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12th Connecticut Infantry Regiment, Company D record books, 1861-1864 1 Linear Foot — 1 box with 2 volumes inside.

The 12th Connecticut Infantry Regiment was a Union Army regiment active between 1861 and 1865 in the American Civil War. This collection consists of two ledgers, a Clothing Book and a volume titled Morning Reports, which record daily activities, particularly attendance and absense for members of the 12th Connecticut Infantry, Company D, as well as their annual allotments of clothing and equipment.

Collection consists of two records books - a Clothing Book and a Morning Reports book - which were created and kept by Company D officers between 1861 and 1864.

The Clothing Book contains a registry of members of the company and their allocations for the year 1862 of items of clothing, like shirts, shoes, and hats, along with other notes for equipment like their mess kits. It has a record of the estimated value of each item, its date of issue, and any subsequent replacements recorded later on.

The Morning Reports ledger was kept from November 1861 through December 1864 by Captains Nathan Frankan and H. F. Chappell, and record the numbers present and absent for soldiers and officers, as well as any accompanying remarks explaining deviations from the tally sheet.

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1964 Mississippi Summer Project Oral Histories, 1994 34 items — WAV audio files

Thirty-four audio WAV files made from source digital audio tapes of interviews, primarily with participants in the Mississippi Freedom Project, from volunteers to organization leaders.

Thirty-four audio WAV files made from source digital audio tapes of interviews, primarily with participants in the Mississippi Freedom Project, from volunteers to organization leaders. The recordings were used for a Minnesota Public Radio documentary entitled "O Freedom Over Me," produced by John Biewen and Kate Cavett in 1994. In addition to interviews documenting the Project, Biewen and Cavett also talked to community leaders, educators, and activists regarding conditions for African Americans in Mississippi thirty years after Freedom Summer.

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25 Under 25 photographs, 2003 5 Linear Feet — 21 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. The 25 Under 25 project showcases twenty-five of America's most promising photographers, all twenty-five years old or younger. This collection contains 21 prints from an exhibit celebrating the project's initial publication, 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers, a Lyndhurst Book published by powerHouse and the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003.

The 25 Under 25 Photographs collection includes 21 images from an exhibit produced by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003. The images are all taken from volume 1 of 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers, a 2003 Lyndhurst book published by the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books.

The exhibit prints are only a small portion of the photographs published in the book. 21 of the 25 photographers are represented in the collection, most with one print. The photographers and the titles of their projects are listed below in the collection's Description. Dates of photographs are unknown. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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28th Maine Infantry Regiment record books, 1862-1863 2 Linear Feet — 4 volumes

The 28th Maine Infantry Regiment was mustered in October 1862 in Augusta, Maine, and served until August 1863 in the Union Army during the American Civil War. This collection contains four volumes of regimental descriptive and order books documenting the company's activities and enlisted men.

Collection consists of four regimental descriptive and orders books with names and descriptions of the 28th Maine's enlisted men and officers, as well as an order book with copies of orders issued and received by the commanders of the unit from 1862 to 1863. It records the regiment's travels from Maine through New York, Washington, and the Gulf coast region, including New Orleans and Pensacola. Inventory lists notes which soldiers died of disease or were killed in action at Donaldsonville, Louisiana. The orders book includes records of court martials, troop transfers, and rules and regulations.

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Aaron Burr letter, Philadelphia, to Mrs. Burr, 1793, Dec. 24 4 items

Letter (ALS) to Mrs. Burr informing her that Benjamin Rush, uninformed that she is already taking hemlock for her illness, advises the same. Includes transcription.
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Aaron Michael Barker papers, 1905-1979 and undated, bulk 1917-1944 1.4 Linear Feet

This collection includes two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of Jewish, Lithuanian-American merchant A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker’s approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany.

This collection consists of two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Additional items not contained in the scrapbooks include family photographs, a letter, and a ketubah. The scrapbooks were named for World War I and World War II according to the approximate time of the creation of their contents and the subject matter of the newspaper clippings. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker’s approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany. Most of the correspondence is between Michael Barker or Anna Harris Barker and immediate and extended family members.

Barker created the scrapbooks from financial ledgers of his businesses in New Jersey and Wilson, North Carolina, and the financial entries are largely obscured by scrapbook inserts. While he created a majority of the content of the scrapbooks, some items were added after his death, presumably by another family member.

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Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 28 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, titles and dates assigned by former owners, and other notes.

Aaron Siskind (1903-1991) was an American photographer and faculty member of the Chicago Institute of Design and Rhode Island School of Design. Collection consists of 28 black-and-white signed prints by Siskind, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The images form part of two projects, "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world," and feature portraits of African American men, women, and children; street scenes; images from the Apollo and Lafayette theaters, a night club, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches. Some of the images have two copies in the collection, resulting in 23 unique images represented by 28 prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 28 black-and-white photographs taken during the earliest years of Aaron Siskind's career, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The majority of the images feature portraits of African American men, women, and children in various settings: on the street; in the Apollo and Lafayette theaters; in a night club; taking part in a church service; playing around abandoned houses; and posing in bedrooms, kitchens, and other interior rooms of tenement buildings. A few images focus only on buildings or outdoor settings.

Siskind included these and other images in two photo projects in which he played a central role: "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world." "Harlem document" was sponsored by the Photo League of New York. The second project unfolded from about 1939 to 1941 after Siskind left the Photo League; to a large extent, this project carried on his work of documenting street life in Harlem.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They all measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. The year these particular prints were created is unknown. Some of the images have two copies in the collection, resulting in 23 unique images represented by 28 prints. Library staff assigned titles and original negative dates according to original negatives donated by Siskind to the Eastman House; some titles are not known. Titles assigned by a former collector, sometimes present on the back of the prints, are also given in a note field in the entry for each print.

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Abbot Family papers, 1733-1999 and undated, bulk 1860-1910 19 Linear Feet — 10 boxes

The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Abel Beach Nichols papers, 1835-1850 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 Items

Abel Beach Nichols (1796/7-1868) was a merchant, farmer, slave owner and dealer from Bedford County, Virginia. The collection includes a small account book A. B. (Abel Beach) Nichols used to record financial transactions that occurred in Alabama from 1835 to 1836. Nine pages contain handwriting and several pages near the front and back of the book have been removed. Of particular interest are two pages with the heading, A list of the sales of negroes in the State of Alabama in 1835 & 1836, followed by a tabular listing of the number of slaves, their names, from whom purchased, cost, date, to whom sold, time, and amount. In all, Nichols bought and sold 42 slaves for a profit of $21,430.58. Headings such as A list of bonds bought in Alabama ... and Bond on ... in Alabama for articles sold are found on subsequent pages. Also included in the collection are two letters addressed to A. B. Nichols. The 1846 letter, from Pollard Hopkins & Co., describes efforts regarding the sell or hire of Nichols' slave, Henry, and the writer's intention to buy Henry a horse and dray, thereby giving him the means to eventually buy his freedom. The 1850 letter, from Henry, respectfully explains arrangements for acquiring the title to himself.

The collection includes a small account book that A. B. (Abel Beach) Nichols used to record financial transactions that occurred in Alabama from 1835 to 1836. Nine pages contain handwriting and several pages near the front and back of the book have been removed. Of particular interest are two pages with the heading, "A list of the sales of negroes in the State of Alabama in 1835 & 1836," followed by a tabular listing of the number of slaves, their names, from whom purchased, cost, date, to whom sold, time, and amount. In all, Nichols bought and sold 42 slaves for a profit of $21,430.58. Headings such as "A list of bonds bought in Alabama ..." and "Bond on ... in Alabama for articles sold" are found on subsequent pages. Also included in the collection are two letters addressed to A. B. Nichols. The 1846 letter, from Pollard Hopkins & Co., describes efforts regarding the sell or hire of Nichols' slave, Henry, and the "writer's" intention to buy Henry a horse and dray, thereby giving him the means to eventually buy his freedom. The 1850 letter, from Henry, respectfully explains arrangements for acquiring the title to himself.

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Abercrombie & Fitch Quarterly Catalog collection, 1997-2007 3 Linear Feet — 34 Items

Abercrombie and Fitch was founded in 1892 as a sporting goods supplier and expedition outfitter. It currently specializes in upscale sportswear aimed at children and young adults. The Abercrombie & Fitch Quarterly Catalog Collection consists of a run of lifestyle-oriented clothing catalogs issued between 1997 and 2007. The catalog featured articles on a wide range of youth popular culture and lifestyle topics, along with numerous photographs by Bruce Weber. Articles included advice, music and movie reviews, and profiles and interviews with celebrities and cultural critics such as philosopher Slavoj Žižek. The Creative Director for the catalog series was Sam Shahid, who had previously worked in the in-house advertising agencies for Calvin Klein and Banana Republic. After 2003, the lifestyle content and controversial photography was scaled back to focus more narrowly on seasonal fashion.

The Abercrombie & Fitch Quarterly Catalog Collection consists of a run of lifestyle-oriented clothing catalogs issued between 1997 and 2007. The catalog featured articles on a wide range of youth popular culture and lifestyle topics, along with numerous photographs by Bruce Weber. Articles included advice, music and movie reviews, and profiles and interviews with celebrities and cultural critics such as philosopher Slavoj Žižek. The Creative Director for the catalog series was Sam Shahid, who had previously worked in the in-house advertising agencies for Calvin Klein and Banana Republic. After 2003, the lifestyle content and controversial photography was scaled back to focus more narrowly on seasonal fashion.

The collection is arranged chronologically by issue