Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: doris duke Remove constraint doris duke

Search Results

online icon

Doris Duke Photograph collection, 1880-2006

56.6 Linear Feet — approximately 12,000 Items
Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder of the American Tobacco Company and Duke Energy Company and a benefactor of Duke University, and Nanaline Holt Duke. Inheriting a bulk of her father's estate in 1925, which included Duke Farms in New Jersey, Rough Point in Newport, R.I., and a mansion in New York City, Doris was soon dubbed by the press as "the richest girl in the world." Although Doris did her best to live a private life, she carried on the Duke family's pattern of philanthropy by contributing to a number of public causes such as the arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In her will she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The Doris Duke Photograph Collection was created by combining color and black and white photographs, slides, negatives, and other photographic formats contained in albums, boxes, picture frames, and envelopes.

The Doris Duke Photograph Collection was created by combining color and black and white photographs, slides, negatives, and other photographic formats contained in albums, boxes, picture frames, and envelopes into groupings closely mirroring the collections that constitute the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives. The collection covers the years 1870 to 2006 and is organized into twelve series: Doris Duke, Duke Endowment, Duke Farms, Duke Gardens, Duke Family, Falcon Lair, General, New York Apartments/New York Mansion, Newport Restoration Foundation, Rough Point, Southeast Asian Art and Culture (SEAAC), and Shangri La.

In cases where the copyright of the image does not belong to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, these are noted in the finding aid and use restrictions/citation information is included when possible.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 750
collection icon

Doris Duke Photograph collection, 1880-2006 56.6 Linear Feet — approximately 12,000 Items

online icon
Doris Duke Papers, 1798-2003 and undated (bulk 1930-1999) David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript
Library Doris Duke Papers on the Duke Farms Residence, 1859-2004 and undated David M. Rubenstein Rare Book
folder icon
online icon
Doris Duke Photograph collection, 1880-2006
This series documents Doris Duke's life from the time she was an infant to a few years before and

This series documents Doris Duke's life from the time she was an infant to a few years before and after her death in 1993. The photographs, slides, and negatives are grouped by topic and therefore do not always share the same creation date nor are they necessarily the same formats. Topics include social events, passport photos, life at her various residences, travel, her time as a war correspondent, her honeymoon, her many animals at the various residences, and her jewelry and dresses. Of particular interest are the color glass mounted slides of Doris Duke's trip to the Middle East in 1938.

Doris Duke Oral History collection, 1998-2009

8.7 Linear Feet — 400 Items
Established in September 2003, the Doris Duke Oral History Collection documents the testimonies of staff at Duke Farms, at Shangri La, and of close, personal friends of Doris Duke. At present, there are 35 interviews available for research. The oral histories covers the period 1998 to 2009, and is divided into 4 series: Duke Farms, Shangri La, Newport Restoration Foundation, and Administrative Records. Digital copies of the interviews and transcripts are available in the Rubenstein Library reading room. This collection is currently restricted and requires prior approval by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to use.

Established in September 2003, the Doris Duke Oral History Collection is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection documents the testimonies of staff at Duke Farms, at Shangri La, and of close, personal friends of Doris Duke. At present, there are 35 interviews available for research.

The oral histories covers the period 1998 to 2009, and is divided into 4 series: Duke Farms, Shangri La, Newport Restoration Foundation, and Administrative Records. In most cases each interview has several components including the original recording of the interview on cassette tape, transcripts (which includes release form, correspondence, and verbatim, edited and final transcripts), and an access copy of both the transcript and interview. For a majority of the interviews, digital copies of the interviews and transcripts are available in the Rubenstein Library reading room.

This collection is currently restricted and requires prior approval by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to use.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 130
collection icon

Doris Duke Oral History collection, 1998-2009 8.7 Linear Feet — 400 Items

Doris Duke Papers on the Duke Farms Residence, 1859-2004 and undated David M. Rubenstein Rare Book
& Manuscript Library Doris Duke Papers on the Shangri La Residence, 1932-2003 David M. Rubenstein Rare Book

Doris Duke Memorabilia collection, 1898-2011 and undated

28 Linear Feet — 2,400 Items
Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder of the American Tobacco Company and Duke Energy Company and a benefactor of Duke University, and Nanaline Holt Duke. Inheriting a bulk of her father's estate in 1925, which included Duke Farms in New Jersey, Rough Point in Newport, R.I., and a mansion in New York City, Doris was soon dubbed by the press as "the richest girl in the world." Although Doris did her best to live a private life, she carried on the Duke family's pattern of philanthropy by contributing to a number of public causes such as the arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In her will she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The Doris Duke Memorabilia Collection contains personal artifacts belonging to Doris Duke. The artifacts widely vary, yet tend to reflect what was important to Miss Duke including travel, philanthropy, growing orchids, and music. Of particular interest are those items from Doris Duke's childhood including scrapbooks, yearbooks, and homework assignments.

The Doris Duke Memorabilia Collection is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is artificial in nature, created by combining personal artifacts belonging to Doris Duke. The artifacts widely vary, yet tend to reflect what was important to Miss Duke including travel, philanthropy, growing orchids, and music. Of particular interest are those items from Doris Duke's childhood including scrapbooks, yearbooks, and homework assignments.

The Doris Duke Memorabilia Collection covers the period 1898 to 2011 and is divided into 5 series: Awards and Tributes, Indentification and Membership Cards, Invitations, Miscellaneous, and Postcards. The materials are loosely arranged in chronological order.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 252
collection icon
Born on November 22, 1912, Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder
arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In

Doris Duke audiovisual collection, 1899-2012 and undated

51 Linear Feet
Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder of the American Tobacco Company and Duke Energy Company and a benefactor of Duke University, and Nanaline Holt Duke. Although Doris did her best to live a private life, she carried on the Duke family's pattern of philanthropy by contributing to a number of public causes such as the arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In her will she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The Doris Duke Audio Visual Collection was created by combining 8mm, 16mm, and 35mm film reels, vinyl recordings, audiocassettes, and associated manuscript materials relating to Doris Duke's travels, her various estates, and her interests in jazz and gospel music, dance, history, and culture. The collection covers the years 1899 to 2012 and is organized into three series: Moving Images, Audio, and Sheet Music and Index Cards.

The Doris Duke Audiovisual Collection was created by combining 8mm, 16mm, and 35mm film reels, vinyl recordings, audiocassettes, and associated manuscript materials relating to Doris Duke's travels, her various estates, and her interests in jazz and gospel music, dance, history, and culture. The collection covers the years 1899 to 2012 and is organized into three series: Moving Images, Audio, and Sheet Music and Index Cards.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 922
collection icon
Born on November 22, 1912, Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder
arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In

Doris Duke Foundation records, 1934-2009 (bulk 1948-1982)

45 Linear Feet — 30,755 Items
The Doris Duke Foundation, Inc., formerly known as Independent Aid, Inc., was incorporated in 1934 as a philanthropic organization to operate for charitable, educational, and scientific purposes. In October 1951, the officers of Independent Aid, Inc. voted to change its name to the Doris Duke Foundation. At the time of this change, the foundation's interests were primarily in the fields of education and welfare. The materials in this collection illustrate Doris Duke’s devotion to philanthropy as well as her many varied interests. Some of the major topics represented in the Donation Files are poverty, the disabled, education, health care, animal welfare, underprivileged children, and the performing arts. The Doris Duke Foundation continues to exist as a private grant-making entity.

The Doris Duke Foundation records (formerly DDF.9) is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into three series: Administrative Records, Financial Records, and Subject Files. It primarily spans the years 1934–2009, although the bulk of the collection is concentrated from the late 1940s–1982. The records illustrate Doris Duke’s devotion to philanthropy as well as her many varied interests. Some of the major topics represented in the Donation Files are poverty, the disabled, education, health care, animal welfare, underprivileged children, the performing arts (including musical prodigies Lorin Maazel and Dike Newlin), refugees, and various community services. Two topics of great interest to Miss Duke were spirituality and American Indians. This is illustrated by the extensive files on the Self-Realization Fellowship Church and the American Indian Oral History Project. Doris Duke’s own notations are sometimes found in the Subject Files series, demonstrating her very close involvement with the foundation. Geographically there is a focus on “local” organizations based in areas connected with the Duke Family. These include New York City, New Jersey, North Carolina, Rhode Island, and Hawaii. Several international organizations are also represented.

From the 1930s until the mid-seventies the records were maintained at the Doris Duke Foundation’s (also Independent Aid, Inc.’s) office in New York City (New York Business Office was located at 30 Rockefeller Plaza until 1971 when it was relocated to 505 Park Avenue). In March 1975 the Duke Business Office moved to the New Jersey estate, and records from that point on were maintained at Duke Farms.

The records appeared to have been maintained by the Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Foundation. These include Marion Paschal beginning in the 1930s/early 1940s until her death in 1946 (although according to the records Clarence E. Pickett served as Executive Secretary during this time period, M. Paschal might have been Treasurer or had a different administrative title); Georgea T. Furst from 1946–1953 (from 1943–1946 she served as Assistant to the Executive Secretary and Board Member Clarence E. Pickett); Sophia van Theis from 1953–1957; and May E. McFarland from 1957 until 1975. After the move to New Jersey the records were maintained by Elisabeth McConville (although she appears to have had a purely secretarial, not executive, position, that role seems to have been taken on by A.E. Searles).

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 954
collection icon
The Doris Duke Foundation, Inc., formerly known as Independent Aid, Inc., was incorporated in 1934
. Doris Duke decided when she reached her majority to organize a foundation in order to deal with the many

Doris Duke papers on the Falcon Lair residence, 1937-1999

4.6 Linear Feet — 3,285 Items
The Falcon Lair residence was purchased by Doris Duke in April, 1953 primarily for use on her occasional visits to California and for use while she was in transit to or from her residence in Honolulu. Compared to her other estates, the residence was not large, however, being located in the hills above Benedict Canyon overlooking Beverly Hills, it served as a retreat from public life. Soon after the home was purchased, Doris Duke hired Tony Duquette to supervise the entire redecoration and remodeling of Falcon Lair. The home was renovated again in the mid-1970s. Miss Duke lived at Falcon Lair until her death in 1993, and in 1998 the property was sold by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1937 to 1999, beginning with the purchase and interior renovation of the home and ending with maintenance and general upkeep of the home after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of renovating, running, and maintaining the Falcon Lair residence, and includes invoices and receipts for services and repairs, correspondence, memoranda, and telegrams relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, and photo inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Falcon Lair residence.

The Doris Duke papers on the Falcon Lair residence (formerly FL.5) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1937 to 1999, beginning with the purchase and interior renovation of the home and ending with maintenance and general upkeep of the home after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of renovating, running, and maintaining the Falcon Lair residence, and includes invoices and receipts for services and repairs, correspondence, memoranda, and telegrams relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, and photo inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Falcon Lair residence. The materials in this collection are arranged in chronological order and alphabetically there under.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 169
collection icon
The Falcon Lair residence was purchased by Doris Duke in April, 1953 primarily for use on her
purchased, Doris Duke hired Tony Duquette to supervise the entire redecoration and remodeling of Falcon Lair

Doris Duke papers on the Shangri La residence, 1932-2003

16.8 Linear Feet — approx. 10,680 Items
Traveling through many Muslim countries and parts of India during her honeymoon, Doris Duke was fascinated by Islamic cultural traditions, art and architecture. A visit to the Taj Mahal inspired Duke to eventually commission plans for the house she built in Hawaii. Duke engaged the architectural firm of Wyeth and King to design her Hawaiian home, and architects Marion Sims Wyeth and H. Drewry Baker worked closely with Duke to design the home, with Duke providing sketches and photographs of buildings and architectural details she had seen during her travels. Throughout her life, Doris Duke enthusiastically designed and redesigned her home and gardens, and in 1965 made a codicil in her will directing her executors to organize a foundation to manage and maintain Shangri La for the study and understanding of Middle Eastern art and culture. The collection tells the story of Shangri La, the most intimate of Doris Duke's residences. While the collection spans the years 1932 to 2003, the materials primarily begin in 1936, with correspondence relating to early discussions of architects to design Shangri La in what was then the U.S. Territory of Hawaii, and end in the mid to late 1990s with materials related to the handling of the Estate of Doris Duke after her death in 1993. The materials primarily detail the design, construction, decoration, and furnishing of Shangri La and the routine business matters of its daily operation.

The Doris Duke papers on the Shangri La residence (formerly SL.2 and SL.2.8) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection tells the story of Shangri La, the most intimate of Doris Duke's residences. While the collection spans the years 1932 to 2003, the materials primarily begin in 1936, with correspondence relating to early discussions of architects to design Shangri La in what was then the U.S. Territory of Hawaii, and end in the mid to late 1990s with materials related to the handling of the Estate of Doris Duke after her death in 1993. The collection is arranged into three series: Correspondence, Administrative Records, and Architectural Records. Nearly half of the correspondence specifically pertains to the design, construction, decoration, and furnishing of Shangri La. The remaining materials in the series detail the activities of Shangri La and include correspondence and memoranda documenting the routine business matters of its daily operation. The materials included in the Administrative Records series primarily document the expenses and daily operations of running and maintaining the Hawaiian residence. Included in this series are invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residence, expenses and expenditures, and inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items. Also included in this series are weekly security reports, location diaries of Doris Duke's whereabouts, and recipes for a variety of meals that were presumably prepared at Shangri La. A majority of the architectural records in this collection are related to the design and construction of Shangri La. The materials in this collection are arranged loosely in chronological order.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 438
collection icon

Doris Duke papers on the Shangri La residence, 1932-2003 16.8 Linear Feet — approx. 10,680 Items

In 1935, when Doris Duke and her husband James Cromwell embarked on a honeymoon tour of the world
. Furnishing the home was another major undertaking. Doris Duke and her husband traveled to Europe and the

Doris Duke papers on the Rough Point residence, 1922-1997

7.8 Linear Feet — approximately 2,400 Items
Rough Point was purchased by James B. Duke in 1922. When Duke passed away in 1925, he left the home to his 12-year-old daughter Doris, subject to Mrs. (Nanaline) Duke's life interest. Although Nanaline Duke continued to spend her summers at Rough Point, in the early 1950s she took up permanent residence in New York City and emptied Rough Point of all its furnishings. It was around this time that Doris Duke once again became a frequent visitor to Newport and turned her attention to renovating and refurnishing the family estate. Upon her death in 1993, Miss Duke bequeathed the estate to the Newport Restoration Foundation with the directive that it be opened to the public as a museum. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of running, renovating, and maintaining the Rough Point estate, and includes invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residence, correspondence and memoranda relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items, and several appraisals of the residence and its household effects. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Rough Point residence as designed by the Horace Trumbauer firm.

The Doris Duke Papers on the Rough Point Residence (formerly RP.4) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records and Architectural Records. It spans the years 1922 to 1997, beginning with invoices and vouchers of furnishings, paintings, and rugs purchased for Rough Point by James Buchanan (J.B.) and Nanaline Duke, and ending with maintenance and general upkeep of the estate after Doris Duke's death in 1993. The collection primarily documents the expenses and daily operations of running, renovating, and maintaining the Rough Point estate, and includes invoices and receipts for repairs and renovations to the residence, correspondence and memoranda relating to routine matters of the residence, expenses, inventories of furniture, fixtures, and other household items, and several appraisals of the residence and its household effects. A majority of the architectural records detail alterations and additions to the Rough Point residence as designed by the Horace Trumbauer firm. The materials in this collection are arranged loosely in chronological order.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 254
collection icon

Doris Duke papers on the Rough Point residence, 1922-1997 7.8 Linear Feet — approximately 2,400 Items

completed in 1924. When Duke passed away a year later, he left the home to his 12-year-old daughter Doris
that Doris Duke once again became a frequent visitor to Newport and turned her attention to renovating

Doris Duke Papers, 1798-2003 and undated (bulk 1930-1999)

245 Linear Feet — 81,656 Items
Born on November 22, 1912, Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder of the American Tobacco Company and Duke Energy Company and a benefactor of Duke University, and Nanaline Holt Duke. Inheriting a bulk of her father's estate in 1925, which included Duke Farms in New Jersey, Rough Point in Newport, R.I., and a mansion in New York City, Doris was soon dubbed by the press as "the richest girl in the world." Although Doris did her best to live a private life, she contributed to a number of public causes and was an active supporter of the arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In her will she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The Doris Duke Papers were created by combining materials maintained by staff at the Duke Business Office and/or household staff of the Main Residence, on Doris Duke's behalf. It mostly contains the personal papers generated by or about Doris Duke throughout her lifetime. The collection covers the period 1798 to 2003, although the majority of the collection is concentrated in the 1930s to 1993. The collection is organized into 9 series limited to Doris Duke's personal relationships, dealings, and interests: Administrative Records, Personal Correspondence, Financial Records, Legal Records, Reports and Summaries, Subject Files, and Duke Business Office Safe.

The Doris Duke papers (formerly MSS.001) is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection is artificial in nature, created by combining materials maintained by staff at the Duke Business Office and/or household staff of the Main Residence, on Doris Duke's behalf. It mostly contains the personal papers generated by or about Doris Duke throughout her lifetime. Since Doris Duke's staff maintained her professional and personal records, often in the same filing structures, materials regarding her personal life were intermingled throughtout the larger collection. In order to improve access to important documents, all materials of a personal nature were selected out and incorporated into this collection. The only major exception is Series VII: Duke Business Office Safe, where the personal and professional contents of the office are maintained together to preserve the integrity of the materials and serve as a testament to business operations.

The Doris Duke Papers covers the period 1798 to 2003, although the majority of the collection is concentrated in the 1930s to 1993. The collection is divided into 7 series limited to Doris Duke's personal relationships, dealings, and interests: Administrative Records, Personal Correspondence (RESTRICTED), Financial Records, Legal Records, Reports and Summaries, Subject Files, and Duke Business Office Safe.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 2960
collection icon
Born on November 22, 1912, Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder
foundation which would later became the Doris Duke Foundation. Adventurous, intelligent and independent

Doris Duke papers on the Duke Endowment, 1925-2001, bulk 1956-1993

3.2 Linear Feet — 2,400 Items
Doris Duke's father, James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, established the Duke Endowment as a perpetual charitable trust in 1924. Mr. Duke designed the fund to be both flexible and enduring, but limited its efforts to the Carolinas and to four program areas: child care, health care, higher education, and rural churches. Miss Duke became a trustee of the Endowment in 1933. The collection spans the years 1925 to 2001, with the bulk dating from 1956 through 1993. Collection materials primarily document the administrative business of the Endowment and include correspondence, news stories, meeting materials, financial statements, legal records, reports, and proposals. Many of the materials relate specifically to the Endowment's interests in private university education and health care.

The Doris Duke papers on The Duke Endowment (formerly DE.10) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection spans the years 1925 to 2001, although the bulk of materials date from 1956 through 1993. Doris Duke served as a trustee of the Endowment from 1933 until her death in 1993. Collection materials primarily document the administrative business of the Endowment and include correspondence, invitations and solicitations, news stories, meeting materials, financial statements, legal records, reports, and proposals. Many of the materials relate specifically to the Endowment's interests in private university education and health care. Of particular interest are 21 published annual reports for years between 1939 and 2001, which detail efforts and expenditures in the four program areas J.B. Duke prescribed. The reports include personal stories, examinations of pressing issues, and photos of beneficiaries in later years, and the 1973 issue contains a 50th anniversary tribute to J.B. Duke and the Endowment.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 94
collection icon
Doris Duke's father, James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, established the Duke Endowment as a perpetual
The Doris Duke papers on The Duke Endowment (formerly DE.10) are part of the Doris Duke Charitable