape, culture, and history of most of the southern United States, especially Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Many images of France, Italy, Germany, Japan, China, and some African countries can also be found; a large number of other countries and geographic locations are represented by only a few images. Many political figures and notable personages are portrayed, both in portrait and in caricature; there are especially significant numbers of images of Eugene Debs, Socialist Party leader, and members of the Duke family of Durham, N.C. The history of Durham is also well-represented, in addition to other Southern cities and towns, including Raleigh N.C.

Civil War images are abundant, offering views of battles and scenes of devastation both rural and urban. Other conflicts are also depicted, including the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, and there are some images from both World Wars. A significant group of items in the People Series pertains to African Americans, ranging from studio portraits to caricatures of individuals and groups of individuals; a smaller group of images features depictions of Native Americans. Finally, the Picture File is home to collections of many engravings and lithographs produced by the 19th century American companies Currier and Ives, L. Prang and Co., and Kurz and Allison; many of them commemorate military leaders or events.

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James Rogers papers, 1768-1794 and undated

Online
10 Linear Feet — Approximately 20,000 items (mostly photocopies)
Collection consists almost entirely of photocopies of documents held in the Public Records Office (London) originally belonging to James Rogers, Bristol, England, a merchant, ship owner, and slave trader who engaged in the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The material, dating from 1768-1794, largely consists of incoming correspondence, bills of sale, receipts, and other items related to ships' voyages and trading activities. Many of these voyages were for the purpose of acquiring and trading enslaved laborers from Africa. A paper guide to the collection created by the donor of the collection and available to researchers includes descriptions of most of the ships' voyages.

Collection consists of photocopies of documents originally belonging to James Rogers, Bristol, England, a merchant and ship owner active in the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

The material, dating from 1768 to 1794, largely consists of incoming correspondence, bills of sale, receipts, and other items related to ships' voyages and trading activities. The papers are arranged into three series: Ships' Voyages; Bills; and Business Papers and Letters. Much of the material in the collection concerns the African slave trade, but there is also information on the cotton, sugar, and fishing markets and trade. Documentation includes accounts for materials supplied to ships in which Rogers had an interest; accounts of ships, cargoes, and insurance; receipts for advances of wages to ships' crews; bills of exchange; petitions from Rogers' creditors; statements of shares in cargoes and ships; letters from ships' captains in Africa relating to purchases; comments on the state of the market; price information; letters from agents overseas; and other materials. One set of documents about the Mermaid contains commentary about an uprising of enslaved persons on board.

The collection also includes the same documents on twenty reels of microfilm, but the arrangement of the paper copies by topic and by date renders them easier to use. The original documents became the property of the Public Record Office, London, as exhibits in litigation that followed Rogers' declaration of bankruptcy in 1793, and are currently held in the Court of Bankruptcy records, indexed as B 3/4177 and B 3/4185, in the National Archives in Kew, England.

The folders in the Ships' Voyages Series are organized alphabetically by ship name, then within chronologically, with correspondence regarding the voyage first, followed by bills and other related items. The items in the Bills Series are arranged chronologically. The Business Papers and Letters are organized into two main subgroupings: by country of trade, and by name of correspondent; there are also smaller groups of miscellaneous correspondence, including Rogers' bankruptcy papers, which contain information on how the slave trade was organized, and speculations in the cotton market.

Place-names mentioned in these papers include: Green Island, N.Y.; Kennebec, Maine; many coastal towns in Newfoundland; Cove Island, Ontario; Belize; many locations in the Caribbean Islands; and coastal cities in England, Ireland, Portugal (including the Azores Islands), and Spain (including the Canary and Balearic Islands).

A ninety-page paper guide to the collection created by donor of the collection (Duke Economics Professor Simon Rottenberg) and available to the researcher includes descriptions of most of the ships' voyages.

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James Rogers papers, 1768-1794 and undated 10 Linear Feet — Approximately 20,000 items (mostly photocopies)

Online
Slave trade -- Atlantic Ocean Region -- History

John Tully photographs, 2014-2018

2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 30 prints — 11x17, 17x22 inches
Collection consists of thirty color inkjet prints from a body of work titled "Shifting Sands" by photographer John Tully. The images were taken at the North Carolina coast, and include natural areas such as beaches along the Outer Banks and coastal forests in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, and human environments such as coastal highways, piers, abandoned beachfront properties. There are also some portraits of people. The photographs are accompanied by captions written by the photographer and by the artist's statement. Together, photographs and text call out the environmental, economic, and social consequences brought on by natural changes as well as by human-created climate change. The prints measure 17x22 (20) and 11x17 (10) inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Environmental Change. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of thirty color inkjet prints from the body of work "Shifting Sands" by photographer John Tully. The images were taken on the North Carolina coast, and include natural areas such as beaches along the Outer Banks and coastal forests in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, and human-built environments such as sand-covered highways, piers and jetties, and abandoned beachfront properties. There are also some portraits of people.

Twenty prints measure 17x22 inches and ten are sized 11x17 inches. The photographs are accompanied by captions written by the photographer and by the artist's statement on the project. This work received the 2018 Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Environmental Change.

From the artist's statement: "The work in this project documents effects of rising sea levels on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Already unstable sand bars that naturally shift and migrate, climate change is exacerbating existing issues and revealing new ones, forcing residents to grapple with the impacts of a changing landscape."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Container
Box 1, Image RL.11694-P-0023
dunes act as a natural barrier between homes and the unforgiving Atlantic. In 2010, state officials said
the ocean could rise 39 inches,all but eliminating the Outer Banks. The announcement sparked heated

A network of sand dunes spans the Cape Hatteras National Seashore in Frisco, North Carolina. The dunes act as a natural barrier between homes and the unforgiving Atlantic. In 2010, state officials said the ocean could rise 39 inches,all but eliminating the Outer Banks. The announcement sparked heated debate between real estate industry and environmentalists.

Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2020

Online
28.5 Linear Feet — 38 boxes; 1 oversize folder — 785.5 Gigabytes
The Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Art degree program at Duke University has been awarded since 2013. Collection houses MFA/EDA theses submitted by graduates of the program, in the form of typescripts; handmade books; digital video and audio, three-dimensional artwork; photobooks; photographic prints; digital still images; and film of multi-media performances. Subjects range widely: U.S. and Southern cultures; world cultures; street photography; childhood; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; women and spirituality; and abstract constructs. Other places documented include China, Vietnam, and the Middle East. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written Theses and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints in varying sizes; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Artifacts are sometimes part of the project, including one large magic lantern apparatus.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, segregation, and identity; and abstract constructs. Most projects are based in the United States, but some are centered on Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian or Chinese history and culture.

Most authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; therefore this archive represents the graduates of the MFA EDA program who submitted their work for inclusion.

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File
Box 17
the Bahama Islands via the Atlantic Slave Trade and the ocean. Both suffered a substantial "taming" in

This collection of 3D-printed sculptural work embodies the parity between the Africans displaced to the Bahama Islands via the Atlantic Slave Trade and the ocean. Both suffered a substantial "taming" in the name of slavery, and again at the dawn of the plantation's offspring: tourism.

Marion Belanger photographs, 2001-2012

2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints
Collection comprises 25 black-and-white and 48 color photographs taken from 2001 to 2012 by Marion Belanger, documenting the intersection of natural and human-built environments. Belanger's series "Everglades," taken in Florida between 2001-2004, presents images of wildlife and natural landscapes affected by the impacts of tourism, agriculture, migrant worker housing, construction, and activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army. Her portfolio "Rift/Fault," shot between 2006-2012, documents zones in California and Iceland where the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift exist - visibly or invisibly - alongside human environments; subjects in this series include housing developments, monitoring stations, geologic features and landscapes, coastal roads, and geothermal structures such as greenhouses. The digital inkjet prints in both series measure 13 or 13 1/2 x16 inches. Both projects were published as photobooks (2009 and 2012, respectively). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 25 black-and-white and 48 color photographs taken from 2001 to 2012 by Marion Belanger, documenting the intersection of natural and human-built environments.

Belanger's series "Everglades," taken in Florida between 2001-2004, presents black-and-white images of wildlife and natural landscapes affected by the impacts of tourism, agriculture, migrant worker housing, construction, and activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army. This series was also published in 2009 as Everglades: Outside and Within.

Her portfolio "Rift/Fault," shot between 2006-2012, documents zones in California and Iceland where the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift exist - visibly or invisibly - alongside human environments; subjects in this series include housing developments, monitoring stations, geologic features and landscapes, coastal roads, and geothermal structures such as greenhouses. The images were shot in color and are suffused with pale tonalities. Prints measure 13 1/2 x16 inches. Also published as a photobook in 2012, available in the library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Folder

Rift / Fault, 2006-2012 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 48 color inkjet prints — All prints are signed by the photographer and measure 16 1/2 x 13 inches, with images measuring 13 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches.

American Plate meets the Eurasian Plate, along the Mid-Atlantic Rift in Iceland. Fault refers to the San
our earth, underneath our oceans, our land, our homes. Tectonic plate edges are geologically active

These 48 images were taken between 2006 and 2012 in dramatic geological zones in California and Iceland, and, as in Belanger's previous project on the Everglades, she focuses attention on the dual relationship of landscapes and their impact on humans, and humans and their impact on the environment.

From the artist's statement: "Rift/Fault is a study of the shifting land-based tectonic edges of the North American Continental Plate in California and Iceland. Rift refers to where the North American Plate meets the Eurasian Plate, along the Mid-Atlantic Rift in Iceland. Fault refers to the San Andreas Fault, where the North American and Pacific Plates meet. Tectonic plates slide along the mantle of our earth, underneath our oceans, our land, our homes. Tectonic plate edges are geologically active - they spread, move, erupt, and tremble. Their behavior is for the most part unpredictable, and wholly uncontainable. And while boundaries upon the land are often contested, politicized, and fought over, tectonic plate edges remain immune to any human efforts of control. I photographed the visual traces (or not) of the tectonic plate edges upon the land, as well the structures and uses of the built landscape upon those edges, allowing for dialogue between the wild and the contained, the fertile and the barren, the geologic and the human. These dichotomies create a visual tension that questions the uneasy relationship between geologic force, and the limits of human intervention."

The full artist's statement is available in the portfolio box.

Titles and dates are transcribed as they appear on the print versos.

Alexander Russell Webb Journals, 1892

0.2 Linear Feet — 3 Items

The collection contains Webb's "Journal No. 1, From Manila to Calcutta" (142 pp.), Aug. 29-Oct. 19, 1892, and his "Journal No. 2, From Calcutta to Bombay and Agra" (144 pp.), Oct. 20-Dec. 15, 1892. This is the first journal that Webb ever wrote (Vol. 1, p. 1). His journal continued beyond Vol. 2; the last sentence was continued elsewhere, and no pages appear to be missing from this volume. A later volume or volumes contained the account of the rest of his journey which is incomplete here.

Webb's descriptive style is good, and he did extensive touring wherever he went. Thus, his volumes are good travel journals. The most important feature of his account is his contact with Muslim scholars, re-ligious leaders, businessmen, rulers, ordi-nary people, etc. Beginning in Rangoon, he and his mission to spread Islam in America were enthusiastically received not only by individuals but literally by throngs of well-wishers. He was received by many influential Muslims, and his comments about some of them are quite interesting. Webb did not like the English or local people who catered to them, and this attitude, often expressed, colored his reactions to persons whom he met. Some of the significant Muslims whom he discussed have been identified by using S. M. Ikram's Modern Muslim India and the Birth of Pakistan (Lahore, 1977). Spellings of names are given as Webb wrote them unless they are found written otherwise in Ikram's book or other reference sources.

Webb's journals record the following travels in 1892: Vol. 1: Manila, Aug. 29-Sept. 6 (pp. 1-10); ocean travel, Sept. 6-13 (9-23); Singapore, Sept. 14-21 (24-64); ocean travel, Sept. 21-28 (64-80) with a visit at Penang, Sept. 23-25 (66-74); Rangoon, Burma, Sept. 28-Oct. 9 (80-113); ocean travel, Oct. 9-12 (113-122); Calcutta Oct. 12-19 (122-142); Vol. 2: Calcutta, Oct. 20-23 (pp. 1-11); Patna, Oct. 23-24 (11-15); Benares, Oct. 25-26 (15-19); Bombay, Oct. 28-Nov. 17 (21-54); Poona, Nov. 17-19 (56-62); Hyderabad, Nov. 20-Dec. 8 (65-120); Madras, Dec. 10-12 (127-140); and Agra, Dec. 15 (143-144). Travel inside India was by train, of which Webb gave some interesting descriptions.

The item is a printed program for a horse race given by the Sultan of Johore at Singapore on Sept. 15, 1892.

A Xerox copy of Journals 1 and 2, on acid-free paper, is filed with the collection. Further photocopying should be done from these copies, not from the original volumes.

Description from the Manuscript Card Catalog located in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

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Collection

Alexander Russell Webb Journals, 1892 0.2 Linear Feet — 3 Items

(Princeton, 1961), pp. 536-538; and V. S. Naipaul, An Islamic Journey, Among the Believers, The Atlantic
); ocean travel, Sept. 6-13 (9-23); Singapore, Sept. 14-21 (24-64); ocean travel, Sept. 21-28 (64-80) with
a visit at Penang, Sept. 23-25 (66-74); Rangoon, Burma, Sept. 28-Oct. 9 (80-113); ocean travel, Oct

John Buck Diary, 1887 August 10-September 25

0.5 Linear Feet — 4 Items
John Buck was an American, most likely a resident of the New York metropolitan area. The collection consists of a diary in four volumes that chronicles the vacation in Great Britain of a young American named John Buck from August 10 to September 25, 1887. The volumes comprise 249 handwritten pages in total, with commercial prints, menus, receipts, and theater playbills attached to the back of selected pages. The script is elaborate, but legible, and the narrative is remarkably descriptive. Humorous sketches illustrate the first volume in particular and the third volume includes three photographs of the author. The diary provides a detailed account of Buck's voyage on the R.M.S. Britannic and his time in London, where he spent the majority of his vacation socializing and attending the theater. Buck also stayed in Edinburgh, Scotland, with Henry Irving, the famous actor and manager of the Lyceum Theatre, and with the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort at Badminton House.

The collection consists of a diary in four volumes that chronicles the vacation in Great Britain of a young American named John Buck from August 10 to September 25, 1887. The volumes comprise 249 handwritten pages in total, with commercial prints, menus, receipts, and theater playbills attached to the back of selected pages. The script is elaborate, but legible, and the narrative is remarkably descriptive. Humorous sketches illustrate the first volume in particular and the third volume includes three photographs of the author.

Buck began his diary, which he entitled "Eight Weeks Vacation and How I spent it," with a detailed account of the people and activities on board the R.M.S. Britannic while on route from New York City to Liverpool, England. Upon landing, he traveled to London, where he spent the majority of his vacation. Although he visited tourist destinations such as London Tower and Winsor Castle, Buck professed little interest in sightseeing and clearly preferred the social life, including attending dinner parties, meeting pretty young women, playing sports such as pool, baseball, and tennis, and above all, attending and discussing the theater. Initially, Buck socialized with an actor he met aboard the Britannic, W. A. Faversham, and the noted basso profundo, Franz Vetta, whom he met in London. From August 30 to September 4, Buck stayed in Edinburgh, Scotland, as the guest of Henry Irving, the famous actor and manager of the Lyceum Theatre. He spent these days in the company of Mr. Irving, Bram Stoker, the actress Ellen Terry, and her son, Teddy Craig. Buck frequently noted Mr. Irving's thoughtfulness and recounted their activities and conversations, including one humorous anecdote about Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. From September 5 to September 9, Buck stayed with the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort at Badminton House. Buck described the house and grounds, formal dinner parties, informal breakfasts, sporting activities, and sightseeing excursions to Gloucester Cathedral and Raglan Castle. The remainder of the vacation was spent in London, much as it began, visiting acquaintances and going to the theater until September 20 when he departed for Liverpool and the return voyage on the Britannic. Buck ceased recording events mid-Atlantic due to his sudden interest in a female passenger.

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Collection

John Buck Diary, 1887 August 10-September 25 0.5 Linear Feet — 4 Items

Liverpool and the return voyage on the Britannic. Buck ceased recording events mid-Atlantic due to his
Ocean travel -- History -- 19th century

Charles Wilkes papers, 1816-1876

7 Linear Feet — 4,566 items
U.S. naval officer and explorer, of Washington, D.C. Family correspondence, chiefly relating to naval cruises of Wilkes and his son, John Wilkes; the U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842, to Antarctica, the Pacific Islands, and the Northwest Coast of the U.S., including preliminary planning, the voyage itself with detailed descriptions of places visited, and publishing the results; gold mining and milling in North Carolina; the Civil War; and Wilkes family business ventures in North Carolina; together with legal and financial papers, writings, printed material, clippings, and other papers. Includes correspondence, 1848-1849, with James Renwick (1792-1863) and others.

The largest section in this collection is the correspondence, 1816-1876. It covers such subjects as the naval cruises of Charles Wilkes and his son, John; the Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842, in terms of preliminary planning, the voyage itself and detailed descriptions of places visited, and publishing the results of the expedition; gold mining and milling in North Carolina; the Civil War; and Wilkes family business ventures in North Carolina. There are many letters written by prominent persons, including a particularly rich section containing letters of scientists in 1848 and 1849. Also there is a lengthy series of James Renwick (1792-1863) and Charles Wilkes correspondence. Other groups of papers are the clippings, financial papers, legal papers, miscellany, printed material, writings, and volumes.

The correspondence covers a sixty-year span, 1816-1876, with the majority of the letters being addressed to Charles Wilkes. The letters commence with one from John Wilkes about obtaining a warrant as a midshipman for his son Charles. Most of the early letters to 1818 are those of John to Charles concerning the son's early naval career and the father's advice pertaining to it.

In the 1820s begin letters from Charles Wilkes while on naval voyages, 1822-1823, describing Rio de Janeiro; Valparaiso; and the earthquake, burial customs, and clothing in Peru. The bulk of the letters for this period fall in 1825, while Wilkes was in Washington, D. C., waiting to take a naval examination for promotion to lieutenant. His letters concern social occasions, visiting friends, and prominent personages, including President and Mrs. John Quincy Adams and a dinner they gave, Mrs. Calhoun, and Prince Achille Napoleon Murat. Wilkes evidently made a conscious effort to contact and get to know the "right" people, pertly to further his career. Other Wilkes letters refer to the court-martial of Commodore Charles Stewart, at which Wilkes was called to testify; two French generals in Washington, Generals Lafayette and Simon Bernard; and steamboat and stagecoach travel.

Letters to Wilkes in 1825 and 1826 relate news about the trade situation in Chile, Simon Bolivar, politics and government in Peru, and U. S. Navy commissions. A lengthy series of James Renwick (1792-1863) letters begins in 1828 and continues to 1854. Renwick was an engineer and educator, professor of natural philosophy and chemistry at Columbia, and an authority in every branch of engineering of his day. The letters, which were written primarily to Wilkes and to Jane Wilkes, Renwick's sister, relate to scientific and family matters Letters of Renwick's sons, Henry and Edward, eminent engineers, and James (1818-1895), a noted architect also appear in the papers.

In 1828 and 1829 letters begin in reference to preliminary plans for an exploring expedition. Particularly, Captain Thomas Ap Catesby Jones wrote a lengthy letter on Jan. 2, 1829, about the proposed expedition. President Jackson had given him command of the exploring squadron but later eased him out of command. On May 7 Wilkes wrote to Secretary of Navy John Branch about instruments and charts for the planned expedition.

In the 1820s there begin series of letters among Wilkes family members that continue in varying degrees throughout the collection. Those included in addition to Charles are his brothers John ("Jack''), who resided on a plantation outside Charleston; Henry, a lawyer in New York; and Edmund, also a lawyer in New York; and a sister Eliza (Wilkes) Henry in Albany, N. Y. There is an extended correspondence between Charles and his wife Jane, which runs from 1825 to 1848.

From July, 1830, to May, 1831, Charles Wilkes was on an extended Mediterranean cruise. As a result the collection for this period contains many lengthy letters he wrote to his wife that are replete with detailed descriptions of such locations as Gibraltar, Port Mahon, Algiers, Tunis, Naples, Florence, and Marseilles. In particular there is an expecially good account in September, 1830, of a visit Wilkes made to meet the Bey of Tunis and the prime minister at the palace. Also there is information about the French expedition to Algiers and the reaction to the French troops. Wilkes also demonstrated his interest in cultural and social life through his careful descriptions in Oct., 1830, of the National Museum, the San Carlo Opera, and churches in Naples. He also participated in much social life while visiting France in Dec., 1830.

The letters for 1832 and 1833 fill only a portion of one folder. Of note is a letter, July 28, 1833, by Charles Wilkes's brother John about the South Carolina militia, states rights, Governor Hayne, and politics in South Carolina

A long series of letters from Henry Wilkes in New York to his brother Charles in Washington, D C., appears from 1834 through the 1840s. The topics are primarily business and financial matters, sale and management of property, rental houses, and the Jackson City Association. Henry also wrote concerning elections in New York, riots there, and his attitude toward blacks. Of additional interest are letters in Dec., 1834, one that Charles Wilkes wrote to Secretary of the Navy Mahlon Dickerson about measurements of the eclipse, and one from James Renwick to Wilkes in reference to the U. S. Coast Survey.

By mid-1836, some correspondence begins to appear concerning preparations for the coming Exploring Expedition. For example, Wilkes wrote to John Boyle, Acting Secretary of the Navy, in July about instruments he needed for the voyage and requesting funds to purchase charts, books, and instruments. In August Wilkes journeyed to England and Europe to obtain scientific instruments for the expedition. In 1837 he wrote to Navy Secretary Dickerson about his dealings with Edward John Dent, a chronometer maker in London, and later about the disposition of instruments purchased for the expedition. Other letters in 1838 discuss the organization of the expedition, who will command it, speculation as to whether or not Wilkes will go, and plans and preparations for staffing and equipment. On June 3, 1838, Mary Somerville, an English scientific writer and astronomer, wrote to Wilkec about various aspects of oceanography which were still possible topics for inquiry on an exploring expedition. In the last half of 1837 are letters about Wilkes's surveying efforts and a report by Mrs. Wilkes on a visit from Dolley Madison.

From August, 1838, to June, 1842, Charles Wilkes was the commander of the U. S. Exploring Expedition. Writing from the U. S. Ship Vincennes to his wife, his letters are generally lengthy and marvelously detailed. Although little information is included about the specifics of the scientific experiments and specimen gathering, there is a wealth of information about the people and places visited. It is possible to include in this sketch only the highlights of information in the letters. Please consult the subjects listed in this Guide for further information. In 1838 and 1839, the voyagers went to Madeira; Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; Callao, Peru; the Society Islands; and Sydney, Australia. Included is information about the homes, plants, and wine-making in Madeira; the President of Chile; travels to various small islands in the Pacific Ocean; natives; and social occasions. Also Wilkes referred to discipline problems on board ship, the officers in the squadron, the spirit of overall harmony on the expedition, and an apparent lack of support for the expedition by the U. S. government.

In 1840, Wilkes noted his sighting of the Antarctic Continent and then the trip to the Fiji Islands. This latter stop was particularly poignant for Wilkes because his nephew, Wilkes Henry, and a Lt. Underwood were murdered by natives who sometimes practiced cannibalism. The voyage was marred by several personnel problems. Wilkes suspended and sent home Dr. Gilchrist, a surgeon assigned to the expedition, and had difficulties with Joseph P. Couthuoy, a member of the scientific corps whom Wilkes dismissed. Wilkes's use of strict discipline was to result later in a court-martial.

In late 1840 and early 1841, the ships were docked in the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), where he wrote a detailed account of an adventurous trip to explore the volcanic mountain, Mauna Loa, and of missionaries in Hawaii, In May, 1841, he noted a stop in Oregon and the Columbia River.

Letters in 1842 concern Wilkes's promotion and court-martial. His name was omitted from the list of promotions in the Navy, and he was not promoted to commander until 1843. The court-martial charges were primarily the result of his supposed use of harsh discipline on the expedition. As mentioned previously he was sentenced to be publicly reprimanded.

There begins in the late 1830s and 1840s correspondence between Charles Wilkes and his children, and among the children, which will continue throughout the collection. The children with whom he communicated were John ("Jack") (1827-1908); Jane (1829-[18--?]); Edmund (1833-[18--?]), an engineer; and Eliza (1838-[18--?]). Other family letters include several from Anne de Ponthieu to her cousin Charles Wilkes in the 1830s, and a long series between Henry Wilkes and his sister-in-law Jane Wilkes in the 1840s.

The family correspondence for the remainder of the 1840s during the post Exploring Expedition period includes many letters of Henry Wilkes, brother of Charles, particularly in 1846 and 1847. They concern business and financial matters, coal property in Pennsylvania, and the sale of the Jackson City property.

During this period John Wilkes (1827-1908) wrote from the U.S.S. Mississippi, which was on a cruise to Pensacola, Vera Cruz, and other ports. Contained in his letters is a brief report of Slidell's mission to Mexico, Several of his letters are from Annapolis where John was a midshipman at the U. S. Naval Academy in early 1847. The others were written from the U. S. S. Albany, which he was on board for a surveying cruise to Mexico and the western coasts of Central and South America. While on the cruise in late 1847 and 1848, he wrote to his father descriptions of various stopping places such as the Island of St. Thomas, Curaçao, and Caracas, Venezuela. In 1848 John was appointed Acting Master of the Albany. The next year John's letters to his father consist of those he wrote while on board the U. S. S. Marion, and while attached to his father's Exploring Expedition publication work for which he traveled to Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D. C.

John's younger brother, Edmund, wrote several letters to his family while he was in school in Philadelphia in 1846 to 1847. The bulk of his letters during this period, though, date from August, 1848, through 1849, from Charlotte, N. C. As a teenager, Edmund was given the responsibility of going to Charlotte to oversee some mining and milling property there. This extensive correspondence consists basically of reports by Edmund to his father and instructions from Charles to his son; as a consequence, much information is revealed about mining and milling efforts in the Charlotte area at this time. Specifically Edmund gave accounts of grinding ore at the Charlotte and Capps Mines, Capps Mine preparations, comments about amalgamation problems, milling ore, and working stamp, grist, and saw mills at St. Catherine's Mills Charles Wilkes owned at least a one-quarter share of the Capps Gold Mine, and also had a share in a co-partnership for the mine called the Capps Company. It was his intention to obtain possession of the engine at the Capps Mine and to provide facilities for others to use it either for shares or by a tribute system. He also wished to make St. Catherine's Mills a business place for grinding all sorts of ores, but none of his ventures in Charlotte was ever very successful or profitable.

In the summer of 1848 Jane Wilkes, the wife of Charles, took a vacation in Newport, Rhode Island, a fashionable summer resort area. Her letters in July describe the people and activities there. Mrs. Wilkes had suffered a leg injury in June, which worsened over the summer. She died in August in Newport while her husband was on a trip to South Carolina and also to Charlotte to inspect family property.

As previously noted there is a series of James Renwick (1792-1863) letters in this collection. The correspondence is particularly heavy for the 1843 to 1849 period. The letters concern reviewing of the manuscript of the Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition and his calculations made from measurements made during magnetic observations on the expedition. Renwick also wrote about his attempt to be appointed to the U. S. Boundary Commission, which failed, and the beginning careers of his three cons.

The period, 1848 to 1849, is an especially rich one for this collection in terms of the correspondence of prominent persons it contains. From 1843 to 1861, Charles Wilkes was assigned to special service, chiefly in Washington, D, C., preparing for publication and publishing the information collected on the Exploring Expedition. Much of his correspondence during 1848 to 1849 deals with describing and cataloging the specimens, such as lichens, collected on the expedition; work on preparing charts; writing, editing, and publishing of volumes; and paying the bills for this work.

In the course of this work Wilkes received letters from many prominent scientists, naval officers, senators and congressmen, and statesmen. Please consult the "List of Selected Persons" in this Guide for an extensive listing of correspondents. Of particular interest are four series of letters: 1. Asa Gray, botanist, to Wilkes from 1849 to 1859, writing about work on the botany of the Exploring Expedition; 2. Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz, zoologist, corresponding to Wilkes from 1849 to 1861, concerning drawings of fish and echinoderm specimens from the expedition; 3. Joseph Henry, scientist and first director of the Smithsonian Institution, writing, 1849 to 1875, about loans of Exploring Expedition specimens; and 4. John R. Bartlett (1805-1886), state official and bibliographer, writing in 1849 about the sales of the Narrative and the publication of a spurious abridgment of the work. Other scientists who corresponded include Isaac Lea, James D. Dana (1813-1895), William D. Brackenridge, Titian Ramsay Peale, William S. Sullivant, and Edward Tuckerman.

The correspondence for the 1850s continues two important themes of the collection: the continuing work concerning the Exploring Expedition, and gold mining and milling in North Carolina. Throughout, there are letters referring to various aspects of the Exploring Expedition work, such as descriptions being made of specimens, appropriations and bills, as well as letters from many prominent scientists. Examples of such letters are Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz writing about the classification and drawings of fish specimens, Asa Gray about his work describing the botany of the expedition and William Sullivant's drawings of mosses, Spencer F. Baird about his report on the reptiles, William Sullivant about the engraving of drawings and publication of his work on mosses, and Charles Pickering about his report on the geographical distribution of plants and animals.

Many other prominent persons who were not scientists also corresponded with Wilkes during the 1850s, Of interest is a letter dated April 9, 1851, from President Millard Fillmore to Wilkes thanking him for sending a copy of his work on meteorology.

A very long series of letters between Charles Wilkes and his younger son Edmund continues from the 1840s through the 1850s, Most of the early letters concern the mills at St, Catherine's Mills near Charlotte, N. C.; financial matters; and the fact that the mills are not proving to be a very successful venture, In the summer of 1850, Edmund returned home and then in September began attending the Laurence Scientific School at Harvard to train to be an engineer, The remainder of his letters for this period primarily concern his work as an engineer on railroads in Ohio, particularly in Zanesville. His letters describe hits work, operations of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the many accidents on this railroad in 1858.

The very long series of letters from John to his father Charles Wilkes continues in 1850 until 1852 while John is on board the U.S.S. Marion on a cruise continuing to places such as Rio de Janeiro, China, and Manila Bay. He wrote very lengthy descriptive letters on this cruise. In the summer of 1852 he was working on the calculations for observations of the Exploring Expedition and also corresponded while on trips to Pennsylvania and Ohio.

The remainder of the correspondence of John Wilkes as well as that of some others pertains to mining and milling operations in the Charlotte area. In 1853 John went to North Carolina to be superintendent of the Capps mining operations and presumably to continue work begun by his brother Edmund earlier. John wrote about the condition of various mines, such as the Capps, McGinn, and Dunn mines; mining operations, such as pumping water out of the Capps mine shaft; his brief tenure as agent of the Capps Mining Company; problems with the Capps Company; and continual financial problems. By August, 1855, the Capps Mine was defunct. Charles Wilkes had been President of the St. Catherine's Mining Company. John also became involved in milling operations and sent back reports about the work, progress, and machinery repairs at the St. Catherine's Mills; stamp mills; flour and corn milling; and questions about Wilkes's ownership of St. Catherine's Mills. In 1858 John turned his attention to the Mecklenburg Flour Mills, which he purchased with William R. Myers. Other correspondence concerns a proposed St. Catherine Gold Mining Company, which would have been formed to sell a newly invented machine for reducing metallic ores.

There is considerably less bulk for the 1860s and 1870s than for earlier years, there being one box of material for each of these decades. Certain letters in 1860 begin to mention the possibility of secession. Throughout the Civil War period are references to various battles, ships, naval and army officers, and views on the war. On November 8, 1861, Charles Wilkes commanded that the British mail steamer Trent halt and be boarded. He then searched the vessel, arrested the Confederate commissioners James Mason and John Slidell, and removed them to the U.S. Ship San Jacinto. Wilkes's primary error was in searching a neutral vessel and seizing the agents on board, rather than bringing the ship into port. His actions became quite controversial both in the United States and in Europe. Although the British people were outraged by the events, a majority of Lincoln's cabinet applauded the act. The matter was finally resolved, though, when Secretary of State Seward released the prisoners, realizing that the alternative was war with England. Two letters in 1862, written by Michele Costi, a publicist living in Venice, address this affair. He wrote a strong defense of Wilkes's actions in the Trent affair. A copy of Costi's, In difesa del San Giacinto, is contained in the writings. There is no firsthand account by Wilkes of this affair in the collection.

In July and August, 1862, there is a series of letters from Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to Charles Wilkes, who was co landing the James River Flotilla at that time. Also in 1862 are various orders about ships, crews, and discharges, as well as letters concerning aspects of the U. S. Navy, such as health, medical care, surgeons, liquor, and deserters. Many of the letters in 1862 and 1863 comment on General George Brinton McClellan, particularly after his removal as commander-in-chief of the U. S. Army; the Wilkes family favored him. In late 1862 and early 1863 letters refer to the fact that Wilkes was passed over for promotion to rear admiral and to his reputation as an officer. His wife Mary had much correspondence attempting to secure the promotion. Wilkes was not promoted to rear admiral on the retired list until 1866. On June 1, 1863, he was detached from the West India Squadron and recalled home. Unfortunately his letters for this period at sea, 1861-1863, are not included in this collection. Only a handful of letters exist for 1864; two of them are from Wilkes to Gideon Welles concerning Wilkes's court-martial.

Family letters during the Civil War are concentrated mainly in 1862 and 1863, while Wilkes was at sea. His wife and two older daughters remained in Washington, D. C., and in their letters they discuss prominent citizens of the city, army generals, naval officers, and activities there. Many letters refer to business and financial matters.

At the conclusion of the Civil War, John Wilkes's letters from Charlotte to his father resume. John was at this time serving as the first president of the First National Bank of Charlotte and had resumed operations at the Mecklenburg Iron Works which he owned. His letters relate to business and economic conditions in North Carolina and the South during Reconstruction, making a start again after the Civil War, and business and financial matters. Wilkes was in a partnership that owned the Rock Island Manufacturing Company; letters refer to its financial problems. In about 1866, Charles Wilkes moved to Gaston County, North Carolina, where he had purchased the High Shoals Iron Works. He had a contract of sale, but no deed, so protracted legal battles ensued. The Iron Works continued to produce batches of pig iron and manufacture nails. Letters in the collection pertain to the Iron Works and its production. Only a few letters exist for 1868 and 1869.

The correspondence for the 1870s consists primarily of family letters, mostly written by John Wilkes to his father. Letters continue about the problems of the Rock Island Manufacturing Company, which had failed in about 1869. Other letters concern the Mecklenburg Iron Works, which was at one time called the Mecklenburg Foundry and Machine Shops, of which he was proprietor. He also referred to the continued question of ownership of the High Shoals Iron Works and the appropriation for the work of the Exploring Expedition in 1870. A few other letters were written by Mary and Edmund Wilkes, who went to live in Salt Lake City in 1871, but returned to New York later.

Other letters for the 1870s pertain to the Exploring Expedition. Charles Wilkes wrote to Lot M. Morrill about publishing the volumes of the work of the expedition. There are letters from Frederick D. Stuart, assistant to Wilkes, concerning funds to finish the publication of the Exploring Expedition volumes. It was difficult in the later years to obtain this funding from Congress.

The two clippings are a picture of Charles Wilkes and an article, 1862, concerning publication of the results of the Exploring Expedition.

The financial papers, 1830-1875, include such items as financial statements, Exploring Expedition statements, bills, receipts, cost estimate, and a bond.

In the legal papers, which span the years 1827-1865, are indentures, many of which are signed by Charles Wilkes and Richard B. Mason, among other parties. Also included are articles of association and other papers for the Jackson City Association, a signed approval by Secretary of the Navy Isaac Toucey of a summons to Wilkes for a trial, and undated plats. There are court documents, such as agreements, summons, a complaint, and a memorandum. Some of these items pertain to litigation concerning a Lynch vs. Wilkes family real estate dispute.

The miscellany consists of papers, 1825-1875. Exploring Expedition items include a memo in 1838 concerning the acting appointments as commanders of Charles Wilkes and William H. Hudson, magnetic measurements, and in 1858 a few items about revisions to various maps and publications of the expedition. Three depositions occur in this section in 1862 concerning fortifications at Drewry's Bluff. They are written by a deserter from the Confederate Navy, a former Confederate soldier, and a New York soldier who had been behind Confederate lines. Other Civil War papers in 1863 and 1864 relate to the court-martial of Wilkes.

The printed material spans the years 1849 to 1874. Included is a broadside that General John James Peck penned on September 20, 1864, entitled, "Siege of Suffolk-Chancellorsville." The purpose of the paper was to debunk the idea that any significant portion of Longstreet's army was transferred to Chancellorsville. In the printed material also is "Report on the High Shoals Property in Gaston County, North Carolina" by F. Winter. This is a proof of the pamphlet written in 1873 concerning the geology of High Shoals. Other titles are "Working the Gold Mines in New Granada," "Prospectus of the American Review, " and "Map of the City of Zanesville."

While the writings cover the two years, 1862 to 1863, most of them are undated. Included is a copy in Italian of "In difesa del San Giacinto," 1862, by Michele Costi. This was a defense of Wilkes's actions in the Trent affair. An English translation of this item was published as a pamphlet under the title, Memoir on the Trent Affair. A copy is housed in the Rare Book Room. Related items are "The Surrender of Mason and Slidell" written in Wilkes's hand and another article, both of which defend his actions in the Trent affair. Copies of "Naval Reform" and "Abuses in the Navy," 1862, are also included. Two folders contain the sixteen-chapter manuscript "Trip to the Far West" by Charles Wilkes in 1863. The narrative is comprised of descriptions of the localities visited, including Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Milwaukee, the Mississippi River, St. Paul, Iowa (especially Dubuque), St. Louis, Cincinnati, Erie, New York--Buffalo and Niagara Falls, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York City. "Canal Trip in Peru" is listed as being included with the manuscript but is not a part of this collection. Other undated writings describe various aspects of New York City, iron-clad vessels, New Jersey, and Baltimore.

The volumes, 1823-1847, include account books of Charles Wilkes, a notebook owned by Edmund Wilkes, and "Notes related to Fejee [sic] Islands." There is an account book for the ship O'Cain, 1823, maintained while Wilkes was on a trip to ports in the South Atlantic on a sealing voyage. Wilkes was in command of the ship, which was fitted out by its owner, Mr. Winship. Other financial records of Charles Wilkes are in three Daybooks of Receipts and Expenses, 1828-1829, 1829-1832, and 1833-1835. Edmund Wilkes kept the notebook in 1847 while he was a student in Philadelphia. Evidently it was from a chemistry course. Charles Wilkes wrote "Notes related to Fejee [sic] Islands" from July 15 to August 7, 1840, while on the Exploring Expedition.

Two oversize items are in oversize storage: "Map of the World shewing [sic] the Extent and Direction of the Wind and the Route To Be Followed in a Circumnavigation of the Globe" by Charles Wilkes, 1856, and a broadside, including a plat of several lots of Charles Wilkes's land in Washington, D. C. for sale, May 12, 1874.

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Collection

Charles Wilkes papers, 1816-1876 7 Linear Feet — 4,566 items

, maintained while Wilkes was on a trip to ports in the South Atlantic on a sealing voyage. Wilkes was in
its chief fields of exploration the islands of the Pacific Ocean, the coast of the Antarctic Continent
small islands in the Pacific Ocean; natives; and social occasions. Also Wilkes referred to discipline

Bates Worldwide, Inc. records, 1934-2005 and undated

784 Linear Feet — 5.1 Gigabytes — Audiovisual objects in RL00090-SET-0001 are not included because they require Audiovisual processing before access!! — 336,000 Items
Bates Worldwide advertising agency (Bates) was established in 1940 by former executives of the Benton & Bowles agency. It grew to become one of the largest agencies in the U.S. until its demise in 2003. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by the Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century. The Bates Worldwide, Inc. Records spans the years 1934-2003 and includes correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients included Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The Bates Worldwide, Inc. ("Bates") Records span the years 1934-2003 and include correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century.

Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients include Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The collection is organized into ten series and one cumulative subject index--Client Files, Corporate Communications Department, Creative Department, Financial Records, Human Resources Department, Memorabilia, New Business, Print Books, Vertical Files and Audiovisual Materials. The Client Files Series includes research reports, storyboards and graphic designs for Bates' clients. The Corporate Communications Department Series includes company-wide memoranda, public relations policy manuals, and a large file of biographical sketches and photographs of Bates' executives, as well as news clippings and press releases relating to the company and its clients. The Creative Department Series primarily focuses on Bates' efforts to stimulate creativity throughout its worldwide offices through participation in internal and industry-wide advertising competitions. The Financial Records Series includes general ledgers and other accounting reports. The Human Resources Department Series includes employee benefits literature and information on company affairs including press releases and staff memoranda. The Memorabilia Series includes promotional clothing, games, office posters and awards. The New Business Series includes materials relating to requests for proposals from prospective clients. The Print Books Series contains material from over 100 albums of proof sheets and print advertisements from existing clients. The Vertical Files Series consists of an alphabetical file of general information collected to aid in various aspects of company operations. The Audiovisual Materials Series contains periodic review collections of advertising, video memoranda, speeches, retirement presentations and highlight compilations prepared for prospective clients and award show consideration. A Subject Cross-Reference Index at the end of the finding aid links materials pertaining to specific clients, corporations, events and policies scattered throughout the various subject series.

Some materials were received as electronic files. Disks were assigned consecutive numbers reflecting the order in which they were encountered. If a work has a corresponding or associated electronic file, the file is included in the container list. The contents of each disk have been migrated to the Special Collections server. Consequently, the contents of these disks are available only in correspondingly numbered electronic subdirectories. Consult a reference archivist for access to the electronic files.

1 result in this collection
Folder
Virgin Atlantic Airways, box NB38 Virgin Records, box NB38 Visa USA, box NB38 Visine (see also Pfizer
, box CR11 Oakley, box NB27 Ocean Spray, boxes NB27, PB7 Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP

Listed below are audiovisual materials that require production of access copies before use.

Subject Cross-Reference Index
  1. 141 Communicator, box CL1
  2. 141 Worldwide, box CC66
  3. 1-800-Flowers, box NB6
  4. 53 International, box NB6
  5. 77th St. Streetwear, box CR21
  6. A&E, boxes CL6, NB6
  7. A.T. Cross (Cross pens), box NB8
  8. AAAA: see American Association of Advertising Agencies
  9. AAF: see American Advertising Foundation
  10. Aalborg Extra, box CL6
  11. AAMCO, box NB6
  12. AAR Partners, box NB6
  13. AC & R, boxes CC97, HR2, HR6
  14. ACE (Beckton Dickinson), box CC19
  15. Achenbaum, Alvin A., boxes AVO2, CC99
  16. ACP Gourmet Traveler, box CR10
  17. Activo (Warner-Lambert), box CL134
  18. Acxiom Corporation, box NB6
  19. Ad Club of New York, box CC4
  20. Ad Council, boxes CC4, CC19, CL6, PB75A, PB98
  21. Ad Partner, box CC5
  22. Adams (Body Smarts), box CC19
  23. Adidas, box NB6
  24. Admap, 2001 Oct, box NB1
  25. Advertising Age, boxes CC36, CC37, NB1
  26. Advertising Agency Search Service, box NB6
  27. Advertising Women of New York, box CC5
  28. Adweek, boxes CC38, CC67
  29. Agency, box CC39
  30. AIDS Foundation, box PB93
  31. Airtime/TV3, box CR26
  32. Aksjon 2000/Y2K Problem, box CR15
  33. Albert, Newhoff, and Burr, box CC63
  34. Alcon, boxes PB109, PB119
  35. Alis, box CR36
  36. Allen and Dorward, box CC63
  37. Allied Domecq, boxes CC19, CL6, PB129
  38. Alltel, box NB42
  39. American Advertising Federation (AAF), box AVO38, CC4
  40. American Advertising Hall of Fame Luncheon, box CC55
  41. American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA), boxes CC4, PB75A
  42. American Chemistry Council, box NB6
  43. American Chicle, boxes HR14, PB7, PB19, PB33
  44. American Cyanamid, boxes PB34, PB46, PB58
  45. American Express, boxes CR39, CR45
  46. American Foundation for the Blind, box PB75A
  47. American Plastics, box NB6
  48. American Public Transportation Association, box NB6
  49. American Standard, box NB6
  50. American Suzuki, box NB6
  51. Amgen, box NB6
  52. Aminoff, Susan, box CC99
  53. Amnesty International, boxes CR15, CR47
  54. Amtrak, boxes NB6, NB7
  55. Anheuser Busch, box NB7
  56. Animal Planet, box NB7
  57. Ansett Australia, boxes CR29, CR36
  58. Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, box NB7
  59. AO Safety, boxes CR35, CR48
  60. AOL Time-Warner, box NB7
  61. Apple and Eve Juice Company, box NB7
  62. Araldite, box CR20
  63. ARANESP, box NB7
  64. Arctangent, box NB7
  65. Argosy Casino, box CC19
  66. Arnott's, boxes CR20, CR29, NB7
  67. Aroyan, Edward, box CC99
  68. Arrid (Carter-Wallace), boxes CL6, CL30-CL38, PB93
  69. Art Perform, box CR20
  70. Arthur Andersen and Co., box CC63
  71. Arthur D. Little, Inc., box NB7
  72. Artzet, Edwin L., box CC100
  73. Aruba Tourism, box PB111
  74. Assistencia Medica Internacional, box CR47
  75. Assumma, Frank, boxes AVO24, CC99
  76. ASSY 2000, box CR36
  77. Asta Medica, box CR39
  78. Astoria Federal Savings, box NB8
  79. AT & T Business, box NB8
  80. Audi, boxes CR10, CR20, CR28, CR29, CR34-CR36, CR39, CR48, CR50, NB8
  81. Autotelegraaf, box CR29
  82. Avery, Graham, box CC100
  83. Avis, boxes CC20, CL6, NB8, PB44, PB64, PB77, PB88, PB93, PB120, PB130
  84. Baan Company, box CC21
  85. Backer & Spielvogel, box HR15
  86. Backer Spielvogel Bates, boxes AVO2-AVO21, CL7-CL10, HR6, HR22, HR23, HR45, HR46, PB28, PB75
  87. Backer, William (Bill), boxes AVO3-AVO4, CC100, HR43
  88. Bailey's Irish Cream, box CL118
  89. Baldwin, Joanna, box CC100
  90. Bali Company, box NB8
  91. Ballantine/Sauza, boxes CR20, CR39, CR45, NB8
  92. Bank of America, boxes NB8, NB9
  93. Barnes & Thornburg, boxes CR39, CR45
  94. Barnes and Noble, box NB9
  95. Barnett Bank, box NB9
  96. Basile, Paul, box CC100
  97. Bassell, Gary, box CC100
  98. BAT Romania/Viceroy, box CR13
  99. Bates Buzz, box CC40
  100. Bates Healthcare, box NB1
  101. Bates Latin America, box CR20
  102. Bates Media, box CC36
  103. Bates News, boxes CC40, CR41
  104. Bates North, box CC55
  105. Bates Poland, box CR12
  106. Bates South Africa, box CL6
  107. Bates Ukraine, box CR12
  108. Bates Worldwide, boxes AVO36, AVO37, CL6
  109. Bates, Theodore (Ted), boxes AVO24, CC100, HR15, HR43
  110. Battery, box CR39
  111. Becker, Michael, box HR41
  112. Becker, Robert, box CC63
  113. Beconase (Glaxo), box CL134
  114. Bed, Bath & Beyond, box NB9
  115. Beech-nut, box NB9
  116. Beefeater, box NB9
  117. Belfa, box CR45
  118. Bell South (see also SBC Communications), boxes CC21, CL11, CR39, NB9, NB10, NB42
  119. Benadryl, boxes PB93, PB118, PB125
  120. Bendelac, Stanley, box CC100
  121. Bennett, Steve, box CC100
  122. Benylin, box CR35
  123. Bermuda Department of Tourism, box NB10
  124. Bescoby, Janet, box CC100
  125. Best Buy, box NB10
  126. Best of Bates awards, box CC6
  127. Bestfood's/Entemann's, boxes CC21, NB10, PB86, PB89, PB121
  128. Beta (Sony), box CL4
  129. BGV PCS, box NB10
  130. Bianco, Zel, box AVO24
  131. Bic Corporation, box NB10
  132. BJ Wholesale, box NB10
  133. Bloom Agency, box CC63
  134. Blue Cross Blue Shield, box NB10
  135. Blue Galleon, box NB11
  136. Bluefly.com, boxes NB10, NB11
  137. BMW, boxes CR39, CR45
  138. BoardIt.com, box CR29
  139. Bob's Stores, box NB11
  140. Boda Nova, box CR20
  141. BodySmarts, box NB11
  142. Boeing, box NB11
  143. Bolla wines, box CL11
  144. Bonjour, box PB30
  145. Boomerang Tracking, box NB11
  146. Borden's, boxes PB8, PB20
  147. Bose, box CR20
  148. Boston Beer Co., box NB11
  149. Bradley, Stephanie, box CC101
  150. Brandwise LLC, box NB11
  151. Brazilian Transplant Association, box CR15
  152. Breck, boxes PB8, PB20
  153. Bridgestone, box CR29
  154. Brightlane.com, box PB93
  155. Brightline Technologies, box CL11
  156. Bristol Myers, box PB9
  157. British Airways, boxes NB11, PB71, PB78, PB86
  158. British American Tobacco (see also Brown & Williamson), boxes CR10, CR12, CC21
  159. Broadway Association Incorporated, box CC5
  160. Brown & Williamson (see also Lucky Strike), boxes AVO1, CC21, NB11
  161. Browne, Noel, box CC101
  162. Brune, Chris, box AVO24
  163. Bruns, Robert, boxes HR24, HR41
  164. Bryggentoveningen, box CR10
  165. Bryggerigruppen, box CR10
  166. BT, boxes CR35, CR39
  167. Buick, box CR29
  168. Bungey, Michael, boxes AVO5-AVO7, AVO25, CC56, CC60, CC69, CC101-CC105
  169. Burger King, box NB11
  170. Burroughs Wellcome (see also Warner Wellcome), boxes CC21, CL16-CL20, PB76, PB89, PB94
  171. Butt, Richard, box CC106
  172. Cable and Wireless, box PB131
  173. Cabletrom, box PB93
  174. Cabletron Systems, box CL23
  175. Cadbury Adams (Certs), box HR13
  176. Cadbury-Schweppes, box NB11
  177. Caffera, John, box CC106
  178. Caggiano, Tom, box CC106
  179. Caldor, box NB11
  180. Calgary (see also Miller Brewing Company), box PB40
  181. Caltex, boxes CR20, CR23, CR28, CR29
  182. Camel cigarettes (R.J. Reynolds), boxes CR20, CR26, CR29, CR35
  183. Campaign, box CC39
  184. Campbell Soup Company, boxes CC21, CC22, CL3-CL5, CL24, NB11, PB28, PB43, PB76, PB92, PB93, PB112
  185. Campbell-Mithun Esty, box CC63
  186. Campbell-Mithun Inc., boxes CC63, HR2
  187. Cancer Foundation of Western Australia, boxes CR15, CR28
  188. Cannon, box NB11
  189. Cap Gemini Ernst & Young, box NB11
  190. Capital One, box NB11
  191. Careerbuilder.com, box NB11
  192. Careerengine.com, box NB11
  193. Cargill, box NB12
  194. Caribbean Tourism, boxes PB93, PB106, PB111
  195. Caribiner, box HR3
  196. Carlton Ale, box CR40
  197. Carlton Gold, box CR35
  198. Carnival Cruise Lines, boxes NB12, NB44
  199. Carpenter, Tom, box CC106
  200. Carrier Corporation, boxes CR10, NB12
  201. Carter, Arthur, box AVO7
  202. Carter-Horner, box CR20
  203. Carter's New Little Pills (Carter-Wallace), box CL40
  204. Carter-Wallace (see also Arrid, Trojan), boxes AVO1, AVO7, CC22, CL6, CL25-CL29, CL40-CL42, PB10, PB21, PB34, PB46, PB58, PB66, PB89, PB94, PB99, PB107, PB119, PB129,
  205. Cartier, box NB12
  206. Catto's Scotch Whiskey, box CL118
  207. Cause of Results, box NB12
  208. CBS, boxes PB65, PB82, PB109, PB127
  209. CBS Broadcast Group, box CC22
  210. CCG.XM, boxes CC68, CC98
  211. CDW, boxes CL51, NB12, PB93, PB118, PB124
  212. Centenary Institute, box CR20
  213. Center for Communication, box CC5
  214. Century 21, box NB12
  215. Certs (Cadbury Adams), box HR13
  216. Champion Products, box NB12
  217. Champs, boxes PB93, PB108, PB122
  218. Channel One Communication, box NB12
  219. Charter, box NB12
  220. Chase, box PB123
  221. Chase Chemical, box PB116
  222. Chase Manhattan Bank, boxes CL51-CL52, PB10
  223. Chattem, box NB12
  224. Chemical Bank, boxes CL51-CL52
  225. Chemical Geoserve, box PB106
  226. Chevron-Texaco, boxes NB12, NB13
  227. Chiat Day, box HR3
  228. Child Relief and You, box CR10
  229. Children's Health Insurance Program, box NB13
  230. Children's Television Workshop, box NB13
  231. Christensen, Andrea, boxes CL26, CL45
  232. Chrysler Building, box AVO8, CC80
  233. Cincinnati Bell, box NB13
  234. Cinemax, boxes PB46, PB58A, PB67
  235. Cinnaburst (see also Warner-Lambert), box PB93
  236. Circuit City, box NB13
  237. Cisco Systems, boxes CL51, NB13
  238. CIT, box NB13
  239. Citgo, box NB13
  240. Citibank-Direct, box NB13
  241. Citizen Watch, boxes CL52, NB13, NB14
  242. Citizen's Bank, box NB14
  243. Citron, John, box CC106
  244. Cityview Apartment Homes, box CL6
  245. Clairol (see also Procter & Gamble), boxes NB14, PB21
  246. Clark, Chris, box CC106
  247. Classico, box NB14
  248. Clinique, boxes PB93, PB117, PB128, PB132
  249. Clinton (President William), box CC106
  250. Clio awards, box CC6
  251. Clio Awards winners, 2001, box NB1
  252. Clipper beer (see also Miller Brewing Co.), box CL3
  253. Clorets, boxes CR10, cr45
  254. CMGI, Inc., box NB14
  255. CNN (Cable News Network), boxes AVO8, CC22
  256. CNS, Inc., box NB14
  257. Coca-Cola Company (Coke), boxes CC23, nb14
  258. Colgate, boxes PB11, PB20, PB35, PB45
  259. Colgate-Palmolive, box NB14
  260. Comedy Central, box NB14
  261. Comet rice, box CL6
  262. Commodore Computers, box PB44
  263. Common, William, box CC106
  264. Compaq, boxes CC23, NB14, NB15
  265. Compuserve, box NB15
  266. Computer Associates International, box NB15
  267. Conagra, box NB15
  268. Conair, box PB12
  269. Concerta, box NB15
  270. Condado Plaza, box PB111
  271. Conference Board, box CC5
  272. Conoco, box NB15
  273. Consejo Publicitario Argentino, box CR10
  274. Continental Airlines, box NB15
  275. Cooper, Irwin, box AVO9
  276. Coors Brewing Company, boxes NB15, PB12, PB36
  277. Cordiant Communications Group, boxes AVO37-AVO38, CC84-CC86, HR11, HR49, NB2, CC66
  278. Corona beer, box CR26
  279. Corporacion INCSA, box CR40
  280. Corporate Angel Network (CAN), box CC23
  281. Corrigan, Tim, boxes AVO9, CC106
  282. Court TV, box NB15
  283. Courtemanche, Howard, box CC106
  284. Cousins, Geoffrey, box AVO9
  285. Coyne, Kevin, box CC106
  286. CPC International (see also Bestfoods), box CC23
  287. Cracknell, Andrew, box AVO9, CC107
  288. Crain's, box CC39
  289. Credit Suisse/First Boston, boxes NB15, NB16
  290. CricketNext.com, boxes CR29, CR35
  291. Croft Original Sherry, box CL118
  292. Crown Lager, box CR20
  293. Cuisinart, box NB16
  294. Cuisine Solutions, box NB16
  295. Cunard Lines, boxes CC23, CL53-CL56, PB93, PB100, PB108, PB122, PB128
  296. Cushman & Wakefield, box NB16
  297. Cutty Sark, boxes CR18, CR40
  298. CVS, boxes CC23, NB17, PB128
  299. Cystic Fibrosis, box CR28
  300. Dane, Max, box CL6
  301. D'Angelo, Art, boxes CC69, CC107
  302. Danish Distillers, box CR20
  303. Danish Rail, box CR20
  304. Dannon, box NB17
  305. Datek Online Brokerage Services, box NB17
  306. Datex, box CR29
  307. Davis and Geck, boxes PB109, PB119
  308. Dawn, box CC63
  309. DeBain, Debbie, box CC60
  310. Debreceni, John, box CC107
  311. Del Monte, box NB17
  312. Delaney, box CC39
  313. Dell Computers, box NB17
  314. Della Femina, Jerry, box HR41
  315. Deloitte, box NB17
  316. Delta Airlines, box NB17
  317. Demi-Tasse, box CL118
  318. Denehy, Micky, box CC107
  319. Dentyne Ice (see also Pfizer), boxes CL123, CL134, PB125
  320. Derivion, boxes CL57, PB93
  321. Desitin (see also Warner-Lambert), box PB118
  322. Deutsche Bank, box CR10
  323. DG Bank, box NB17
  324. DHL, boxes CR10, CR40, PB46A
  325. Dial Corporation, box NB17
  326. Diamond, Healthworld, and Waterloo, box CC67
  327. Dick-Rath, Deborah, box CL26
  328. DiPasca, Rodger, boxes CL27, CL125
  329. Discovery Channel/Animal Planet, boxes CR10, CR18
  330. Discovery Networks, box NB17
  331. Discovery.com, box NB17
  332. Disney: see Walt Disney, box NB18
  333. Dolan, Bernie, box CC107
  334. Dole, box PB68
  335. Donaldson, William, box AVO15
  336. Donino, White, and Partners, box CC72
  337. Double Click, box NB18
  338. Dr. Scholl's, boxes PB37, PB47, PB58
  339. DRM, box PB123
  340. DTAC, box CR40
  341. Dudynskay, Michael N., box CC107
  342. Duffy-Mott, box PB33
  343. Dunlop Maxfly Sports Corporation, box NB18
  344. Dupont, box NB18
  345. Duracell, box NB18
  346. E & J Gallo, box NB18
  347. E.D.S. (Electronic Data Systems), box CC23
  348. Earth's Choice, box CR29
  349. Easdon, Don, box CC107
  350. Eastman Kodak, box CL57
  351. Eazor, Joe, box CC107
  352. eBook (RCA), box NB18
  353. Eckerd, box NB18
  354. Eddie Bauer, box NB18
  355. EDS, boxes CR10, PB93, PB123, PB129
  356. Egmont comics, box CR40
  357. Eisnor, box NB18
  358. Electric Art, box CR20
  359. Electrolux, boxes CL6, PB7, PB13, PB34, PB93
  360. EnBW Energy, box CR29
  361. Endless Pain, box CR35
  362. Energizer, box CL6, NB18
  363. Energy Australia, box CR10
  364. Epilady, box CR51
  365. Ericsson Cellular, box CC23
  366. ESPN, boxes CC23, CC24, CR10, CR26, CR40
  367. Estée Lauder, boxes CC24, CL6, PB113, PB118, PB124
  368. ETA barbecue sauce, box CR20
  369. Ethan Allen, box NB18
  370. Europcar, box CR45
  371. Eveready, box CL58
  372. EVineyards, box NB18
  373. Falcon Jet, box PB99
  374. Farmindustria, box CR10
  375. Fawcett, John, boxes AVO26, AVO31, AVO38, CC56, CC107
  376. Federal Voting Assistance Program, box CL6
  377. FedEx, box NB18
  378. Fidelity Investments, box NB18
  379. Fiedler, John, box HR41
  380. Financial Times, box NB18
  381. Finesse (Helene Curtis), boxes CL3, CL4
  382. First Response, box PB93
  383. Fisher Price, boxes PB57, PB93
  384. Florida Prepaid College Board, box NB18
  385. Florsheim, box NB18
  386. Follow the Rabbit, box NB18
  387. Food Network, box NB18
  388. Foot Locker, boxes CC24, CL58-CL62, PB93, PB106, PB107, PB121
  389. Forbes, boxes CR36, CR41
  390. Forest Labs, box NB18
  391. Fortune International, box CC39
  392. Foster, Archie (Archibald McGeorge), box HR41
  393. Foster's, boxes CR29, CR35, NB18
  394. France Telecom, box NB18
  395. Frankfurter Allgemeine, box CR18
  396. Frank's Nursery and Crafts, box NB18
  397. Fresto (Warner-Lambert), box CL134
  398. Friends of the Earth, box CR28
  399. Froelich, Bob, boxes AVO26 CC107
  400. Fruit of the Loom, box NB18
  401. Frutali (Warner-Lambert), box CL134
  402. FT.com, box NB18
  403. Fuji, box NB18
  404. Future Kids, box CR48
  405. Futures @ Net, box NB18
  406. Gadzooks, box NB18
  407. Gamble, Robert, box CC107
  408. Gateway, box NB18
  409. Gaz Metropolitan, box CR12
  410. GE (General Electric), boxes PB93, PB130
  411. GECC (General Electric Capital Corporation), boxes PB99, PB110
  412. Geiger, Joan, box HR41
  413. General Felt, boxes PB101, PB111
  414. General Foods, boxes PB22, PB38, PB46A, PB54
  415. General Motors, box NB18
  416. Gentleman magazine, box CR10
  417. Gerald Stevens, box NB18
  418. Gilbey Canada, box CL118
  419. Gilette, box NB18
  420. GlaxoSmithKline, box CR41
  421. GNC, box NB18
  422. Go Beyond meeting, box CC56
  423. Goldman Sachs, box NB18
  424. Goldstein, Leonard, box AVO26
  425. Gore-Tex, box NB18
  426. Granath, box CR45
  427. Grand Bay Hotels, box NB19
  428. Green Mountain, box NB19
  429. Grey Advertising, boxes CL75-CL82
  430. Grignon, Perianne, box CC107
  431. Grolsch, box NB36
  432. Group Telecom, box CR41
  433. Groupom, box CR20
  434. GTE (General Telephone), boxes CC24, PB93
  435. Gury, Jeremy, box HR41
  436. Gymboree Corporation, box NB19
  437. Hackett, Randall, box CC107
  438. Haddad, box PB89
  439. Hahn, Carole, box CC107
  440. Hallmark, box NB19
  441. Hamill, Alex, box CC107
  442. Hamilton Island, boxes CR13, CR46
  443. Hamilton, Rich, box CC108
  444. Hart, Timothy, box CC108
  445. Hasbro Incorporated, box NB19
  446. HBO (Home Box Office), boxes CC24, NB19, PB23, PB39
  447. Health and Hospitals Corporation, box NB19
  448. Health Net, box NB19
  449. Healthmark, box CC63
  450. Healthworld, box CC24
  451. Hearn, Colin, boxes CC60, CC108
  452. Hearn, David, box AVO27
  453. Hefty, boxes PB14, PB35
  454. Heineken, boxes CR19, CR29, CR35, CR37, CR48, NB19
  455. Heinz (H.J. Heinz), boxes CL6, CR12, NB19
  456. Helene Curtis, boxes CL3, PB31
  457. Help USA, box PB118
  458. Herbert, Ike, box AVO11
  459. Hertz Rent-a-Car, boxes CL63-CL64, PB14
  460. Heublein, boxes PB109, PB120, PB130
  461. Hewlett-Packard, box NB19
  462. Hilton, box NB19
  463. Hindustani Lever, box CR20
  464. Hinton, Graham, box CC108
  465. Hire.com, box NB43
  466. History Channel, box NB19
  467. Hoefer, Dieterich, and Brown, box CC63
  468. Hoffman Advertising Group, box CC63
  469. Hoffman-La Roche, box CL69
  470. Hoganas Keramik, box CR10
  471. Holiday Inn, box PB93
  472. Holland House, box PB48
  473. Holloway Sportswear, boxes AVO1, NB19
  474. Holmen, Robert, box HR24
  475. Holten, Morgens, box AVO11
  476. Home Depot, box NB19
  477. Hoosier Lottery, box CC24
  478. Horton, Church, and Goff, box CC64
  479. House of Prince, boxes CR10, CR41
  480. Howard Johnson (HoJo), box PB110
  481. Howard Swink, box CC64
  482. HP: see Hewlett-Packard, box NB19
  483. Humphrey, Browning, and McDougall, box CC64
  484. Hyatt International Corporation, box NB19
  485. Hyundai, boxes AVO1, AVO11, CC24-CC26, CL65-CL68, CR41, CR46, PB51, PB61, PB72, PB79, PB93, PB125
  486. IAA (International Advertising Association), boxes AVO12, CC5
  487. Icon Megastore, box CR35
  488. IKEA, boxes CR13, CR28, CR46, NB20, NB41
  489. Imperial Tobacco, box CL69
  490. Inchape, box CR13
  491. India tourism, box CR20
  492. Indianapolis Colts (football team), box CC27
  493. Industrial National Bank, box PB15
  494. Infogrames Incorporated, box NB20
  495. ING Group, box NB20
  496. Ingalls Association, box CC64
  497. Instant Photo (Sony), box CL4
  498. Instinet.com, box NB20
  499. Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia Preventiva, box CR47
  500. Integrated Health (TAP Pharmaceuticals), box NB20
  501. Intel, box NB20
  502. Interactive Edge, box CC27
  503. Interland, box PB93
  504. International Continental Baking (ITT CBC; see also Wonder), boxes PB9, PB45
  505. International Olympic Committee, box NB20
  506. International SOS, box CR29
  507. Internet Security Systems, boxes CL6, PB118
  508. Intuit Incorporated, box NB20
  509. Investor and Analyst presentation, box CC57
  510. IRTS (International Radio and Television Society), box CC5
  511. Israel Ministry of Tourism, box PB111
  512. ISS, box PB124
  513. ISS (Internet Security Systems), box NB20
  514. Ivey School of Business, box CR29
  515. J&B Scotch Whiskey, boxes CL118-CL119
  516. J.I. Case, box NB20
  517. J.P. Morgan, box NB20
  518. Jacoby, Robert, boxes HR24, HR41
  519. Jador, boxes PB16, PB19
  520. Jaguar, box CR10
  521. Jamont, box CC27
  522. JCPenney, box NB20
  523. Jaret International, box NB20
  524. Jenny Craig, box NB20
  525. Jergens, box NB20
  526. JetBlue Airways, box NB20
  527. Jhirmack, box PB79
  528. Jimmi Taco Sauce, box CR41
  529. Jockey, box CR21
  530. Jockey, box NB20
  531. Joint Recruiting Advertising Program (JRAP), boxes CC27, CL6, CL69-82, CR36, NB21, PB92, PB118,
  532. Jones-Lundin Associates, box NB20
  533. Joop!, box PB87
  534. Jose Cuervo, box PB131
  535. Joseph Garneau, boxes HR24, PB24, PB38, PB54
  536. Juice Works (Campbell Soup Co.), box CL3
  537. Just diamond, boxes CR10, CR21, CR29
  538. Just gold, box CR29
  539. Just Having Fun, box NB21
  540. Just My Size, box NB21
  541. Kahlua, boxes CR30, CR31
  542. Kahn, Dominique, box CC108
  543. Kaiser beer, boxes CR22, CR23, CR42
  544. Kal Kan, boxes PB15, PB25, PB35, PB45, PB59, PB68, PB73, PB84, PB101, PB114
  545. Kapsky, Mark, box CC108
  546. Kaszner, Charles, box CC108
  547. Kaufman & Board Home Corporation, box NB21
  548. Kearns, W.H., box HR42
  549. Kellam, Alan, box CC108
  550. Kellogg Company, box NB21
  551. Kennedy, Neil, box CC108
  552. Kenyon & Eckhardt, box HR3
  553. KFC USA (Kentucky Fried Chicken), box NB21
  554. Kinney Shoes (Woolworth Specialty Footwear Division), boxes CC27, CL83-87, NB21, PB87, PB119
  555. Knisley, Patrick, box CC108
  556. Knockando Scotch Whiskey, box CL119
  557. Knoll Pharmaceuticals, box NB21
  558. Kobrand, Alize, box NB21
  559. Kobs & Brady, box CL132
  560. Kobs and Draft, boxes CC64, CC65, CC76
  561. Kool (see also Brown & Williamson), boxes CL11, CL15, PB22, PB118
  562. Kost, Steve, box CC108
  563. KPMG, boxes CL88, NB21
  564. Krev, Mitch, box CL27
  565. L.L. Bean, box NB22
  566. Labatt USA, box NB21
  567. Lady's Choice (see also Carter-Wallace), box CL39
  568. Lancaster, boxes PB85, PB86, PB93, PB102, PB115
  569. Land Rover, boxes CR21, CR22, CR31, CR49
  570. Land's End, box NB21
  571. Larson and Bateman, box CC65
  572. Latino marketing (Bates South), box NB3
  573. Laxatives, box CL40
  574. Lazard Freres, box CC65
  575. Lazarus, Kara, box CC108
  576. Lazarus, Shelley, box CC108
  577. Le Meridian, boxes CR31, CR35
  578. Lee, Spike, box CC60
  579. Lego Systems, box NB21
  580. Leiner, box NB21
  581. Leisure Planet, box NB21
  582. Lenz, Bob, boxes AVO13-AVO14, HR24
  583. Leung, Matthew, box CL28
  584. Levi Strauss & Co., boxes NB21, NB22
  585. Levine, Paul, box CC108
  586. Levitt, Theodore, box AVO27
  587. Lexis-Nexis, box NB22
  588. Lexmark, box NB22
  589. Light, Larry, box AVO41, HR42
  590. Lighthouse, box NB22
  591. Lighthouse Global Network, Inc., box CC67
  592. Limited Brands, box NB22
  593. Lindt Chocolates, box NB22
  594. Lipitor, box PB87
  595. Lojack, box NB22
  596. Los Angeles Dodgers, box NB22
  597. Loto/Moet, box CR18
  598. Louis Rich, boxes PB46A, PB54
  599. Löwenbräu (see also Miller Brewing Company), boxes CL2-CL4, PB40
  600. Lubriderm (see also Pfizer), box CL6
  601. Lucky Strike (see also Brown & Williamson), boxes CL11-CL15, PB87, PB118, PB125
  602. Luxottica, box NB22
  603. Lycos, box NB22
  604. Lysol, box NB22
  605. M&M/Mars, boxes AVO27, CC27, CL6, PB4, PB17, PB21, PB38, PB46A, PB54, PB58A, PB66, PB73, PB84, PB101, PB114
  606. MacLennan, Ross, box HR42
  607. MacQuarie University, boxes CR35, CR36
  608. Magnavox (North American Philips), boxes PB55, PB76, PB87, PB92
  609. Magnum malt liquor (see also Miller Brewing Company), box CL3
  610. Major League Baseball, box NB22
  611. Malibu, box CL119
  612. Mandarin Oriental Hotels, box CL6
  613. MapQuest, box PB130
  614. Marchese, John, boxes CC56, CC108
  615. Marconi PLC, boxes CL89, NB22-NB24
  616. Marine Midland Bank, box NB24
  617. Marriot, box NB24
  618. Mastercard, box NB24
  619. Mattel Inc., box NB24
  620. Maxell, boxes CL89, PB114, PB123
  621. Maxrate.com, box CL89
  622. Maybelline, boxes PB13, PB21, PB36, PB58
  623. Mayer, Martin, box HR42
  624. Mazzuchelli, Robert, box CC108
  625. MCA/Universal, box NB24
  626. McBride, Gary, box CC109
  627. McCaffrey & McCall, boxes CC72, CL135
  628. McCann-Erickson, boxes CL108-CL109
  629. McDonalds - Boston Franchise Group, box NB24
  630. McIllhenny-Tabasco, box CR21
  631. McKennan, Jim, box CC109
  632. Meadow Lea Foods, box NB24
  633. Media, box CC54
  634. Mego, boxes PB25, PB34
  635. Meineke, box NB24
  636. Meister Brau (see also Miller Brewing Company), boxes CL4, CL5, PB40
  637. Melanson, Anne, box CC109
  638. Men's Wearhouse, box NB24
  639. Mercedes Benz, boxes CR11, CR21, CR24, CR331, CR424
  640. Met Life (Metropolitan Life Insurance), box NB24
  641. Metropolitan Museum of Art, boxes CL90, PB75A
  642. MG, box CR42
  643. MH20, box NB24
  644. Michelin North America, box NB24
  645. Michelob (Anheuser Busch), box PB45
  646. Midas Inc., box NB24
  647. Midtown Golf, box CL6
  648. Midway Games, box NB24
  649. Militarycareers.com, box NB24
  650. Millennium Foundation, boxes CR16, CR28
  651. Miller Brewing Company, boxes CC27-CC29, CL91-CL112, PB2, PB6, PB40, PB56, PB69, PB83, PB87, PB97, PB112
  652. Miller High Life (see also Miller Brewing Company), boxes CL1-CL5
  653. Mini Cooper, box CR45
  654. Minute Maid, box NB24
  655. Mobil, boxes PB14, PB45
  656. Modell's, box NB24
  657. Mohegan Sun, box NB24
  658. Molson Breweries, box NB24
  659. Monahan, Tom, box CC60
  660. Monarch Pharmaceuticals (Altace), box NB24
  661. Monster.com, boxes AVO1, NB24
  662. Montgelas, Rudolph, box HR42
  663. Montgomery Ward, box NB24
  664. Morgan Anderson & Co., box NB25
  665. Morris, Mark, boxes AVO28, CC56, CC109, CL16, HR42
  666. Motorola, boxes NB25, NB26
  667. Mount Sinai, box CC29
  668. Mova Regional, box CR28
  669. MP Total Care, box NB26
  670. Mr. Hero, box NB26
  671. Murata Electronics, boxes CL6, CL113, CR35, PB118, PB124
  672. Murray, John, box AVO13
  673. Museum of Television and Radio, box CC5
  674. Music Bank, box NB26
  675. Mustang/Joop! Jeans, boxes PB86, PB102, PB115
  676. MVP.com, box NB26
  677. Myanmar Brewery, box CL6
  678. Nabisco, boxes HR14, PB13
  679. Nadler and Larimer, box CC66
  680. Nair, boxes PB87, PB118
  681. Napa Auto Parts, box NB26
  682. National Discount Brokers, box NB26
  683. National Geographic, boxes CL113, CR50
  684. Nationwide Advertising Service, box CC66
  685. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), box CC29
  686. NCR, boxes CL4, CL5, PB49
  687. Needham Harper & Steers, box HR3
  688. Neogenic Pharmaceuticals, box NB26
  689. Neosporin (see also Warner-Lambert), boxes CL6, PB87
  690. Nestlé Purina, box NB26
  691. Net2Phone, box NB26
  692. Neupogen, box NB26
  693. New Moment Design, box CR21
  694. New World Mobility, boxes CR35, CR49
  695. New York Knicks, box NB27
  696. New York Landmarks Preservation Commission, box CC29
  697. New York Lottery, boxes NB26, NB27
  698. New York Public Library, box CC5
  699. New York Racing Association, boxes PB81, PB90, PB103
  700. New York Times, box NB27
  701. Newman, Richard, box CC109
  702. Nextel, box NB27
  703. Nicorette, box HR14
  704. Nike Inc., box NB27
  705. Nikon, boxes NB27, NB45
  706. No Regrets, box CR36
  707. Nokia, boxes CR11, CR18, CR23, CR24, CR28, CR32, CR35, CR49, CR50, NB27, NB43
  708. Norman, Craig, and Kummel, box CC66
  709. North American Philips (Magnavox), boxes CC29, PB55
  710. Northern Telecom (Nortel), boxes NB27, PB72, PB79, PB82
  711. Northwest Airline, box NB27
  712. Novartis, box NB27
  713. Noxell, box PB31
  714. Nutro Products, box NB27
  715. NYSE, box CC69
  716. NZ Cheese, box CR11
  717. Oakley, box NB27
  718. Ocean Spray, boxes NB27, PB7
  719. Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), boxes CC29, NB27, NB28
  720. Old Forester, box CL6
  721. Old Navy, box NB27
  722. Once, boxes CR33, CR35
  723. One Club for Art and Copy, box CC5
  724. Onida, box CR46
  725. Opensite, box CL113
  726. Operation Graduation, box NB28
  727. Opportunity in Diversity presentation, box CC57
  728. Optimum Online, box NB28
  729. Oracle Corporation, box NB28
  730. Organ Donation Center of Thailand, box CR16
  731. Origins, boxes PB110, PB126
  732. Orion Pictures, box CC29
  733. Orion Telecommunications, box NB28
  734. Orkin, box NB28
  735. Orlando/Orange Country Convention & Visitors Bureau, box NB28
  736. Oronite (ChevronTexaco), box CL6
  737. Osborn, Rick, box CC109
  738. Outdoor Life Network, box NB28
  739. Pacific Sunwear (PacSun), boxes CC29, CR33, NB28
  740. Paddington Corporation, boxes CL114-CL119, PB26, PB32, PB42, PB52, PB62
  741. Palm Bay Imports, box NB28
  742. Panasonic, boxes PB4, PB17, PB27, PB41, PB46A. PB47, PB59
  743. Papagiannacopoulos, Yannis, box CC109
  744. Parke-Davis, box NB28
  745. Parker, Osbert, box AVO28
  746. Parliament (Philip Morris), boxes PB53, PB63, PB74
  747. Parmalat, boxes CC29, NB28, NB29
  748. Partnership for a Drug Free America, boxes CC30, PB129
  749. Paster, Harry, box AVO14
  750. Peace Corps, boxes CC30, CL120-CL122, NB38
  751. Pearl & Dean, box CR13
  752. Pearl Drops (Carter-Wallace), box CL43
  753. Pearson, Steve, box AVO28
  754. Pep Boys, boxes AVO14, NB29
  755. Perrier, boxes PB110, PB126
  756. Person, Sarah, box CC109
  757. Petplace.com, boxes AVO1, NB29
  758. Petsmart, boxes NB29, NB30
  759. Peugeot, box CR13
  760. Pfizer, boxes CL123-CL124, CR13, PB7, PB38, PB46A, PB54, PB68
  761. Pfizer-Lipitor, box NB30
  762. Pharmacia Upjohn, box CR42
  763. Philips Electronics (see also North American Philips), box NB30
  764. Philips-Van Heusen, box NB30
  765. Photonica, box CR13
  766. Picon, Mindy, box CL114
  767. Pier 1 Imports, box NB30
  768. Piker Geroge, box PB36
  769. Pinkham, Richard, box HR42
  770. Pioneer Electronics, box NB30
  771. Pironen, Maria, box CC109
  772. Playboy Enterprises, Inc., box NB30
  773. Playtex, boxes NB30, PB15, PB25
  774. PMC-Sierra, box NB30
  775. PNC Bank, box NB30
  776. Polenguinho Cheese, box CR43
  777. Pond-Jones, Jay, box CC109
  778. Positano, box PB75A
  779. Potenzano, John, box CC109
  780. Precision Drilling, box CL6
  781. Prempro (Wyeth Ayerst Women's Health), box NB30
  782. Prescriptives, box PB117
  783. Presideo, box CL122
  784. Prevacid (TAP Pharmaceuticals), boxes CC30, NB30, PB87, PB118, PB132
  785. Priceline.com, box NB30
  786. Prime Retail, box NB30
  787. Pripp's Breweries, boxes CR11, CR21, CR33
  788. Pró Juréia, box CL6
  789. Proctor & Gamble (see also Clairol), box NB30
  790. Prodigy, box NB30
  791. Progress Software, box NB30
  792. Progressive Insurance, box NB30
  793. Project Hope China, box CR16
  794. Proplayer, box PB117
  795. Pro-Plus, box CR35
  796. Prostate Cancer Research Foundation, box CR47
  797. Provident Financial Services, boxes CR11, CR21
  798. Prudential, box CC30
  799. Prudential, box NB31
  800. Prudential-Bache, boxes PB9, PB24, PB36, PB60, PB70
  801. PSINet, Inc., box NB31
  802. Pulte Corporation, box NB31
  803. Purex, box NB31
  804. Purina: see Ralston Purina
  805. Pusser's Rum, box CL119
  806. Puttner, Gerhard, box CC109
  807. Quaker, box NB31
  808. Quantera, box NB31
  809. Qwest, box NB31
  810. R. J. Reynolds, box PB44
  811. R.R. Donnelley and Sons, box NB32
  812. Radio Corporation of America (RCA) (see also eBook), boxes NB31, PB12, PB25, PB33
  813. Radio Shack, box NB31
  814. Ralston Purina, boxes CL125, NB31
  815. Raw Bar, box CR36
  816. Rayovac Corporation, box NB31
  817. RCI, boxes CR11, NB31
  818. Re/Max, box NB32
  819. Reckitt-Benckiser, box NB31
  820. Red Cross, box NB32
  821. Red Lobster, boxes PB30, PB31
  822. Reebok International/Rockport Company, box NB32
  823. Reeves, Rosser, boxes AVO14, AVO28, AVO29, CC109, CC110, HR15, HR42
  824. Reichel, Walter, box HR42
  825. Relpax, box NB32
  826. Remy Amerique, box NB32
  827. Renaissance Hotels and Resorts, box NB32
  828. Report Card meeting, box CC58
  829. Resort Condominiums, box NB32
  830. Resume.com, box NB32
  831. Revista Negocios, box CR33
  832. Reyburn, David, box CC111
  833. Rezulin (Parke-Davis/Warner-Lambert), boxes NB32, PB87
  834. Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Pharmaceuticals, box NB32
  835. Richards Group, box CC66
  836. Ritz-Carlton, box NB43
  837. RJ Reynolds, box PB33
  838. Robertson, Mike, box CC111
  839. Roche-Rennie, box CR35
  840. Rogers, Ken, box AVO14, AVO29
  841. Roman, Dan, box CC111
  842. Rosenthal, Larry, boxes CL114-CL116
  843. Rover, boxes CR21, CR24, CR26, CR33, CR35, CR42
  844. Rowland, Michael, boxes CL116-CL117
  845. Royal Flying Doctor Service, box CR47
  846. Royal Mail, boxes CR23, CR24, CR28, CR33, CR35. NB32
  847. Royal Olympic Cruises, box NB32
  848. Rubenstein Associates, box NB32
  849. Ruido Group, box NB33
  850. Rutstein, [?], box AVO29
  851. Rumsmiddeldirektoratet, box CR16
  852. Ryder, box NB33
  853. S.B. Thomas Co. (Thomas's English Muffins). box CC30
  854. S.C. Johnson & Sons, box NB34
  855. Saab, box CR43
  856. Saatchi & Saatchi, boxes AVO16, AVO38, CC72-CC74, CC76, CC78, CC86, HR3, HR11, HR49
  857. Safeway, boxes CR21, HR14
  858. Samsonite Corporation, box NB33
  859. Samsung Group, box NB33
  860. Sanders Printup Loomis, box CC66
  861. Sanson-Tricard, Violaine, box CC111
  862. SAP.com, box CR21
  863. Sara Lee Coffees, box NB33
  864. Sara Lee Lingerie, boxes NB33, NB34
  865. Sauza (see also Allied Domecq), boxes NB34, PB118
  866. Save Our Kids, box CR47
  867. Savings & Loan Association, boxes CL3, CL126, PB1, PB3, PB29
  868. SBC Communications, box NB34
  869. Scaros, Dean, box CC111
  870. Scentstrips, box PB86
  871. Scheonfeld, Jay, box CC111
  872. Schering-Plough, box NB34
  873. Schick-Wilkinson Sword, boxes CL127, NB34
  874. Scholastic Entertainment, box NB34
  875. Schoning, Peter, box CC60, CC111
  876. Schwarzkopf, box CR26
  877. Schweitzer, Gary, box CC111
  878. Schweppes, boxes PB14, PB33, PB50
  879. Scunci (L & N Sales and Marketing), box NB34
  880. Seagate Technology, box NB34
  881. Sears Roebuck & Co., boxes AVO15, NB34
  882. Seat, boxes CR11, CR34, CR35, CR43, CR46, CR49
  883. Sempra Energy Solutions, box NB34
  884. Serta, box NB34
  885. Seven-Up, box PB31
  886. Sharp Electronics, box NB34
  887. Shell Oil Company, box CL6
  888. Sheraton, box NB35
  889. Showtime, box NB35
  890. SHR, box NB35
  891. Sidney 2000 Apparel, box CR33
  892. Silberberg, Bob, box CC111
  893. Silver, Jaqueline (Jackie), boxes CC111, HR42
  894. Silver, Jacqueline, box HR42
  895. Silverman, Marylin, box CC111
  896. Simon Project, box CC75
  897. Singer, Claude, box CC111
  898. Sky Television, boxes CR43, CR46, CR49
  899. Slomin's, box NB35
  900. Slosberg, Robert, box CC112
  901. Smith, Ian, box CC112
  902. Smith, Nancy, box CC112
  903. Smith, Steve, boxes CL117-CL118
  904. Smithkline Beecham, box CR11
  905. Solar Inc., box CR35
  906. Sole Technology, box NB35
  907. Sonae.com, box CR43
  908. Sonicare, box NB35
  909. Sony, boxes CL3-CL5, CL128-CL129, CR33
  910. Spalding Sports Worldwide, box NB35
  911. Speakers Bureau, box CC5
  912. Spectranet, box CR33
  913. Spectrum United, boxes CR11, NB35
  914. Speedy (Bates Canada), box NB35
  915. Speilvogel, Carl, boxes AVO15-AVO19, CC66, CC112, HR24, HR43
  916. Sprint, box NB35
  917. St. Francis Friends of the Poor, box PB75A
  918. St. Luke's/Texas Heart Institute, box CL6
  919. Stake, Marcus H., box CC112
  920. Standard Brands Company, box PB12
  921. Stanley Steamer, box NB35
  922. Staples, box NB35
  923. Starwood Lodgings, box NB35
  924. Starz!/ Encore (Liberty Media), box NB35
  925. Stavanger Museum, box CR51
  926. Steele, Gary, box CC112
  927. Stern, Les, boxes AVO31, CC60, CC112
  928. Stone, Marcia, box CC112
  929. Stora, box CR11
  930. Stride Rite, box NB35
  931. Stubbings, John, box CC112
  932. Sturtevant and Hildt, box CC66
  933. Stuyvesant Lights (Scholz and Friends), box CL6
  934. Suave (Helene Curtis), boxes CL3, CL4
  935. Sunkist Growers, Inc., boxes NB35, NB36
  936. Suntours, boxes CR11, CR13
  937. Superdrug, box CR21
  938. Susnjara, Gary M., box CC112
  939. Sydney 200 Apparel, box CR35
  940. Symbol Technologies, box NB36
  941. T. Rowe Price, boxes CC30, NB36, PB99, PB118, PB120, PB125, PB131
  942. T.J. Maxx, box NB36
  943. Taco Bell, box CR44
  944. Taj Bengal, box CR44
  945. TAP Pharmaceuticals (Prevacid), boxes CC30, PB118
  946. Target Corporation, box NB36
  947. Tarrytown Conference, box CC58
  948. Tatnell, Art, box CC112
  949. Taylor, Tony, box CC113
  950. TDC Mobil, box CR44
  951. Ted Bates Inc., boxes AVO38, AVO39, AVO41, PB11, PB20, PB33, PB37, PB48, PB59, PB126
  952. Teen Link, boxes CC17, HR21
  953. Teenage market, boxes CL29, CL31, CL33, CL34, CL49, CL50
  954. Telecom Malaysia, box CL6
  955. Tennis Canada, box CR21
  956. Terzis, Jon J., box CC113
  957. Tetra Pak, box NB36
  958. Texaco, boxes CC30, PB108, PB118, PB122
  959. Thames water, boxes CR33, CR44, CR50
  960. The Gap, box NB18
  961. Thomas' English Muffins, box CL6
  962. Thomasville Furnishings, box NB36
  963. Thompson Medical Co. (Slim Fast), box PB12
  964. Tickets.com, box NB36
  965. Tiffany & Co., box NB36
  966. Time, boxes CR44, CR46
  967. Timex, box NB36
  968. TMT Conference, box CC72
  969. Today's Press clippings, boxes CC42-CC53, NB1
  970. Toothpaste, boxes CL42-CL43
  971. Torello, Judy, boxes CC9, CC10, CC60, CC113
  972. Toshiba, box NB36
  973. Toyota, boxes CR11, CR33
  974. Tracy-Locke Advertising, box HR3
  975. Transworld Airlines, box NB36
  976. Trojan (see also Carter-Wallace), boxes CL6, CL43-CL50, CR35, PB118
  977. Truserv Corp., box NB36
  978. Tucker Wayne, box CC66
  979. Turner, Ted, box AVO16
  980. TV Cable Magazine, box PB39
  981. TV Guide, box NB36
  982. TWA, boxes PB91, PB95, PB95, PB104, PB105
  983. Tyco International, box NB36
  984. UDate.com, box NB36
  985. Ultram (Ortho-McNeal Pharmaceuticals), box NB36
  986. Uncle Ben's, boxes HR24, PB58A, PB68, PB85
  987. UNICEF, boxes CC30, CR16
  988. Unique Selling Proposition (USP), boxes AVO20, AVO22, AVO27, AVO29-AVO31, CC18, CC41, HR12, HR13, NB3, NB4
  989. Unisys Corporation, box NB36
  990. United Airlines, box NB36
  991. United Jewish Appeal-Federation, box CL6
  992. United Parcel Service (UPS), box NB36
  993. Universal Studios, box NB36
  994. Upton, John K., box CC113
  995. Uptown Nails, box NB36
  996. U.S. Airways, box NB36
  997. U.S. Army, box PB110
  998. U.S. Beverages LLC, box NB36
  999. U.S. Mint, boxes CL130, PB68
  1000. U.S. Navy, boxes CL130-CL132, NB37, PB5, PB18, PB19, PB37, PB48
  1001. U.S. Postal Service (USPS), box NB38
  1002. USM Modular Furniture, box CR21
  1003. UUNet, boxes CL133, CR35, NB38, PB118, PB124
  1004. V-8 Juice (see also Campbell Soup Co.), boxes CL3, CL4
  1005. Vala Shopping Mall, box CR11
  1006. Valtrex (Burroughs Wellcome), box CL21
  1007. Van Brunt and Co., box CC66
  1008. Varma, box CR28
  1009. Verizon, boxes CR35, CR46, PB125
  1010. Viewtrade.com, box NB38
  1011. Villacher, box CR33
  1012. Virgin Atlantic Airways, box NB38
  1013. Virgin Records, box NB38
  1014. Visa USA, box NB38
  1015. Visine (see also Pfizer), boxes CL123, CL124, PB46A
  1016. Vlasic Pickles, box NB38
  1017. Volkswagen, boxes CR22, CR35, CR36, CR44, CR46, CR50
  1018. W Hotels, box NB39
  1019. Wahindia.com, box CR33
  1020. Wal-Mart.com, box NB38
  1021. Walsh, Bernard, box CC113
  1022. Walt Disney Company, box NB38
  1023. Warner-Lambert, boxes CC30, CC31, CL134, CR45, HR14, NB38, PB13, PB19, PB33, PB50, PB99, PB118, PB121, PB128, PB132
  1024. Warner-Lambert India, box CR33
  1025. Warner-Wellcome (see also Burroughs-Wellcome), boxes CL16, PB107
  1026. Waste Management, box NB38
  1027. We Can, box CC6
  1028. WebMD, boxes CC7, NB38, NB39
  1029. Webster, boxes PB79, PB82
  1030. Weider Nutrition International, box NB39
  1031. Weinfeld, Mark, box CC113
  1032. Weissman, George, box AVO21
  1033. Welch Foods, box NB39
  1034. Wella, box CR45
  1035. Wendy's, boxes CC31-CC35, CL6, PB85, PB99, PB118, PB124, PB132
  1036. Wendy's ice cream (Australia), box CR33
  1037. Western Union, box NB39
  1038. Westfall Shopping Centre, box CR33
  1039. Westvaco, boxes AVO34, CC35, CL6, CL135, NB39, PB99, PB116, PB118, PB126
  1040. Wheretheheckisit.com, box NB39
  1041. Whiteford, Robert, box AVO35
  1042. Whitehead, Bill, boxes AVO35, CC56, CC113, CC114
  1043. Whitney Museum of American Art, boxes CC6, CC35, CL6, CR22, PB118, PB125
  1044. William Douglas McAdams Inc., box CC66
  1045. Williams, Dylan, box CC114
  1046. Williams-Sonoma, box NB39
  1047. Winn-Dixie, box NB39
  1048. Wiz, box NB39
  1049. Women's Fund of Central Indiana, box PB118
  1050. Wonder (see also Intercontinental Baking), box PB35
  1051. Woolworth's, box CR36
  1052. Worldwide Management meeting, boxes AVO35, AVO36, CC58-CC60, HR26
  1053. Worth.com, box NB39
  1054. Wycoski, R., box AVO39
  1055. Xerox Corporation, boxes NB39, PB80
  1056. Y&R International, box HR3
  1057. Y2Vote.org, box CL6
  1058. Yahoo.com, box CR45
  1059. Yellow Pages, box CR46
  1060. Yo-Go, box CL134
  1061. Yturbe, Jean de, boxes CC107, CC114
  1062. Zanussi, box CR21
  1063. Zany Brainy, box NB39
  1064. Zappy Baby, box CR33
  1065. Zenith Electronics Corporation, boxes CC98, CR33, NB39
  1066. Zoo Safari, box CR45
  1067. Zovirax (see also Burroughs Wellcome), boxes CL21, CL22
  1068. Zuckert, David, box HR42

Audio and video tapes in multiple formats that include speeches, video memoranda, historical overviews and testimonials which commemorate company events such as anniversaries, retirements, and office openings, or pay tribute to the work and legacies of key executives. The series is organized into two categories--Audiovisual Materials Pulled from Other Series and Audiovisual Materials Added to Collection. Materials pulled from the other series have been arranged alphabetically according to the series titles in which they were originally housed, and therein alphabetically by topic and item title. Materials added to the collection have been arranged alphabetically according to the corporate identity responsible for the item's production, and therein alphabetically by topic and item title. Each item has been assigned a unique number that will be used to manage the production of any use copies requested by researchers.

Eltinge-Lord Family papers (Peter Eltinge papers), 1856-1871

Online
7 Linear Feet — 14 boxes — 2,245 Items
Correspondence of Peter Eltinge, an officer in the 156th New York Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War, relating to his service in the Dept. of the Gulf (1863-1864), Maryland and Virginia (1864), and Georgia and the Carolinas (1865), participation in the occupation of Georgia; and operation of a grocery store in Memphis, Tenn., and speculation in cotton after the war. Topics include politics, temperance, economic conditions, Black soldiers in the Union Army, and Black agricultural laborers during Reconstruction. Also, naval records and other papers of George P. Lord of Camden, Del., brother-in-law of Peter Eltinge, chiefly relating to his duty as a navel officer on ironclads of the Mississippi Squadron (1861-1865), including the U.S.S. Chillicothe, U.S.S. Ozark, and U.S.S. Osage. Topics include the Red River Expedition of 1864 and the regulation of commerce on the Mississippi River.

The Eltinge-Lord Family collection consists of the papers of two men related by marriage who served as Union officers in the Civil War. It has been organized into two divisions respectively centered on Peter Eltinge (ca. 1842-1877) of New Paltz, New York, and George P. Lord (ca. 1842-1866) of Camden, Delaware. Lord's marriage to Peter's sister, Mary Eltinge, formed the link between the two. Peter, a store clerk before the war, entered the 156th New Yolk Volunteer Infantry in August, 1862, and rose to the rank of captain. Most of his papers consist of correspondence with his father, Edmund Eltinge, an officer of the Huguenot National Bank in New Paltz, and the other members of his family. George obtained a naval commission in 1861, served with the Mississippi Squadron, and eventually became a lieutenant commander. The bulk of his papers consist of the official records of two of his commands, the U.S.S. Chillicothe and the U.S.S. Ozark . For a brief time in 1864, the two brothers-in-law served in the same theater and met while taking part in Banks' Red River campaign of that year. After the war Eltinge and Lord were partners in a grocery business in Memphis, Tennessee, until Lord's death in August, 1866. Peter Eltinge returned to New Paltz, where he worked in his father's bank and in insurance until his own death at the age of 35.

Filed in the first box of the Lord Division are a printed catalog of the contents of the various official naval records, a typewritten supplement of added material of similar nature, and copies of sketches of ships' histories as given in the U.S. Navy's Dictionary of American Fighting Ships. Filed in the first box of the Eltinge Division are copies of biographical sketches of individuals mentioned in both divisions. Other supplementary material filed at the beginning of the Eltinge collection includes a list of members of the 156th New York Volunteers and the service records of its officers as given in New York and the War of the Rebellion 1861-1865, Vol. 5. Researchers may also wish to consult Will Plank's Banners and Bugles, a popular history of the participation of Ulster County, New York, in the Civil War.

Researchers using the printed and typewritten guides to the Lord Division should be warned that those aids do not definitively describe the current order of those papers. Some material previously considered "undated" has been re-filed in appropriate places in the collection by date. Other peculiarities in both divisions include the filing of such items as general orders, printed materials, etc., in among correspondence and other categories. In such cases the material remains where originally filed and, in the instance of the Lord Division, as listed in the guides provided.

The most important part of the Eltinge Division is Peter's correspondence (1856-1871), which, although it includes one letter from 1856, does not begin with any continuity until 1859, or after he had already lived in New York City for a year. Another gap occurs between April, 1861, and September, 1862, for which there are no letters. The correspondence also becomes very thin after Peter closed his business in Memphis. Nine letters which appear after that date consist of exchanges with the War Department and Treasury concerned with clearing up minor discrepancies in accounts connected with military service. Other materials in the collection include typescripts of Peter's correspondence (1859-1871), a xerographic copy of a scrapbook, legal papers (1864-1865, undated), newspaper clippings (1863-1864), a picture of Eltinge in his officer's uniform, and a collection of miscellany (1865-1866). Researchers should be aware that the typescripts of the Eltinge correspondence reproduce only a portion of the letters for the years indicated and not always very accurately at that.

Most of the historically significant Eltinge material is contained in Eltinge's correspondence, particularly that dealing with the Civil War. Eltinge obtained a second lieutenant's commission in the fall of 1862 in the 156th New York Volunteer Infantry, a regiment recruited from Richmond County (Staten Island) and Ulster County, New York. The regiment saw service in several theaters and participated in General N. P. Banks' probe at and later seige of Port Hudson in 1863 and the Red River campaigns of 1863 and 1864 in the Department of the Gulf, as part of the 19th Corps relief force sent to defend Washington against Early, in Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley campain , as paw of Schofield's army which moved westward from the North Carolina coast to meet Sherman at Goldsboro, and on occupation duty in Lexington, Georgia, after the war in 1865. Peter Eltinge saw comparatively little action for all that campaigning, as either his regiment was held in reserve, his company detailed as a headquarters guard, or he himself in the hospital or in New York on a stint of recruiting duty which allowed him to convalesce. Peter was present, however, for practically all of Sheridan's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, during which his regiment suffered heavy casualties.

The composition of the Lord Division provides very different material than that of Peter Eltinge. That portion of George Lord's personal correspondence reposited at Duke (1862-1867) consists of only one folder of letters, while xerographic copies of other personal letters (1862-1868) are only slightly more numerous. By far the largest part of the division consists of the official records of the U. S. naval vessels Chillicothe (1863-1867, undated) Ozark (1864-1865), and Osage (1863, undated), and other naval records. Those records pertaining to the Chillicothe are both plentiful and comprehensive, taking in official correspondence (1863-1867, undated), the reports of the chief responsible commissioned and noncommissioned officers (1863-1865), orders (1862-1865 , undated), commercial papers (1864-1865, undated), and a miscellany collected by or pertaining to the Chillicothe (1863-1865 , undated). Other portions of the division include oaths of allegiance (1864-1865), printed material (1863-1865), a logbook of orders (1864), a collection of miscellany (1864-1865 , undated), captured Confederate papers (1862-1865), clippings (1861-1862, undated), and photographs of naval officers, ironclads, and gunboats (ca. 1861-1865, undated).

The papers of the Lord Division are marked by a number of gaps and omissions. The personal correspondence and the copies of personal correspondence contain relatively few items for the years 1862 and 1863. Although Lord wrote only sparingly to Peter Eltinge and his own family in Delaware, he apparently undertook an extensive correspondence with his fiancé and later bride (See Eltinge Division, letters, Edmund to Peter Eltinge, Jan. 9, 1864, and Lord Division, personal letters, copies, Mary to Edmund Eltinge, May 2, 19, 1864), while Mary presumably wrote with equal frequency. Practically none of these letters are represented in the collection, although the absence of Mary's early letters to George can be explained by their probable destruction in the sinking of the Covington, one of George's ships, in the spring of 1864.

The records of the Chillicothe, although by far the most numerous of the several ships' records in the collection, are not fully complete. There are several large and obvious gaps - occasionally months long - in the morning reports and other sections of the several sets of officers' reports. It should also be noted that the earliest examples of the Chillicothe's official correspondence do not involve Lord, but rather his predecessor, Lt. Joseph P. Couthony. Most of the various specialized sections of the ship's records are devoted to narrow subjects.

George Lord had been a cadet at the Naval Academy for a short time in the 1850s. He obtained a commission as a master's mate at Cincinnati in 1861, and participated in the Belmont, Ft. Henry, New Madrid (Island No. 10), and Red River campaigns and served afterwards on the lower Mississippi River. Lord's official correspondence as commander of the Chillicothe late in the war chiefly pertains to the regulation of trade on the river. Some of the naval records also cover George's service as commander of the "Ironclad Fleet in Ordinary" in the late part of 1865, while some personal letters (copies) deal with his brief career as a grocer in Memphis.

A general review of the information contained in the Eltinge and Lord Divisions follows. Please see appropriate cards in the subject catalog for a complete list of dates and references for topics mentioned.

Peter Eltinge's correspondence yields particularly good material on the battles in which he actively participated. Those actions included three sharp fights - Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek (letters, Sept. 22, Nov. 11, 1864) during Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Other, though less significant actions in which Peter saw a moderate amount of fighting were Banks' Red River Expedition of April-May, 1863 (letters, Apr.-May, 1863), and a large skirmish at Mansura, La. (letter of May 18-21, 1864), during Banks' Red River Expedition of 1864. Eltinge also wrote about the fighting of the Port Hudson campaign (letters of Mar. 6-July 23, 1863) the Red River Expedition of 1864 (letters of Mar. 19-June 7, 1864) including the battles of Pleasant Hill and Sabine Cross Roads, and Sherman's Campaign in the Carolinas (letters of Mar. 11-Apr. 20, 1865), although his company served as a headquarters guard for most of the Port Hudson campaign, his regiment was held in reserve for most of the important battles of the Red River campaign of 1864, and his division was used primarily in a supporting role in the Carolinas in 1865. His letters about the Red River campaign in 1864 do, however, contain considerable detail about the sinking of George Lord's vessel and his subsequent escape (various and scattered earlier letters also contain some personal information on Lord-not obtainable in the Lord Division itself). Eltinge serves solely as a commentator for other actions in which he played no part at all. These include the Yazoo expedition (letters of January 5, 11, 1865), Banks' probe toward Port Hudson (letters of March, 1863), Sherman's March to the Sea (letter of November 24, 1864), and the reactions to and controversy about the Confederate surrenders at Appomattox, Virginia and Durham Station, North Carolina (letter of April 14, 20, 1865).

Other excellent material on specific campaigns and battles can be found in the scrapbook and clippings contained in the Eltinge Division, particularly for the battle of Antietam (scrapbook, pp. 11, 12) and the Port Hudson campaign (clippings, July 14, 1863 and scrapbook, pp. 21-30). Much of the scrapbook consists of clippings taken from the New Paltz Times, which reprinted letter of area soldiers serving in one or another of the regiments recruited in that region of New York. One of the paper's correspondents was Charles J. Ackert, the paper's prewar editor, who had volunteered as a private soldier in the 156th New York Volunteers and after an early discharge became one of Peter Eltinge's correspondents.

Apart from the fighting itself, Eltinge wrote home about a wide variety of topics of a purely military nature, such as efforts to improvise cavalry in the Department of the Gulf and training troops through target practice and drill. More often, Eltinge wrote about routine problems, many of which were related to the management of personnel, especially as his regiment was chronically short of manpower. Related topics include: mobilization, recruiting and enlistment, alcoholism and military personnel , discipline, desertion, leaves and furloughs, discharges, and demobilization. Disease and battle casualties created a large number of vacancies among the officer ranks and inspired maneuvering for promotions among the surviving officers and enlisted men. Peter claimed that the colonel of the regiment often chose his own favorites for the vacancies and used the board of examination to eliminate unwanted candidates instead of the incompetents as the army had intended. From the other end of the personnel replacement system, Edmund Eltinge kept his son posted as to the effect conscription had on the male population at home and how local governments appropriated bounties to entice enough volunteers to meet their quotas.

The letters also cover some of the most mundane aspects of military service in the Civil War, including camp life, the military postal system, guard duty, foraging, food, medical and sanitary affairs, supplies and stores, surgeons, and chaplains. Due to frequent changes of station, pay became a problem, as the paymasters seldom caught up to the regiment in time. Additional information on some of these subjects may also be obtained from the scrapbook. Eltinge described some conditions at a few permanent and temporary barracks and quarters in the New York City area and at Key West, Florida. The clipping file contains a copy of an army newspaper, the Port Hudson [La.] Freemen (also referred to in scrapbook), edited by Charles J. Ackert.

Eltinge's letters and the scrapbook refer to the transportation of both men and supplies at various stages of the war. Most of the transportation was by water - ocean and river. One of the most significant of such references concerns the running aground of the 156th N.Y.'s transport, M. Sanford, on a reef near the Florida Keys. Peter's letters from Beaufort and Morehead City, North Carolina, during Sherman's Carolinas campaign touch on the transportation of supplies as he describes efforts to unload Chips in those ports in order to resupply Sherman's approaching forces.

Primarily because of his relationship with George Lord, Peter Eltinge's papers contain a number of references to naval affairs. Those references concerning naval operations on the Red and Mississippi rivers, prize money, and ironclads came chiefly from Peter's letters, while the clippings and oversize folder contain material on blockading operations as well, including the capture of Confederate blockade runners by Union gunboats.

Other topics associated with the military side of the Civil War in the Eltinge Division include the confiscation of property in the U.S. Army, fraternization of Southerners with Union soldiers in Louisiana, Confederate guerrilla activity in the lower Mississippi River Valley, conscription and desertion in the Confederate army, Union soldiers exercising their suffrage rights, 120th N.Y. Inf. troops held as prisoners by the Confederates, and the exchange of prisoners of war. Union commanders discussed include Generals Nathaniel P. Banks, Phillip Sheridan, William T. Sherman, Charles P. Stone (of Ball's Bluff, in connection with a visit he made to Banks' headquarters in 1863), and Albert Lee, the cavalry commander during Banks' Red River Expedition of 1864.

Peter Eltinge mentioned a number of Union Army regiments. In addition to his own, the 156th New York Volunteer Infantry, which was also known as the "Mountain Legion" (letters, clippings, scrapbook, oversize folder), his papers also make prominent mention of the 20th (scrapbook) and the 120th New York Volunteer Infantry (letter), regiments from his home county which served in the army of the Potomac. Other regiments mentioned include the 90th New York Volunteer Infantry, which served as a garrison at Key West, and the 31st Massachusetts and 176th New York Volunteer Infantry, both of which served in the Department of the Gulf. Edmund Eltinge wrote to Peter about conditions in the Army of the Potomac as a whole with regard to discipline and temperance.

During the Port Hudson campaign, Peter Eltinge had a chance to observe two black Union regiments in action, the 1st and 3d Louisiana Native Guard, the men of which impressed him with their bearing and courage. Eltinge wrote favorably of using blacks in military service, but he disapproved of northern states attempting to recruit southern blacks to meet conscription quotas. Soldiers' letters printed in Eltinge's hometown newspaper and preserved in the scrapbook also spoke well of the black soldier. Members of Peter's regiment sought commissions in black regiments as a way to obtain higher rank. Eltinge himself hired a black, Fulton Cox, as a servant from an army hiring agency near Washington, and he kept him in his employ after the war (letters, 1865; legal papers, 1864; scrapbook).

The Eltinge Division material contains a fair amount of information on non-military aspects of the Civil War as well, many of which deal with economic or racial questions. The banking background of the Eltinge family gave Peter a sharp eye for the economic landscape in the locales he passed through, and father and son exchanged observations on hot the economy of New York and the Union at large affected the investments Peter arranged for his father to make with the portion of his salary he sent home. Some of the other specific economic topics discussed include banks and banking in New York, economic conditions in Louisiana and Arkansas, wages in southern states, and cotton trade and smuggling during the war. Peter also took note of how blacks generally fared during the Civil War, and how they were perceived by white Union soldiers, and he commented on a particularly prosperous black at Key West who appeared to produce most of the fresh fruit and vegetables on the island.

Peter Eltinge also provided more general descriptions of areas he served in and how the war altered them. These locales included New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Morehead City, Beaufort, and Goldsboro, North Carolina, and Key West, Florida.

Scattered topics discussed briefly include censorship of newspapers in New Orleans, the celebration of Thanksgiving Day with dinner sent from New York to the 156th in the field, and reaction to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the capture of Jefferson Davis. In the division there are also a copy of a Unionist newspaper, the New South, published at Port Royal, South Carolina, and a letter published in a newspaper and reproduced in the scrapbook which is a good example of an amateur attempt at propaganda.

Prior to the war, Peter Eltinge worked as a clerk in two different firms in New York City. After working hours, he found time to participate in a choral group, and he attended several church services on Sundays, sampling the preaching Of several different ministers in the city, including Henry Ward Beecher and William Milburn, "the blind preacher". Partly at the behest of one of his employers, Peter also taught Sunday school in poor neighborhoods of the city. He had earlier been active in a temperance education society for young people, "The Band of Hope," when he had lived in New Paltz, and after moving to New York - and even after joining the army - he remained vitally interested in the temperance movement both back at home and on the state and national level. Peter inquired about and commented on the activities of the society in New Paltz, read copies of the Prohibitionist, a periodical published in Albany, and exchanged notes with his father and family about prominent temperance and prohibitionist figures like John B. Gough, Henry Ward Beecher, and John Pinchard Jowett, some of whom came to New Paltz to lecture, and others of whom Peter heard in New York.

Peter Eltinge also had a strong prewar interest in politics which he retained throughout his military service and after the war. He felt opposed to Democrats of whatever persuasion at the state and local level, most notably Fernando Wood, mayor of New York City, but he was also bitterly opposed to the abolitionists, as he preferred the non-extension, non-interference positions with regard to slavery. He judged himself to be ''a conservative Union man," not a Republican as his father was. Peter watched the Presidential election campaign and secession crisis of 1860 with an interest relatively devoid of partisanship, although he voted for Lincoln. He attended a speech given by William H. Seward in New York City, November 2, 1860, in which Seward repeated sentiments similar to those of the earlier famous "irrepressible conflict" address. During the war he watched northern friends serving as Treasury officials at New Orleans form a campaign committee for Michael Decker Hahn, a German émigré who became the Republican wartime governor of Louisiana. Edmund Eltinge continued to write to Peter about the shifts in New York State politics, especially the election of 1863 and the defeat of the Copperheads. The elder Eltinge also reported rumors of Lincoln's cabinet crisis in December, 1862, while Peter sent back rumors on the future assignment of the regiment. Among the other prominent political events and figures that appear in the Eltinge correspondence are the New York City elections of 1859, the presidential election of 1864, the Democratic convention at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1860, Abraham Lincoln, George B. McClellan, Horatio Seymour, and John C. Fremont.

The conservative temper of Peter Eltinge's political beliefs resurfaced not long after the war, while he was serving on occupation duty in Lexington (Oglethorpe Co.), Georgia. He intervened on the side of the planters to quell discontent among newly freed Negro agricultural laborers, and he expressed himself opposed to extending the suffrage to blacks and was suspicious of the motives of Wendell Phillips for his advocacy of giving freedmen the vote. Peter at first thought that the political integration of Georgia under Presidential Reconstruction went rather well. During his stay there and in subsequent correspondence with people he had met there, he observed the revival of politics, the holding of new elections, a state constitutional convention, and even the observance of the Fourth of July in 1865. Apart from keeping law and order until civil authorities could reassume power, Eltinge's chief duty was the administration of oaths of allegiance to the inhabitants, most of whom took the oath readily. As 1865 ended, however, Peter felt that Georgia still had not met all qualifications for readmission to full statehood, and opinion for which a white Georgian correspondent excoriated him. As he had in the Civil War, Peter reported on the economic conditions prevailing in Georgia, especially the confusion in prices due to a lack of faith in Federal paper currency.

Peter Eltinge's attitudes had changed only a little by the time he and George Lord went to Memphis the next year to establish their grocery business. He noted that there was a lot of bitterness in Tennessee over the management of Reconstruction by Congress, and he himself thought Congress was acting too harshly, but he reported voting a straight Radical ticket that fall. Race relations in Memphis were strained, and a race riot involving hundreds broke out May 1, 1866.

Most of Peter's letters from Memphis dealt with economic matters. Eltinge and Lord were two of many northerners trying to make a quick gain in the recovering region. Business activity seemed to rise and fall quickly, and Peter complained to his father that the banks were too cautious in making loans to businesses. He wrote home often of their fortunes and prospects with the grocery, which did most of its business selling provisions to large plantations, but Eltinge was eager to invest in a more lucrative venture. He first considered wholesaling tobacco in the area before finally deciding to buy an interest in a cotton crop. A number of Union officers, including other former officers of the 156th New York Volunteers, had established themselves as labor contractors to cotton plantation owners in return for a share of the cotton crop. Peter, with the help of substantial loans from his father, took a fractional share of a cotton crop in Arkansas, but the venture turned out badly, as changing marketing patterns and bad weather drove down prices and held down both the quality and yield of the crop Peter had invested in. Eltinge had begun thinking of investing in cotton growing during the war and had discussed cotton prices in a letter written in Georgia. Once in Memphis, his letters became increasingly filled with discussions of cotton prices, growing, ginning, trading, and commission merchants in the area of Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee, and of agricultural labor, both black and undesignated, in those states. Scattered topics dealing with Eltinge's activity in Memphis include descriptions of the city itself, and discussions of the tobacco trade in the area and the availability of fire insurance.

Other items, unrelated to business, which came up during Eltinge's residence in Memphis include an explanation of barbecue cookery to his relatives, mention of a Fourth of July celebration held by Unionists living in town, and an old regimental comrade's report of the effect of the 1866 elections in Illinois.

Unlike Eltinge, George Lord saw a considerable amount of battle early in the war, only to spend most of the rest of the conflict in more sedentary duty. References in newspaper clippings to Lord and the ships he served on, the U.S.S. Tyler and the U.S.S. Benton, give some glimpse of his involvement in the Belmont, Mo., Ft. Henry, and the New Madrid-Island No. 10 campaigns. In the last of these, he led the boarding party which captured and saved from destruction the General Bragg. After having participated in some of the initial probing during the Vicksburg campaign (such as the Yazoo expedition), Lord's vessel, the "tin-clad" U.S.S. Covington, took part in a small expedition up the White River in Arkansas. During the White River expedition, Lord had his ship tow the burning Des Arc, a private cargo ship, away from the supply fleet.

Lord became involved in the Red River campaign of 1864 after the fall in the water level of that stream temporarily stranded the ironclads of the Mississippi Squadron at Alexandria, Louisiana. The Covington and other light draft vessels were then ordered up the Red River in support. The Covington, which along with the U.S.S. Signal, was convoying the John Warner when it was ambushed by artillery and infantry of the Confederate army. All three vessels were destroyed, and Lord's crew had to disperse to avoid capture. Lord himself made it to Alexandria, where on May 7 he was assigned as the executive officer of the ironclad U.S.S. Chillicothe, of which he became captain later in the month. The most graphic account of Lord's experiences on the Red River contained within the Lord Division itself may be found in a letter to his father-in-law of May 24, 1864 (personal letter, copy). An equally graphic account may be found in one of Peter Eltinge's letters home, which is filed in the division devoted to his papers. Other valuable letters on this episode are those of Lord's wife, who had gone out to visit George shortly before he was ordered up the Red River and who waited anxiously for news after learning that the Covington had been sunk (personal letters, copies, May 9, 17, 19, 1864). Scattered routine letters relating to the loss of the Covington may also be found in various sections of the division (letters, personal letters, copies, records of the Chillicothe, official correspondence).

After the Red River campaign of 1864, Lord's ship rarely saw action. Ship's personnel occasionally went ashore to augment sorties by the army, such as at Woodville, Mississippi, in October, 1864 (records of the Chillicothe; official letters), or to carry out small landing actions or patrols. The Chillicothe, which suffered from the lack of a long-postponed overhaul, was stationed at Ft. Adams, Mississippi, with the primary missions of regulating trade, checking the operations of local Confederate regulars and guerrillas and preventing the passage of troops and supplies over the Mississippi to the army opposing Sherman in Georgia. The printed material among the Lord papers includes an announcement of the capture of Ft. Gaines during the combined army-navy campaign at Mobile Bay in August, 1864, the only other significant campaign mentioned.

Lord put in claims for prize money for his role in the salvaging of the Des Arc and the capture of the General Bragg, claims which continued to generate correspondence even after his death (personal letters, copies; records of the Chillicothe, official correspondence). Among the more notable participants in that exchange were Admiral Charles H. Davis and S. J. W. Tabor, the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.

Apart from active operations and prize money, Lord's papers are rich in material on various and detailed aspects of American naval life and science in the period of the Civil War. This is primarily due to the fairly comprehensive nature of the collection of the U.S.S. Chillicothe's records, with additional material coming from the miscellaneous papers associated with that same ship, the smaller collections from the Osage and Ozark, and Lord's personal correspondence. The distinctly naval topics raised include some details of ship life, training requirements for the crew, "watch bills" - or lists assigning men to combat stations and duties in case of fire -, orders for the pattern of signals to identify transports, intelligence reports exchanged with other army and naval units on Confederate army and guerrilla activity, precautions to be taken against submarine mines (then known as torpedoes), lists of the various firearms available to the ship's crew (and instructions on the use of the Sharps rifle), regular reports by the Chillicothe's chief gunner on the condition and supply of munitions and ammunition, and a letter from a fellow officer serving on blockade duty on the Atlantic coast Complete and partial lists of vessels in the Mississippi Squadron can be found in printed materials and among copies of personal letters. While the Lord material necessarily deals with gunboats and ironclads on a continuing basis, specific references to vessels which can be placed in either category have been so cataloged. Note should also be made of Lord's postwar duty of directing the demobilization of the "Ironclad Fleet in Ordinary" at Mound City, Illinois.

The naval material also covers such logistical topics as food, provisioning, ordnance and ordnance stores, fuel (primarily coal), and the transportation of supplies and stores. Many of these are represented in departmental reports of supplies on hand or in correspondence and commercial papers exchanged with naval depots and private contractors. Some of the responsible officers who filed related reports include the engineer, who kept records on the condition of the power plant (records of the Chillicothe, official letters, engineer's monthly returns; records of the Ozark), the yeoman, who was responsible for filing miscellaneous reports on personnel and supply matters (records of the Chillicothe, yeoman's reports), and the carpenter, who was in charge of the maintenance of the wooden structure of the ship and insuring that adequate repair materials were kept in stock.

A number of other topics deal with personnel management, including recruiting, promotions, leaves and furloughs, pay and allowances, and discharges. The question of discharges became a delicate one as the war came to an end and the navy demobilized at a somewhat slower pace than the army. The maintenance of discipline and morale became difficult at the unpleasant station of Mound City, where desertion grew more frequent. The records of several courts-martial can be found among the official letters and miscellany of the records of the Chillicothe, and there are references to alcoholism and disciplinary problems in other categories of the Lord Division, most notably in the Chillicothe's Master at Arms reports of the members of crew under punishment. A printed circular promulgated by Admiral David Dixon Porter shortly after he assumed command of the Mississippi Squadron directly addressed the problem of morale. Two of the topics Porter discussed in that circular included naval hospitals and health conditions, both of which he promised to improve for the sake of morale and to keep the men fit for duty. Climate and crowded conditions made service on the lower Mississippi and at Mound City relatively unhealthy, as may be seen in the surgeon's reports (for medical and sanitary affairs) and in Lord's own personal letters (copies: for health conditions). "Fever" was the most common complaint, although dysentery was occasionally a problem. One of the Chillicothe's officers applied to Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles for permission to resign due to chronic illness, a request Lord duly approved and forwarded.

Among the more important naval figures whose letters recur in the Lord papers are Admiral Porter, Admiral Samuel Phillip Lee, Porter's successor in command of the Mississippi Squadron, and Lieutenant Commander E. Y. McCauley, one of Lord's immediate superiors in the squadron who later became an admiral.

Riverine operations and the regulation of trade brought Lord and the Mississippi Squadron into frequent contact with governmental and military agencies, both friendly and hostile, which line officers of the navy seldom had to deal with otherwise. Since the army had initially organized the Mississippi Squadron, and the squadron, even after its transfer to the navy, obtained still more men from the army when the government permitted experienced seamen and rivermen to transfer services, there are some items among Lord's papers which reflect on matters of personnel management in the army. The navy, particularly during operations such as Banks' Red River expeditions, assumed most of the burden of transporting the army's supplies and stores. In one instance, the navy transported cotton bales for the construction of field fortifications. A shore party manning an artillery battery during an operation near Woodville, Mississippi, in October, 1864, ran into some difficulty and ultimately surrendered to Confederate forces when the 3d U.S. Colored Cavalry unexpectedly fired on the sailors. Official letters of the Chillicothe include a couple of complaints by Southern civilians about confiscation of property by the Union army.

The Mississippi Squadron worked closely with the army to contain regular and irregular forces of Confederates, and it worked with the army and the Treasury Department to insure that commerce, particularly cotton trade, was conducted in a manner which did not unduly aid the Confederate war effort. The official correspondence of the Chillicothe reflects the exchange of military intelligence between the two services on guerrilla activity. Such reports included one on a team of saboteurs operating against the ships and warehouses along the river (printed material). The Chillicothe papers contain some copies of captured Confederate documents which relate primarily to the Department (or District) of Southern Mississippi and Eastern Louisiana, also referred to as the District of Homochitto (after a local river) and "Scott's Command," (after Col. John S. Scott, who headed that jurisdiction in 1864). Orders from that headquarters bearing the name of C.S.A. General George B. Hodge, one filed among the Chillicothe's official correspondence and another among that ship's orders, indicate what the Confederate regulations were on commerce passing through Union lines. Two other items, filed separately as "Confederate Papers, 1862-1863," included an enlistment contract which promised a furlough to members of the 9th South Carolina Volunteers and a letter from a member of the Texas Legion at Vicksburg describing bombardments and health conditions while the city was under sedge. Two of Lord's personal letters to his in-laws describe how rapidly the flow of Confederate deserters into Union lines grew in the last month of the war. A single official letter deals with the attempt of a Southerner to send a letter through a Union naval officer to a Confederate soldier held as a prisoner in the north.

Both the navy and the army in the Mississippi Valley found themselves in the role of regulator of trade during the last half of the war. The Union government, particularly the Treasury Department, changed policies and procedures often and put military officials, who sought both to enforce regulations and end the war as quickly as possible, in a difficult position with Southern civilians. A clipping from a Memphis newspaper noted that Union General N.P. Buford had 40 cotton traders arrested, although they had apparently acted in conformity with recently published regulations. Military authorities supervised the conduct of cotton sales and the transportation and importation of finished goods entering the interior. As changes in regulation occurred, the notifications of the changes sometimes arrived accompanied by explanations provided by the Treasury Department.

The Chillicothe's official letters include a long circular on the cotton trade with endorsements by Secretary William Fessenden and President Lincoln, among others. Other, angry letters from army and navy commanders periodically urged stricter suppression of black market trade in cotton. The official letters and commercial papers include numerous applications and certificates for permission to buy, sell, or transport cotton and finished goods. The logbook of orders in the Lord Division actually contains as many entries about the shipment of cotton and supplies as it does about the receipt of orders. One series of official letters (and depositions filed with the official letters) deals with a British subject, B.H. Clark, who swindled sellers of cotton and was brought to trial.

Lord's remaining time while stationed on the lower Mississippi was also spent taking renewals of the oath of allegiance of residents of the South, some of whom affirmed that they had never aided the rebel cause, although most takers of the oath admitted having supported the Confederate government in some way. Lord noted the enthusiasm with which the people in the Mississippi River Valley greeted the generous terms of Lincoln's amnesty proclamation of December 8, 1863.

In contrast to his brother-in-law, George Lord revealed no strong interest in politics in his letters. The election of 1864 intrudes into his papers only when a political argument among some of his men led to a breach of discipline requiring Lord's attention. A correspondent from Illinois in 1865 mentioned that opposition to Negro suffrage had affected politics in that state (letters). Lincoln's name rarely appears. Exceptions include official and unofficial printed circulars dealing with his assassination. Similarly, Jefferson Davis surfaces for serious attention only in orders concerned with his capture at the end of the war.

Lord appeared to be equally as taciturn on the subject of his own feelings about blacks as he was on politics. Some of his official correspondence acknowledged the help that local "contrabands" had offered in the gathering of intelligence. Otherwise, his main concern about "contrabands" was that he followed proper procedures in accepting them into Union control and in reporting them to higher headquarters. He demonstrated a somewhat greater, if still dispassionate, interest in the operational details of Negro agricultural labor in the Union-controlled areas of Mississippi and Arkansas. He noted that by 1864 local planters had shifted over to paying blacks a low, fixed monthly wage, and that they claimed using the cheap freed labor to be less burdensome that the responsibilities of slaveholding. Lord's few other comments on the economics of wartime cotton production include a report that some planters had begun to lease their land rather than work it themselves (personal letters, copies). Lord's wife, Mary, during her stay at Memphis while George was on the Red River expedition, visited and briefly described a camp of contrabands named "Prichettsville" in a letter to her parents (personal letters, copies).

George Lord's few letters from Memphis (personal letters, copies) offer a somewhat different picture of prospects there than can be found in Peter Eltinge's letters. Lord was more cautious than his brother-in-law, whom he thought tended to be too trusting and optimistic when entering into business deals. Lord did not join Peter in speculating in cotton crops, although he had been more receptive to the proposal to wholesale tobacco. He offered a few observations on business trends and opportunities in Memphis, but he wanted to refrain from aggressive investment or speculation until the prize money he anticipated to receive would give him ready capital.

Obituaries of George Lord may be found in newspapers filed in the oversize folder in Picture Cabinet II. One of the papers, the Republican Memphis Daily Post of August 17, 1866, also contains articles on the Republican Party convention of 1866 held in Philadelphia and on a convention of blacks held in Nashville, Tennessee, where the participants primarily discussed ways of providing freedmen with an education.

Among the most interesting Items in the Lord Division is a collection of photographs. Most are of ships of the Mississippi Squadron on which Lord served or which formed part of the force which went up the Red River in 1864. Most of the photographs are sepia in color and appear as paper prints, although there are a few modern transparencies of ships pictured elsewhere in this and other collections. The ships represented include the U.S.S. Benton, Blackhawk, Chillicothe, Covington, Mound City, Neosho, Ouachita, Queen City, and Tyler. There is a picture of a large portion of the Mississippi Squadron on the Red River expedition of 1864 and another of the C.S.S. Tennessee. One transparency, taken from a lithograph not contained in this collection, is of the naval battle of Hampton Roads between the U.S.S. Monitor and the Merrimac (C.S.S. Virginia). Important naval personages portrayed include Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter and Lt. Cmdr. (later Admiral) James Augustus Greer, the commander of the Benton. There are also some modern copies of a portrait photograph of George Lord in a naval uniform, three 8 x 10 in. prints and one 4 x 5 in. negative.

Among the other senior officers Lord forwarded letters or reports to were Mai, Gen. Edward R. S. Canby, Banks' successor as commander of the Department of the Gulf, and Brig. Gen. John W. Davidson, then commanding the District of Natchez.

While Eltinge and Lord were in military service, the Eltinge family kept them informed about activities at home. Several of Peter's sisters became involved in various charity fairs in the New York City area which were held to raise money for the United States Sanitary Commission (Eltinge division, scrapbook, letters). Similar activities were instituted in Boston, where another organization sought to raise money for a sailors' home (Lord division, printed material).

Peter's sisters led a fairly active life during the war. At one time or another, he had sisters residing in New York City, Camden, Delaware, and Washington, D.C., while Edmund Eltinge occasionally stopped in to see his daughters in Washington and New York. As a result, Peter received descriptions of war-time Washington, as well as reports of the burning of Ford's Theater in December, 1862, an exhibit of the expeditionary clothing worn by the arctic explorer Elisha Kent Kane and lectures at the Smithsonian Institution, and visits to art exhibitions, including one by landscape artist Francis Regis Gignoux, at art galleries in New York City.

Peter's father occasionally gave him some indication of how the economy back home fared during the war - what were the prospects for the crops on the family farm, about Edmund Eltinge's own involvement in getting the Wallkill River Valley Railroad - a spur line off the Erie Railroad - pushed through the New Paltz area (letters, scrapbook), what local wages were, what interest rates were available, and what the price of various securities and commodities were like. Other incidental information relative to economic conditions in the North may be gleaned from articles which form part of the newspaper clippings found in the Lord Division. Information found there includes exchange market quotations on precious metals and commodities. Extraneous pieces of correspondence in 1865-1866 mention the venture of one of Peter's friends, A, H. Gough, in the oil industry of Pennsylvania and Ohio.

Other interesting bits of information sent to rather than from New Paltz include Peter's commentary on the notoriety surrounding the celebrated "Diamond Wedding" of Estaban de Oviedo and Frances Bartlett in New York City in 1859, and Mary Lord's anecdote as to how her hosts in Memphis in 1864 had made a special effort to show her one of the few Steinway pianos then in that area,

Disease recurs as a topic in both divisions, Although the Lord Division contains the Chillicothe's surgeon's file, most of the descriptions of the illnesses on board that ship were fairly general, Peter Eltinge's wartime letters contain more specific references to the incidence of diphtheria, yellow fever, and tuberculosis, and the scrapbook in that division mentions instances of the latter two diseases, George Lord once wrote to his father-in-law about an outbreak of smallpox in Baltimore in February, 1864, and expressed concern about his family in Delaware, Although Peter Eltinge noted several waves of cholera as they passed through Memphis in 1866, and George Lord experienced at least one bout of some sort of fever prior to his death, his obituary listed only "congestion of the stomach" as the cause. Peter himself died of tuberculosis, as did several other members of his family (scrapbook).

Among the various items to be found in the clippings in the scrapbook in the Eltinge Division are articles written by Civil War humorist Artemus Ward (Charles Farrar Browne), an account of winemaking and grape cultivation in Nets Jersey, a history and genealogy of the Eltinge family and its settlement in New Paltz, a commentary by Charles J. Ackert that wartime New Orleans tended to treat the Sabbath as just another day for activity and enterprise, and a portrait (wood engraving) of Winfield Scott. Newspapers found in the Oversize Folder, in addition to those already mentioned, include copies of the New Paltz Times and The Southern Ulster Times.

There are a number of scattered items in the Lord Division connected with the Civil War. They include an order limiting the correspondence of naval personnel with members of the press (records of the Chillocothe, orders), letters announcing the formation of a veterans' organization known as the Mississippi Squadron Association (personal letter), a piece of stationery bearing the Confederate flag (Confederate papers), and a critical evaluation of General Banks by Mary Lord after George had been ordered up the Red River (personal letters, copies).

1 result in this collection
Collection

Eltinge-Lord Family papers (Peter Eltinge papers), 1856-1871 7 Linear Feet — 14 boxes — 2,245 Items

Online
from a fellow officer serving on blockade duty on the Atlantic coast Complete and partial lists of
stages of the war. Most of the transportation was by water - ocean and river. One of the most significant