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include informational brochures, "FAQs," project proposals, executive summaries for publications, citation
lists, and flyers. There are also teaching guides and conference programs, among other materials.

Each packet contains materials on a specific topic or written by one author which were gathered by an individual or organization and sent to the Advisory Board for its consideration. Typical items include informational brochures, "FAQs," project proposals, executive summaries for publications, citation lists, and flyers. There are also teaching guides and conference programs, among other materials.

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Southern Lesbian-Feminist Activist Herstory Project, 2011-2015 10 Gigabytes — MP3, WAV, WMA, PDF, and DOC files. — 0.3 Linear Feet — 1 box

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Processed by Craig Breaden, August 2017 and May 2019. Accessions described in this collection guide
information, consult the copyright section of the Citations, Permissions and Copyright page of the David M
Forty-four digital audio oral history interviews documenting lesbian feminist activism in the South focused on the period 1968-1994.

Forty-four digital audio oral history interviews created by Charlene Ball, Kate Ellison, Barbara Esrig, Barbara Ester, Merril Mushroom, and Rose Norman, documenting lesbian feminist activism in the South focused on the period 1968-1994. The interviews were created in 2011-2015, and are accompanied by digital notes and/or transcripts, which often contain photographs.

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Phillip Rhodes papers, 1957-2008 and undated 60 Linear Feet — 60 linear feet

Humanities, the Rockefeller Fund for Music, a citation and award from the American Academy of Arts and
Accessions included in this collection guide: 2006-0014; 2007-0061; 2008-0185.
North Carolina born and raised composer, Duke alumnus, and composer-in-residence and professor at Carleton College. Collection comprises primarily scores, music sketches, recordings, professional files, and correspondence that follow the development of Rhodes' compositional career. Includes published compositions and unpublished student works for both vocal and instrumental ensembles, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, and other publicity related items from performances of his music.

Collection comprises primarily scores, professional files, and correspondence that follow the development of Rhodes' compositional career. Name and Correspondence files consists mainly of correspondence between Rhodes and a variety of professional organizations, but also includes Rhodes' handwritten notes, some publicity materials, and other administrative documents. Personal Files includes unpublished works and music sketches from Rhodes' time as a student at both Duke and Yale, as well as some correspondence and biographical publicity materials more generally related to his career. Events and Programs consists of assorted concert programs from performances of Rhodes' music. Rhodes' music has been divided into four series based on genre: Chamber and Solo Instrumental Works, Choral and Solo Vocal Works, Operas and Oratorios, Orchestral and Wind Ensemble Works. The series include music sketches, drafts, revisions, original manuscripts, master sheets, piano reductions, published scores, conductor's scores, and when noted, instrumental parts.

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Processed by Luo Zhou and Matthew Farrell, 2013-2019. Accessions described in this collection guide
The interviews described in this collection guide are arranged geographically by Province and
this collection guide while additional text documents and transcripts can be accessed clicking links
The Memory Project Oral History collection comprises digital video recordings and written supporting documentation of interviews spanning 2009 to 2016. The interviews were conducted by filmmakers associated with the Work Station, a film studio run by Wu Wenguang in Caochangdi, Beijing, China. Memory Project interviews were conducted with Chinese people about mid-20th century rural life, primarily experiences during the Great Famine (1958-1961), but also the Land Reform and Collectivization (1949-1953), the Great Leap Forward (1958-1960), the Four Cleanups Movement (1964), and the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Wu's studio in suburban Beijing, known as the Work Station, is the home for this project. More than 150 young filmmakers have joined the project, and since 2010 they have visited 246 villages in 20 provinces and interviewed more than 1,100 elderly villagers. These filmmakers, many of whom returned to their families' rural hometowns, developed new intergenerational relationships with elderly relatives. During the process of interviewing the villagers, they reconciled the official history taught in schools with each family's experiences.

The Memory Project Oral History collection comprises digital video recordings and written supporting documentation of interviews spanning 2009 to 2016. The interviews were conducted by filmmakers associated with the Work Station, a film studio run by Wu Wenguang in Caochangdi, Beijing, China. Memory Project interviews were conducted with Chinese people about mid-20th century rural life, primarily experiences during the Great Famine (1958-1961), but also the Land Reform and Collectivization (1949-1953), the Great Leap Forward (1958-1960), the Four Cleanups Movement (1964), and the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). The interviews show regional variations in famine experiences and rural culture. They add intimate detail and humanity to the story of the deaths and starvation of millions of Chinese, providing a unique perspective on the unofficial history of the Great Famine.

Due to the geographic scope and rural focus of the Memory Project, the interviews are frequently conducted in regional dialects. In many cases, the filmmakers provided Chinese language transcripts. Many recordings are also accompanied by prose reflections written by the filmmakers, the text of which originally came from the Work Station blog or email communication between filmmakers. The notes and blogs written by the filmmakers and the interview footage preserve the fading memories of people who lived through the Great Famine, ensuring that their stories are not forgotten.

The interviews described in this collection guide are arranged geographically by Province and Village. While multiple filmmakers may have worked in a single province, in most cases, only a single filmmaker traveled to each village represented. Approximately 225, or one quarter, of the interviews and supporting documentation are described as of August 2019. These interviews include those conducted by Wu Wenguang 吴文光, Zhang Mengqi 章梦奇, Zou Xueping 邹雪平, Li Xinmin 李新民, Jia Nannan 贾楠楠, Luo Bing 罗兵, Lin Tao 林涛, Zhang Ping 张苹, Li Yushan 李雨珊, Guo Zhihua 郭志华 and Qu Yufeng 屈玉凤. Other interviews will be published incrementally as each filmmaker's material is arranged and described.

Most materials are available in Chinese. A smaller number of interview transcripts have been translated into English. Those interviews that have English translations are noted in the individual interview description below. All digital files are available online. Videos may be played directly through this collection guide while additional text documents and transcripts can be accessed clicking links next to the embedded videos in this collection guide, or directly via Duke Digital Collections at https://repository.duke.edu/dc/memoryproject/.

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Unit Citation with one cluster, Honorary Knight Commander of the Military Division of the Most
For the guide to the microfilm in accession # 1999-0167, see Japan and America, c1930-1955: The
Robert Eichelberger (1886-1961) commanded the Eighth United States Army in the Southwest Pacific during World War II and the Occupation of Japan. Collection includes personal and official correspondence, including letters written while Eichelberger was a student at the U.S. Military Academy, 1905, and letters from a number of Japanese concerning Eichelberger's part in the occupation, 1948. Other materials contain information on military intelligence in the Philippine Department, 1920-1921; on the Siberian Expedition; reports on operations which Eichelberger commanded during World War II, and on the planned invasion of Japan. The collection also contains correspondence from Eichelberger's work on the North Carolina Ports Authority, 1957-1960, as well as diaries, interviews, statements and speeches, photograph albums and West Point yearbooks.

The Eichelberger Papers span the period 1728 to 1998, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1942 and 1949. The papers contain diaries, correspondence, military papers, writings and speeches, pictures, scrapbooks, printed material, clippings, memorabilia, and audiovisual material chiefly relating to Eichelberger's military career. Prominently highlighted is his participation as a member of the American Expeditionary Forces in Siberia (1918-1920); the military campaigns he led in New Guinea and the Philippines during World War II (1942-1945); and the post-war period when he commanded all ground occupation troops in Japan (1945-1948). Additionally, there are several photographs of Winston Churchill, who came to Fort Jackson, S.C. in 1942, to view the 77th Army Division commanded by Eichelberger. There are also several photographs of Eleanor Roosevelt, when she came to Australia in 1943 to visit the troops, and several of Douglas MacArthur. The bulk of the personal correspondence (1942-1945) was written by Eichelberger to his wife, Emma Gudger Eichelberger, in which he described the fighting in the Pacific as well as the difficulties of jungle life. In dictations after the war, Eichelberger reflected upon his military career and various people, including Generals Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Robert C. Richardson.

Eichelberger's military career is represented in all series throughout the collection. In particular, the dictations Eichelberger made after the war are located in the Writings and Speeches Series. The extensive Pictures Series documents the events of his career during 1918 to 1920, and during World War II and the post-war period. Eichelberger's memoir, "Our Bloody Jungle Road to Tokyo", serialized in the Saturday Evening Post in 1949, is located in the Oversize Printed Material Series.

Related materials include a microfilm (2 reels) of the 1949 Ph.D. dissertation written at Syracuse University by Duke Professor Ralph Braibanti, "The Occupation of Japan," which contains information about Eichelberger while he was commander of the occupation troops in Japan after World War II. This microfilm is located in Perkins Library Microforms Department. The Duke University Special Collections Library also has the papers of Eichelberger's father George M. Eichelberger, a lawyer from Urbana, Ohio. Another related collection is the Westall Family Papers. Mrs. James M. Westall (Virginia Cooper Westall), was Eichelberger's longtime secretary in Asheville, N.C. There are over a hundred letters of Eichelberger's and other related materials in this collection which document the Eichelbergers' business and social affairs from the 1950s until his death.

Other related works include a compilation of Eichelberger's letters to his wife entitled Dear Miss Em: General Eichelberger's War in the Pacific, 1942-1945, (Westpoint, Conn., 1972) edited by Jay Luvaas. Other works about Eichelberger include Forged by Fire: General Robert L. Eichelberger and the Pacific War (Columbia, S.C., 1987) by John F. Shortal, and "A 'Near Great' General: the Life and Career of Robert L. Eichelberger," a Duke University 1991 Ph.D. dissertation, by Paul Chwialkowski.

The addition (acc# 1999-0167) (83 reels; dated 1998) consists of negative microfilm reels of the "Japan and America" microfilm series, photographed from the Eichelberger Papers.

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Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize photography collection, 1996-2019 10 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 91 prints — 36 Gigabytes — 4 digital video files in .mov, .wmv, and mp4 formats (Cozart collection)

Accession(s) represented in this collection guide: 2010-0133, 2011-0054, 2011-0201, 2019-0107, and
Copyright Act, please consult https://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/research/citations-and-permissions.
The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection houses the work of seven documentary artists, all recipients of the Lange-Taylor Prize: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos. Their portfolios total 91 color and black-and-white photographic prints, some of them image collages, and four oral history digital videos. The projects examine a wide variety of topics: the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in mountainous villages of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics institutionalized in the U.S.; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection comprises the work of seven documentary artists: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos, totaling 91 color and black-and-white prints and four digital video files of interviews, all awarded the Lange-Taylor Prize.

The projects examine the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in the mountains of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families who have settled in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Several of the collections include paper copies of the artist's statements regarding their projects.

Some of these documentary artist's work was displayed as part of "Hand and Eye: Fifteen Years of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize," an exhibit at the Center for Documentary Studies from September 19, 2005-January 8, 2006.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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this guide and on the H. Lee Waters Digital Collection page: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections
/rubenstein/research/citations-and-permissions.
Born in Caroleen, North Carolina in 1902, studio photographer Herbert Lee Waters supplemented his income from 1936 to 1942 by traveling across North Carolina and parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and South Carolina to film the people of small communities. He collaborated with local movie theaters to screen his films, which he called Movies of Local People. As a filmmaker, Waters produced 252 films across 118 communities. The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and primarily comprises 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The collection contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters' film making, including: a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters to record financial and business information during the filming of Movies of Local People; photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; copy of a 2005 master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and comprises primarily 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters between 1936 and 1942 as he traveled across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia filming the residents of small towns. Waters aimed to film as many residents in each community as possible, often setting up his camera at the main intersection in town to capture community members walking downtown. Waters also typically filmed school children entering or leaving school and workers arriving to or departing from mills, plants, and factories. Waters often included trick shots to engage his audience, such as trains moving backwards or children jumping in reverse. Although the films are dominated by shots of crowds and individual faces, Waters also captured a wide variety of activities, like school recitals, sports, mechanics at work, and manufacturing processes in factories.

The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The majority of films represented in the collection are silent, black and white, and were filmed in North Carolina. The collection includes a small number of color films and one film with sound. Reels containing mixed black and white and color footage were separated into two reels based on picture characteristic during the preservation process.

The collection also contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters, including: photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; VHS copies of a news report and a film on Waters; a copy of the master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Martin Johnson in 2005; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters. In addition, the collection contains a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters between the years of 1936 and 1942 to document his earnings from the Movies of Local People films. The logs provide information about film screenings in the towns that he visited, including the dates of the screenings, the theaters where the films played, admission prices, the number of tickets sold, and advertising revenues. See the digital collection to view the logbooks.

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James H. Karales photographs, 1953-2006 and undated 18 Linear Feet — Approximately 15,000 items

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Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to most but not
other subjects. Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to
://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/research/citations-and-permissions
Noted American photojournalist who worked for LOOK magazine; resident of New York, N.Y. The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly-complete photographic archive of photojournalist James Karales, active from the 1950s to the 1980s. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. His major projects include images from Rendville, Ohio, a coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam during the war; New York's Lower East Side; Oregon logging; and individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups - the Martin Luther King, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and Civil Rights Series. Other smaller projects include images of California, New Mexico, and other subjects. Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to almost all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and over 1100 color slides. There are also many print materials and some correspondence and audiovisual materials. Acquired by the Center of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly complete photographic archive of well-known 20th century American photojournalist James Karales. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. The collection is organized around the following project series: Rendville, Ohio, a declining coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam, where Karales documented many scenes from the Vietnam War - the largest series in the collection; the Lower East Side, featuring street scenes and portraits from that New York City neighborhood; and Logging, where Karales documented the Pacific Northwest logging industry's practices and culture. Finally, Karales also shot many images of individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups: the Martin Luther King Series; Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Series; and the Civil Rights Series.

There is also a small group of supporting materials in the Manuscript and Printed Materials Series and the Audiovisual Materials Series that includes biographical documents such as Karales' curriculum vitae; Karales' essays on photography and teaching; publicity for exhibits and other events; correspondence with publishers; digitized images of Vietnam photos on a CD; and clippings, magazine layouts, and other materials related to Karales' published work. One recently dated item is an audiocassette of remarks on Karales' life and works made by Sam Stephenson at the opening of an exhibit of Karales' work at the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.

Publications where Karales' works appeared include Look, Life, Saturday Review, Pageant, Coronet, Popular Photography, Time-Life books, and several encyclopedias. Karales also produced commercial work for corporate annual reports. The collection does not include Karales' photojournalistic work from East Germany (1970), or Gheel, Belgium (1961). A number of Karales' images from the U.S. civil rights movement achieved iconographic status, and were - and still are - widely reproduced. His work is represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to most but not all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and several hundred color slides. Unless otherwise noted, the photographic items are arranged in the following sequence in each series: contact sheets, prints (from smallest to largest), slides, negatives, and finally, duplicates. There are also digital jpeg files for selected images in certain series (Vietnam, Rendville). One print in the Civil Rights series was created by documentary photographer Alex Harris for an exhibit at Duke University and is noted in the collection guide's entry for this print.

Beginning with the contact sheets, researchers using the collection can note any identifying codes for the image, which may include Karales' job number (Karales assigned most of his jobs or photographic projects alpha-numeric codes), roll number, and frame (image) number, in that order. Whenever possible, Rubenstein staff have included these numbers with individual prints and negatives and within the collection's inventory to aid in matching nd discovery. In addition, staff have noted where film rolls are located within folders. For finished prints (typically 11x14 inches and larger), individual descriptions and unique Rubenstein library identifiers (beginning with "RL") have been assigned. There are a few images that have no identifying numbers and could not otherwise be identified from contact sheets or negatives. Such captions appear in brackets.

In order to facilitate the use of the materials, please consult with a Research Services archivist before coming to use this collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Industry Citation for Distinguished Public Service (1984) and the North Carolina Distinguished Service
guide for details before coming to use these materials.
Collection consists of correspondence, financial papers, legal papers, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, films, audio tapes, and other materials reflecting the philanthropic, financial, cultural and social activities of the Semans family and other wealthy families in North Carolina and New York. A major focus is the interrelationship of the Semans family with the Biddle, Duke, and Trent families. Additionally, the papers document the roles of Mary Duke Biddle, James H. Semans and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans have taken in the development and support of arts and educational programs throughout North Carolina. To a lesser degree, the papers reflect women in politics and childcare issues during the early 20th century.

The papers of the Semans family span the years 1878 to 2008. The collection consists of four large sub-collections: the Mary Duke Biddle Family Papers, the James H. Semans Family Papers, the James H. and Mary D.B.T. Semans Family Papers, and the Elizabeth Lucina Gotham Family Papers. There are also series for films, oversize materials, and later additions.

Through files of correspondence, financial papers, legal papers, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, films, audio tapes, and other materialsThe collection reflects the philanthropic, financial, cultural, and social activities of the Semans family. Major areas of focus are the personal and social relationships of the Semans family with the Biddle, Duke, and Trent, and other wealthy families from North Carolina, New York, and elsewhere. Additionally, the papers document the roles Mary Duke Biddle, James H. Semans, and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans have taken in the development and support of arts and educational programs throughout North Carolina. To a lesser degree, the papers reflect on women in politics and childcare during the early twentieth century.

Individuals represented include Mary Duke Biddle (daughter of Benjamin Duke), Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, Nicholas Benjamin Duke Biddle, Angier Biddle Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Benjamin Newton Duke, Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, Elizabeth Lucina Gotham, and Josiah Charles Trent as well as other members of the Duke, Biddle, Trent, and Semans families. Political, arts, and educational leaders are also represented.

Subject areas represented include: families in the late 19th and 20th centuries; the arts in North Carolina and other cities; charities, particularly in North Carolina; childcare and women in nursing; The Duke Endowment; Duke University and other universities and colleges; the North Carolina School of the Arts; education; genealogy of the four families; personal finances; philanthropy; the history of Durham, NC, and its politics and social life; vocational rehabilitation; and the Methodist church, particularly in NC.

The 25 16mm film reels in the collection are chiefly children's cartoons from the 1930s-1940s, but there are also wartime newsreels and a few films for adults, some as early as 1916-1917, and some travel film. Audio tapes consist chiefly of personal family recordings, a set of memoirs dictated onto cassettes in 1977 by Mary D.B.T. Semans, and music performances.

Some portions of the collection are restricted or closed to use; please consult this collection guide for details before coming to use these materials.

For additional collections of Duke family papers, see the Washington Duke Papers, the Benjamin Newton Duke Papers, and the James B. Duke Papers. For further information on the contributions of the Duke family to Duke University, contact the Duke University Archives.

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J. B. Matthews papers, 1862-1986 and undated 479 Linear Feet — 307,000 items

of data on the cards include citations to information on persons in periodicals or other sources
File gives citations in this publication for information on persons. Perkins Library stacks does not
citations for information on persons in various periodicals such as Daily Worker. Titles are given as
J. B. Matthews (1894-1966) was a Methodist missionary, college professor, author, lecturer, and prominent conservative spokesman. Collection consists of correspondence, memoranda, statements, speeches, reprints, clippings, broadsides, newsletters, press releases, petitions, and other printed material, chiefly 1930-1969. The principal focus of the collection relates to the work and research of Matthews and his associates in the area of anti-communism, particularly in connection with Matthews' role as Director of Research for the Special Committee on Un-American Activities of the U.S. House of Representatives (1938-1945), Executive Director of the Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations of the U.S. Senate (1953), and a consultant for John A. Clements Associates. Many of the organizations, newspapers, periodicals, and persons represented in the collection have various leftist, socialist, communist, radical, or pacifist (especially anti-Vietnam War) connections. Individuals represented in the files include Ralph Abernathy, Bella Abzug, Roy Cohn, John Foster Dulles, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Michael Harrington, Alger Hiss, J. Edgar Hoover, Jesse Jackson, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Coretta Scott King, Joseph Lash, Joseph McCarthy, Carl McIntire, Benjamin Mandel, Richard Nixon, Aristotle Onassis, Lee Harvey Oswald, Linus Pauling, Drew Pearson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Louis Untermeyer.

The papers of J.B. (Joseph Brown) Matthews span the years 1862 to 1986, although the bulk of the collection falls during the 1930s to the 1960s. Included are correspondence, memoranda, statements, speeches, reprints, clippings, broadsides, newsletters, press releases, petitions, and other printed material. there is virtually no material relating to Matthews' early work as a Methodist missionary and college professor or to his involvement with various leftist and radical groups during the 1930s. The principal focus of the collection relates to the work and research of Matthews and his associates in the area of anticommunism. This focus is especially reflected in the Vertical Files, Persons, and Card File Series in the collection with many of the organizations, newspapers, periodicals, and persons represented therein having various leftist, socialist, communist, pacifist, or radical connections. The Vertical Files Series, primarily covering the period of the 1940s through the 1960s, constitutes over three-fourths of the bulk of the total collection, with printed matter comprising a large portion of the individual files. Originally the Vertical Files Series was a set of duplicate files that J.B. Matthews kept while working as a consultant for John A. Clements Associates. He later acquired other material and integrated it into the original files. During processing, many loose papers, unlabelled folders, and unorganized files were integrated into this Series when appropriate. There is, however, some overlap among the materials in the Vertical Files Series, the Research Correspondence Series, and the Persons Files Series.

Organizations represented in the Vertical Files Series include many peace and anti-Vietnam war groups, such as America First Committee, American League Against War and Fascism, American League for Peace and Democracy, American Peace Crusade, American Peace Mobilization, Church Peace Union, Committee for Non-Violent Action, National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Promoting Enduring Peace, Vietnam Day Committee, War Resisters League, World Council of Peace, and Youth Against War and Fascism. Also included are other organizations, such as the Women's International Democratic Federation, Women Strike for Peace, Black Panther Party, National Negro Labor Council, and Revolutionary Action Movement. Other representative categories in this Series include the American Civil Liberties Union, American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, American Friends Service Committee, American Legion, Americans for Democratic Action, Communism and the Communist Party, Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, The Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, Fellowship of Reconciliation, Foreign Policy Association, Institute of Pacific Relations, Ku Klux Klan, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, World Federation of Trade Unions, Young Socialist Alliance, United Nations; and the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America. At the end of this series are folders for various miscellaneous organizations and miscellaneous lists of organizations.

The Persons Files Series consists of files of information about persons who were investigated because of suspected communist or communist-front connections and volumes of indexes and selected documents. m e individual persons files, which are generally quite slim, usually include written statements about people and their activities, accusations against them, and other Items such as speeches, memoranda, and clippings, often including the source of the information. This series also includes files gathered by associates of Matthews. Included in the volumes in this series is the "Index to Organizations and their Members," ca. 1930s-1950s. Names of organizations, institutes, conferences, periodicals, committees, councils, appeals, funds, etc., are organized alphabetically. Below the name is the dated source of the information, such as a leaflet or letterhead, followed by the names of members of that organization, often including a brief biographical phrase identifying each person.

Also in the volumes are an "Index to Individuals," and an "Index to Organizations and Publications." These indexes refer to page numbers in the volumes of selected documents where one can locate references to the names of the person, publication, or organization. Examples of the types of documents to be found are letters; portions of newsletters and journals; newspaper clippings; programs; petitions; press releases; articles; announcements of meetings; partial directories; and lists of staff, sponsors, or officers of organizations. Each volume of selected documents is indexed separately. In addition, each volume of selected documents also has its own index at the front. Some volumes are incomplete and/or unbound.

Benjamin Mandel was an important associate of J.B. Matthews and the series within the collection bearing his name forms an important component of the papers. Like Matthews, Mandel also was involved with various communist organizations only to change his views in later life. Mandel was a leading member of the Communist Party in the 1920s and later joined the research staff of the House Un-American Activities Committee and from 1950 to 1967 served as the research director of the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee. Included in this series is a file of correspondence, 1939-1969, between Matthews and Mandel and subject files relating to the F.B.I. and J. Edgar Hoover.

Matthews's personal and private life is reflected in the Personal Series. Included are family papers, private correspondence, material he collected, columns and editorials in which he is mentioned, and Items about his death. Telephone messages, 1949-1955, are mostly typed carbons that were created while he worked for John A. Clements Associates. This series reveals information about family relationships, including his children Joseph, Jr. (married to Helen; children were Susan, and twins Sharon and Steve); Roy (married to Genevieve; children are Brian and JoAnne); Martin S.; Margaret (married to John Burd; children are Larry and Marilyn, who married Thomas Quinn); and Grace (married to Wayne Cressman). In the Joseph Matthews file is information pertaining to the tragic suicide/murder incident involving J.B. Matthews' son, Joseph, Jr. Other family members represented in this series are Matthews' sister, Jesse Matthews Sikes, and his second wife, Ruth E. Shallcross Matthews, who was an economist at the Institute of Paper Chemistry; she later married George Erskine Maynard on July 14, 1951.

In the Ruth I. Matthews series are the papers of the third wife of J.B. Matthews, who also had been a consultant to the Hearst Corporation, but, contrary to her husband, has always held conservative political views. She has had an important career in her own right, most recently as treasurer, assistant publisher, and trustee of Consumer's Research Magazine and as a free lance writer. She has been a professor of sociology at the University of Washington and research editor of Combat, a subsidiary of National Review; helped launch Deadline Data on World Affairs; and was a staff member of the House Committee on Internal Security.

Highlights of the titles in the Volumes Series are "Subversive Activities Investigation" (Investigatory Hearings of the New York Department of Labor's Industrial Commission), 1941; "Master Reference on Communism;" "Communist Perspective: A Handbook of Communist Doctrinal Statements in the Original Russian and English;" "Communism in the Motion Picture Industry;" Joint Statement of Five Employees of Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Company Before the House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, 1947; and works of J.B. Matthews: Odyssey of a Fellow Traveler and Guinea Pigs No More. In this series are two reports published by John A. Clements Associates: "Report on Venezuela" (1958) and "Report on Guatemala" (1952). A mimeographed report, "Vanguard in Guatemala - The Myth Comes to America," used by J.B. and Ruth I. Matthews for "Report on Guatemala" is in the Addresses and Writings Series.

In the picture cabinet are oversize items, such as an invitation to a dinner and awards presentation sponsored by the American-Russian Institute, including the names of the Board of Directors of the Institute and the sponsors. Also included, from the American League Against War and Fascism folder, is a 1936 calendar with appropriate artwork. A large poster advertises the book Partners in Plunder by J.B. and Ruth Shallcross Matthews.

The collection includes extensive card files, which are principally comprised of files of names. The two major files in the Card Files Series are the J.B. Matthews File and the Donald I. Sweany File. In general, there is more factual information, as opposed to referrals to others sources, in Sweany's File, Although both files contain both types of information. Donald I. Sweany, who compiled the Sweany File, was a friend of the Matthewses' and a member of the American Legion. The card file was originally prepared for the Legion; the Rubenstein Library has the carbon copies he prepared on paper slips. The types of data on the cards include citations to information on persons in periodicals or other sources, such as the Fish Hearings; and biographical information about persons. Sometimes a source is given.

Another file in the Card Files Series is the Titles of Publications File. These cards have the title of a publication at the top, with one or more of the following pieces of information: a number, name of a person, date, letter/number combination, or abbreviation of an organization. The Tocsin File gives citations in this publication for information on persons. Perkins Library stacks does not have holdings of Tocsin. In the Vertical Files Series of this collection, there are a few folders of Tocsin material, including issues from 1960 plus an index to Tocsin, 1961-1965.

Also included in the Card Files Series is the In Process Files, including a variety of cards that Ruth and J.B. Matthews were working on, such as some cards to be filed in the Matthews name file. Other cards contain a statement from a newspaper or petition which was signed by several people. The Matthewses would then type the name of each person at the top of a card with the statement on it, and then file the cards by name. The Miscellaneous File is a small alphabetical file of miscellaneous information, such as addresses. Included are the names and addresses of publications to which the Matthewses subscribed. The 4 X 6 Cards File is a separate set of files that the Matthewses obtained from an unknown source. It primarily contains brief information about organizations, people, and various subjects.

The final file in the Card Files Series is the large J.B. Matthews File. These cards include information about various persons, such as organization affiliation, relationship to the organization, and source of the information. The name of the organization is usually given as an acronym. Other cards give citations for information on persons in various periodicals such as Daily Worker. Titles are given as acronyms, such as "DW." There is a guide key to these acronyms, called "Key to Organizations." It includes both publications as well as organizations, and is located on top of Cabinet 10. A few cards contain information about a person with the source of the information. Some cards note, "See folder in file cabinet of persons." There are folders for some of these names in the Persons Files Series; for others there are not. Another notation on cards is, "See SB File." The "SB" refers to Stephen Birmingham, an investigator for the House Un-American Activities Committee in the 1930s. When he retired, he gave his file to Matthews. The Manuscript Department does not have his file, but it was too time-consuming to remove all these cards.

Throughout the collection, in general, there tend to be small amounts of information about numerous persons. It is not possible to mention here all the important names that appear in the papers. There are subject cards in the card catalog for the names that follow as well as many others. Included is information on Joseph McCarthy, J. Edgar Hoover, Benjamin Mandel, Ralph Abernathy, Bella Abzug, Roy Cohn, John Foster Dulles, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Michael Harrington, Alger Hiss, Jesse Jackson, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Coretta Scott King, Joseph Lash, Fulton Lewis, Malcolm X, Carl McIntire, Francis McNamara, Richard Nixon, Aristotle Onassis, Lee Harvey Oswald, Linus Pauling, Drew Pearson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Louis Untermeyer. In addition, there is some correspondence in the Research Correspondence Series with John T. Flynn, 1947-1964; Westbrook Pegler, 1936-1969; Norman Vincent Peale, 1955-1962; and Victor Riesel, 1948-1952.

It is important when checking for names of persons in the inventory to consult all the following series: Vertical Files Series; Persons Files Series, including the indexes at the end; Research Correspondence Series; and Card Files Series. There are references in some folders to a card for a person in the Card Files Series.