Locus Science Fiction Foundation archives, 1942-2012 and undated

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Summary

Creator:
Locus Science Fiction Foundation
Abstract:
Locus, the Magazine of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Field, was co-founded by Charles N. Brown (1937-2009), Ed Meskys (1936-), and Dave Vanderwerf (1944-) in New York in 1968. It first began as a science-fiction and fantasy one-sheet news fanzine that was created to help the Boston Science Fiction Group win its 1971 Worldcon bid. Vanderwerf left after issue #4, and Meskys after #11. Charles Brown remained as editor until his death in 2009. The Locus Archives include names files for more than 800 people, many of whom are writers, editors, or publishers. The files contain correspondence, clippings, obituaries, and writings, the bulk of which relate to American writers, though there are several files kept on writers and fans from across the world, including China, Japan, and Russia. Much of the correspondence is about publishing news, corrections, and deaths in the science-fiction, fantasy, and horror community. There are several well-known correspondents including: Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Jim Baen, Ian and Betty Ballantine, Algis Budrys, Octavia E. Butler, Arthur C. Clarke, L. Sprague de Camp, Harlan Ellison, Robert Heinlein, Ursula K. Le Guin, Dean Koontz, Andre Alice Norton, James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice Sheldon), and Gene Wolfe.
Extent:
10 Linear Feet
Language:
Materials in English
Collection ID:
RL.11689

Background

Scope and content:

Collection includes names files for more than 800 people, many of whom are writers, editors, or publishers. The files contain correspondence, clippings, obituaries, and writings, the bulk of which relate to American writers, though there are several files kept on writers and fans from across the world, including China, Japan, and Russia. Much of the correspndence is about publishing news, corrections, and deaths in the science-fiction, fantasy, and horror community. There are several well-known correspondents including: Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Jim Baen, Ian and Betty Ballantine, Algis Budrys, Octavia E. Butler, Arthur C. Clarke, L. Sprague de Camp, Harlan Ellison, Robert Heinlein, Ursula K. Le Guin, Dean Koontz, Andre Alice Norton, James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice Sheldon), and Gene Wolfe.

Biographical / historical:

Locus, the Magazine of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Field, was co-founded by Charles N. Brown (1937-2009), Ed Meskys (1936-), and Dave Vanderwerf (1944-) in New York in 1968. It first began as a science-fiction and fantasy one-sheet news fanzine that was created to help the Boston Science Fiction Group win its 1971 Worldcon bid. Vanderwerf left after issue #4, and Meskys after #11. Charles Brown remained as editor until his death in 2009. His first wife Marsha Elkin Brown (later Marsha Jones) was co-editor from 1968-69, and his second wife Dena Benatan Brown was co-editor from 1970-77. In 1972 Charles Brown and the magazine relocated to the Bay Area in California. After his death, the magazine became owned by The Locus Science Fiction Foundation (LSFF), which is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit dedicated to the promotion and preservation of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Its central activity is the publication of Locus and its website Locus Online. LSFF is also responsible for the annual Locus Awards, first presented in 1971, to recognize excellence in science-fiction and fantasy literature. The magazine has won many Hugo awards.

Charles N. Brown (1937-2009) was a writer, editor, and science-fiction fan and collector. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Brown served in the US Navy from 1956-1959 and worked as an engineer until 1975. In 1968 he co-founded Locus magazine and remained editor until his death in 2009. Brown also edited the fiction anthologies Alien Worlds (1976), Far Travellers (1976), and The Locus Awards (2004).

Acquisition information:
The Locus Science Fiction Foundatoin Archives were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book Manuscript Library as a purchase in 2018.
Processing information:

Processed by Laurin Penland, January, 2018.

Accessions described in this collection guide: 2018-0107.

Arrangement:

Organized alphabetically by name.

Rules or conventions:
Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Contents

Using These Materials

Using These Materials Links:

Using These Materials


Restrictions:

Collection is open for research.

Original audio materials are closed to use. Contact Research Services in advance to request the production of listening copies.

Terms of access:

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

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Preferred citation:

[Identification of item], Locus Science Fiction Foundation Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.